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Missile Defense

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NEWS
January 12, 2001 | By Jonathan S. Landay, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The United States needs a national missile defense and could deploy the system even before all the technical bugs are worked out, Defense Secretary-designate Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday. "Effective missile defense - not only homeland defense but also the ability to defend U.S. allies abroad and our friends - must be achieved in the most cost-effective manner that technology offers," Rumsfeld testified during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
June 15, 2001
The European allies remain skeptica about . . . missile defense, although they are more prepared than they were to keep an open mind. . . . Their greatest concern is that any missile defense system might in fact encourage rather than discourage proliferation. But a system that might provide greater international security should not be flatly dismissed. [President] Bush still has a considerable job of persuasion to do. But he is setting about it in the right way. He is beginning a debate on an entirely new post-Cold-War security system.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | By Daniel Rubin and Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In a closed-door meeting with his 18 fellow NATO leaders, President Bush picked up some allies yesterday in his effort to rally Europe behind a missile-defense plan. Italy, Spain, Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, Turkey and Britain all spoke warmly of Bush's plan, at least in concept, and in varying degrees, according to officials present. After months of skepticism and outright opposition from friend and foe alike, Bush took pleasure from the relatively warm reception.
NEWS
June 19, 1999 | By Joseph Cirincione
You have to hand it to the proponents of a national missile-defense system. Nothing stops these guys. We have spent more than $120 billion since 1962 trying to find a way to intercept long-range missiles. Our best scientists have failed repeatedly to build a system that works. In 1975, we actually fielded a system of 100 nuclear-tipped interceptors - only to have then-Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld shut it down five months later because it was militarily ineffective.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Amy Teibel, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israel has upgraded its top-tier Arrow II missile defense, a Defense Ministry official confirmed Sunday, as the country girds for possible attacks from Iran and Syria. Sensors, command and control equipment, and radar have been enhanced to improve reach and accuracy, the official confirmed without elaborating. He would not say how many Arrow II batteries are deployed around the country and spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the military's preparations.
NEWS
July 25, 2006 | By Jim Saxton
Less than two weeks ago, I and other members of the House Armed Services Committee received a secret briefing on the ballistic-missile programs of North Korea and Iran. The threat is growing. It is a scary reality that Iran and North Korea - sworn enemies of freedom, democracy, and the United States - are in relentless pursuit of intercontinental ballistic missiles and expanded nuclear weapons. But the Aegis system - developed right here in South Jersey - offers us the hope of deterring or defending against such missiles.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | By Craig Eisendrath
The Star Wars era of President Ronald Reagan passed with its broken promises of rendering missiles "impotent and obsolete. " Once again, President Bush has made national missile defense (NMD) a national priority at a cost that may exceed $150 billion in the next 10 years. Let us all remember a simple fact. None of the options Bush proposes - mid-course, boost-phase, and laser or energy-directed defenses - works, or shows the possibility of effective deployment for decades. Mid-course defense - that is, hitting the nuclear payload in outer space - has never solved the problem that decoys cannot be distinguished from payloads, that they cost less than one hundredth as much as anti-missiles, and are well within the technical reach of any country capable of launching an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM)
NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By Anne Gearan, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon announced Friday that it would strengthen the country's defenses against a possible attack by nuclear-equipped North Korea, fielding additional missile systems to protect the West Coast at a time of growing concern about the Stalinist regime. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said he would add 14 missile interceptors in Alaska, a roughly 50 percent increase over the current number there and in California. The estimated $1 billion expansion represents a policy shift for the Obama administration, which had shelved earlier plans to expand the mainland defense system.
NEWS
June 20, 2001 | By U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon
When George W. Bush made his first visit to Europe recently, it was like a rerun of Ronald Reagan's first visit to Europe in 1982, when a new president with a new defense vision faced skittish European leaders and a hostile Russia. What did Reagan do in the face of such opposition? He did what comes naturally to wise statesmen facing decisions of great consequence: He led the way. He faced down the protests, reassured our allies, called Moscow's bluff, and went ahead. President Bush faces a similar test.
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NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wendell G. Anderson, 86, a former RCA engineer, died of a heart attack Sunday, Dec. 22, at his home in the Medford Leas retirement community. Born in Columbia, Miss., Mr. Anderson earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering at Vanderbilt University. After serving as a postwar Army radar engineer in the Philippines, he taught electrical engineering at Syracuse University and then at Vanderbilt until he began his Radio Corp. of America career in 1955. In 1965, daughter Helen Anderson said, he created an amateur receiving station for weather satellite photos, which in 1966 earned him a place in stories in The Inquirer and the New York Times.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
ROME - Secretary of State John Kerry said Thursday that the transfer of advanced missile defense systems from Russia to Syria would be a "destabilizing" factor for Israel's security. Kerry said the United States has expressed concerns about what such defensive systems in Syria would mean for Israel's security. He wouldn't address what the missiles might mean for Syria's civil war. He spoke to reporters in Rome after the Wall Street Journal reported that Russia was preparing to sell the weapons to President Bashar al-Assad's regime.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gray and ominous, topped by radar turrets and satellite dishes, the USS Rancocas looks so like a warship it just might glide one day through the cornfields of Moorestown and out to sea. Up close, however, the landmark "cruiser in a cornfield" on Lockheed Martin Corp.'s vast campus reveals itself to be something of a scarecrow: a 122-foot-high deckhouse atop a gunless shed. Although a commissioned vessel of the U.S. Navy housing advanced combat equipment, it will always be a test site in landlocked Moorestown.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In response to increasingly hostile rhetoric from North Korea, the Pentagon said Wednesday it was deploying a missile-defense shield to Guam to protect the United States and its allies in the region. The North renewed its threat to launch a nuclear attack on the United States. The threat issued by the General Staff of the Korean People's Army capped a week of psychological warfare and military muscle moves by both sides that have rattled the region. On Wednesday, the Pentagon announced it would deploy a land-based, high-altitude missile-defense system to Guam to strengthen the Asia-Pacific region's protections against a possible attack.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
If North Korea were to launch a ballistic missile at the United States, the Aegis air-defense missile system designed and built by Lockheed Martin Corp. for ships could detect and strike it down within minutes. Not just hit the missile, but destroy the warhead and determine whether the threat was conventional explosives or chemical, biological, or nuclear in nature. For 40 years, Lockheed Martin in Moorestown has been the Navy's contractor for the Aegis system, which uses radar, sensors, and computers to detect, track, and guide weapons that can intercept enemy threats.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Vanessa Gera, Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - A U.S. plan to deploy missile defense interceptors to Poland and Romania has been a source of assurance to Washington's allies, who welcome further integration in a key U.S. security system. Meanwhile, it has infuriated Russia, which sees the interceptors as a threat and has cited them to block cooperation on nuclear arms reductions and other issues. So some might have expected the Russians to be relieved and the Poles to express anxiety at a plan announced last week by U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, which effectively cancels plans to put long-term interceptors in Poland in the next decade.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Anne Gearan, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon announced Friday that it would strengthen the country's defenses against a possible attack by nuclear-equipped North Korea, fielding additional missile systems to protect the West Coast at a time of growing concern about the Stalinist regime. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said he would add 14 missile interceptors in Alaska, a roughly 50 percent increase over the current number there and in California. The estimated $1 billion expansion represents a policy shift for the Obama administration, which had shelved earlier plans to expand the mainland defense system.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
By Stephen M. Walt If you were focused on Hurricane Isaac or the violence in Syria, you might have missed the latest round of threat inflation surrounding China. Last week, the New York Times reported that China was "increasing its existing ability to deliver nuclear warheads to the United States and to overwhelm missile defense systems. " Salon offered an even more breathless appraisal: that "the United States may be falling behind China when it comes to weapon technology. " What is really going on?
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