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NEWS
March 14, 2006 | By Steve Andreasen
"Given the possibility that intelligence about a fleeting target is wrong, erring with a conventional weapon is preferable to erring with a nuclear weapon, the strategic commander suggests. " Inside the Pentagon newsletter, Feb. 23 With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rationale for keeping thousands of nuclear weapons atop long-range ballistic missiles ready to fire within minutes has evaporated. Moreover, nuclear weapons have little if any relevance to the "Global War on Terrorism" - terrorists are unlikely to be deterred by fear of a U.S. nuclear attack, and the president is unlikely to order one. Reflecting these new realities, Gen. James Cartwright, commander of America's strategic nuclear forces, has embraced the concept of "Prompt Global Strike" - a Pentagon effort to develop the capability to attack terrorists or weapons of mass destruction worldwide within 60 minutes with conventional weapons.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Iran's batteries of Silkworm missiles, one of which apparently struck a U.S.-flagged tanker in Kuwaiti waters today, have raised the stakes in the Persian Gulf conflict. As the U.S. role in the gulf was intensifying this summer, the Reagan administration cautioned Iran against deploying mobile batteries of the Chinese-built weapons and refused to rule out pre-emptive strikes if the missiles were armed and prepared for launching. In June, President Reagan's national security adviser, Frank Carlucci, said: "The Silkworms clearly represent a threat.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | By Steve Twomey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Late 1983: Thousands of people linked hands across West Germany in a chain of protest. British women camped in the cold at a place called Greenham Common to dramatize their anger. Demonstrations shook the resolve of leaders in the Netherlands and Belgium. The cry was the same: "No more nukes. " Yet, despite the fiercest gale of dissension in NATO history, its leaders held to their plan and began installing U.S. medium-range nuclear missiles in Western Europe to offset similar Soviet rockets in Eastern Europe and to demonstrate America's commitment to defending its allies.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. military leaders are once again heralding the success of Tomahawk cruise missiles in strikes against Iraq, as technological upgrades are said to have improved the weapon's accuracy and decreased its vulnerability to enemy fire. Since conventional cruise missiles debuted during the Persian Gulf war in 1991, a satellite navigation system has been added to the weapons' technological bag of tricks. Using the same Global Positioning System used by airliners and even hikers, the missiles receive continuous guidance from 24 orbiting satellites to keep them on target.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney yesterday ordered the Air Force to keep short-range nuclear attack missiles off its bombers until safety studies show they will not leak lethal plutonium during a fire. Cheney's order grounds more than 1,000 Short-Range Attack Missiles, known as SRAM-As, that routinely are put aboard B-1, B-52 and FB-111 bombers standing on alert, armed, fueled and ready to take off within minutes. Because the missile has a very powerful propellant and a warhead containing sensitive high-explosive components to trigger a nuclear detonation, there has been concern in the Pentagon that a fire during a refueling exercise or other ground mishap might lead to an explosion that would disperse highly toxic plutonium for miles.
NEWS
January 18, 1991 | By Vernon Loeb and Martin Merzer, Inquirer Gulf Staff
Orna Kritzman was awakened this morning by the sound she least wanted to hear - an air-raid siren. She knew what she had to do: She grabbed a gas mask, fled into the back room of her modest home and sat down. Two minutes later, the middle-aged woman heard a shrieking whistle and was blown from her chair. A Scud missile - fired from Iraq - had struck 200 yards from her home in this suburb of Tel Aviv. The Offis Textile factory took a direct hit, blowing the tennis court-sized building apart and setting it afire.
SPORTS
March 12, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Two French-made, portable land-to-air missiles will be deployed outside South Korean stadiums during World Cup games to prevent possible terrorist attacks. Military jets will patrol the skies over the stadiums during the tournament, air force spokesman 1st Lt. Kim Ki-ho said yesterday. The air force will make sure jet noise does not affect matches, he said. The security plans are the latest in a series of measures being planned by South Korea officials to safeguard their portion of the tournament, to be played from May 31 to June 30. Five French special police-force members arrived in Seoul yesterday for five days of joint training with their South Korean counterparts.
NEWS
August 7, 2001
As the Soviet Union fell apart in the early 1990s, Boris Yeltsin and Mikhail Gorbachev liked to say that "the old system is dead. The new is has not yet been born. " After the Genoa summit, the Bush administration is saying something similar about arms control. The Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty is dead. The agreement to replace has not been born. President Bush has never wavered in saying he wants a new arms-control regime. Given the President's power, a new system was always likely to be established in one way or another.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
A team of 22 Soviet inspectors arrived here yesterday to begin making history by monitoring American compliance with the U.S.-Soviet Intermediate- Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty. Welcomed by a small group of military and state officials and a dozen Utah schoolchildren waving balloons, the Soviets issued a brief statement. They then were taken by Air Force bus to the Salt Lake City apartment complex where they will stay when they are not manning a full-time inspection post at the nearby Hercules Aerospace Inc. missile plant.
NEWS
October 11, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The United States has begun deploying cruise missiles in West Germany, a government official announced yesterday. During a news conference, spokesman Friedhelm Ost said that the first contingent of the missiles arrived in March at the U.S. Air Force's 38th Tactical Missile Wing base at Hasselbach, about 20 miles south of Koblenz, and that some missiles had been deployed. Ost's statement was the first official announcement of the missiles' arrival and deployment. He did not say how many of the missiles had arrived or when the first missiles were deployed.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Milton H. Lowe, 89, formerly of Cherry Hill, a former program manager for the Aegis missile guidance program in Moorestown, died of complications from heart failure on Monday, Feb. 1, at the Neighborhood Hospice in West Chester. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Lowe graduated from Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan and at 17 became a Navy aviation electronic technician, serving shipboard during World War II in San Diego, Calif., and off Bermuda. When he returned to civilian life, he studied electrical engineering at the Cooper Union in Manhattan before earning a bachelor's in physics at La Salle University.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Kosich, 84, of Cherry Hill, who retired as a missile systems engineer at Lockheed Martin in Moorestown, died of dementia on Thursday, Oct. 29, at CareOne at Evesham, an assisted-living center in Marlton. Mr. Kosich grew up in the Port Richmond neighborhood of Philadelphia, graduated from Northeast High School in 1948, and earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania in 1952. He was an engineer in the Camden offices of Radio Corp.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
For William E. Scull Jr., tracking test missile flights for RCA while stationed on Kwajalein Atoll in the South Pacific in the 1960s was no hardship. "He was having the time of his life," said his daughter, Sandra Plunkett. "He would get on a small plane every morning and fly up the atoll to get to work, probably a 20-minute commuter flight" to another piece of the atoll, she said. Mr. Scull worked on Kwajalein as a project engineer from 1964 to 1966 and as the project manager there from 1968 to 1970, with a two-year break for an RCA assignment near Boston.
NEWS
July 29, 2014 | BY ANN McFEATTERS
WASHINGTON - When historians look back on 2014, they will note not just how flagrantly Vladimir Putin disregarded international law or how stubbornly Gaza and Israel kept firing missiles at each other. They also will be puzzled at how poorly the United States handled its economy. They undoubtedly will conclude that 2014 was a year of missed opportunities. The world's record in dealing with bullies and tyrants has not been good; it remains to be seen if economic sanctions work with the lawless Putin, whose takeover of Crimea has led to a series of disasters for scores of innocent people.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lockheed Martin Corp. has given layoff notices to 240 employees at its operation Moorestown. The workers were notified last week, and for most their last day will be next Wednesday. About 3,500 employees will remain at the Burlington County site, Lockheed Martin spokesman Keith D. Little said. The layoffs were part of a nationwide workforce reduction announced Oct. 16 totaling 587 in Lockheed's Mission Systems and Training business, Little said. The layoffs were "necessary to address continuing challenges in our business environment, including continued uncertain program funding, delays in contract awards, and an extremely competitive market," Little said.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Josef Federman, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israel's prime minister insisted Sunday that he would not allow "dangerous weapons" to reach Lebanon's Hezbollah militants, following reports that Israel recently carried out an airstrike in northern Syria against a shipment of advanced missiles. The airstrike in Latakia reportedly targeted Russian Yakhont antiship missiles, one of the types of advanced weapons that Israeli officials have previously said they would not allow to reach Syria. It would be the fourth known airstrike against Syria this year.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Syria's rebels have received shipments of more powerful weapons from Persian Gulf allies in recent weeks, particularly antitank and antiaircraft missiles, that have already helped stall aggressive new advances by regime forces. But those same shipments have sparked feuding and squabbling among rebel factions, illustrating the complications the United States will face as it starts directly arming the rebels, a major policy shift by the Obama administration. Every shipment enters a tangle of complex rebel politics, with dozens of brigades and battalions operating on the ground, riven by jealousies, rivalries and competition, with radical Islamist fighters dominant.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Frank Eltman, Associated Press
MINEOLA, N.Y. - Former investigators are pushing to reopen the probe into the 1996 crash of TWA Flight 800 off the coast of New York, saying new evidence points to the often-discounted theory that a missile strike may have downed the jumbo jet. The New York-to-Paris flight crashed July 17, 1996, just minutes after the Boeing 747 took off from John F. Kennedy Airport, killing all 230 people aboard. The effort to reopen the probe is being made in tandem with the release next month of a documentary that features the testimony of former investigators who raise doubts about the National Transportation Safety Board's conclusion that the crash was caused by a center fuel tank explosion, probably caused by a spark from a short-circuit in the wiring.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Officers with a finger on the trigger of the Air Force's most powerful nuclear missiles are complaining of a wide array of morale-sapping pressures, according to internal e-mails obtained by the Associated Press. The complaints shed fresh light on dissatisfactions roiling this critical arm of the Air Force, an undercurrent that has captured the attention of the service's leaders. Key themes among the complaints include working under "poor leadership" and being stuck in "dead-end careers" in nuclear weapons, one e-mail said.
NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Zeina Karam and Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Syrian President Bashar al-Assad said in an interview broadcast Thursday that he is "confident in victory" in his country's civil war, and he warned that Damascus would retaliate for any future Israeli air strike on his territory. Assad also told the Lebanese TV station Al-Manar that Russia has fulfilled some of its weapons contracts recently, but he was vague on whether this included advanced S-300 air-defense systems. The comments were in line with a forceful and confident message the regime has been sending in recent days, even as the international community attempts to launch a peace conference in Geneva, possibly next month.
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