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Mission

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BUSINESS
August 15, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Just two years ago, Shreyas Parab was such a shy, unassuming teenager that it pained him to make eye contact. Now the 15-year-old from Aston, Delaware County, wears ties declaring himself a chick magnet and a stud muffin. And he's running a company that has sold nearly 600 of those novelty ties for close to $17,000 in its first 14 months of business, tapping into a market where whimsy is popular. Parab also makes pitches to investor panels, and has met with Sam's Club executives in Bentonville, Ark., hoping to get his Novel Tie line in their stores.
NEWS
September 13, 1997 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
Nation of Islam Minister Benjamin Muhammad, the former Ben Chavis, announces the Nation's plan for blacks and Latinos to mark the second anniversary of the Million Man March, Oct. 15, by skipping work and taking part in interfaith events.
NEWS
January 15, 2004
NASA AND ITS scientists are basking in the glow of the current successful mission to Mars. But what benefits will accrue to those who are paying the bills, the present generation? Looking at these missions pragmatically, there's very little to cheer about, and whatever good they will accomplish is years away. If the brain power dedicated to this mission was diverted to the production of a reasonably priced theft-proof auto, then most Americans could understand the need to spend huge sums for research.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
A respected mission for the homeless here has filed for bankruptcy after the minister who formerly ran it was indicted on charges of molesting a 10- year-old girl, the mission's acting director said yesterday. Mission of Care, Inc. "was heading (toward bankruptcy) anyway" before its former director, the Rev. William J. Keichline, was arrested March 13, said David Cushworth, the acting director. "What little support we did have coming in (from donations) dried up after his arrest," Cushworth said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2010
7:30 tonight FX Tom Cruise performs some remarkable physical stunts under the guidance of director John Woo in this 2000 sequel also starring Dougray Scott as the bad guy and Thandie Newton (right) as a woman with romantic links to both men.
SPORTS
November 14, 1993 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The text of this document is unavailable. Please refer to the microfilm for Sunday, November 14, 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Mission," a historical drama starring Robert DeNiro and Jeremy Irons. Original story and screenplay by Robert Bolt. Music composed by Ennio Morricone. Directed by Roland Joffe. Opening tomorrow at the Budco Olde City. "The Mission" is an Important Picture. The cast is headed not by "Hollywood Stars," but by Serious Actors: Robert DeNiro, Jeremy Irons and Ray McAnally. Screenwriter Robert Bolt wrote "Dr. Zhivago," "Lawrence of Arabia," "A Man for All Seasons. " Director Roland Joffe's last film was "The Killing Fields.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Some bands are like sports teams - definitive traveling representatives of their cities' personalities. With each gig they play, the very best musical ensembles bring along every weird, proud taste their hometowns have to offer. Few acts have been so connected to a city as Boston's Mission of Burma. Since the band's 1979 start and initial volley of such verifiable post-punk hits as "Academy Fight Song" and "That's When I Reach for My Revolver," guitarist Roger Miller, bassist Clint Conley, and drummer Peter Prescott have emboldened Boston's club scene and given it a vibe and reputation based on a sound fancifully art schoolish and dramatically angular without being tart or grandiose.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Passion is the little something something that Brendan Olkhus brings to the turntable. "I love what I do. I can't not do it," said Olkhus - or DJ Brendan, as he is known around town. "We're not in it for the money. . . . If [the people] knew how little we made, they would choke. " Despite sometimes uneducated venue management in the city, the Soul Travelers - Brendan, DJ Joey Blanco, and Daniel "Gravy" Thomas - have been successful, minus publicity or gimmicks. It is a success Brendan refers to as "underground.
NEWS
February 13, 1990
He was a rare find, all right. Dr. Phillip Hamilton, still young and vigorous at 50, was the first black to serve as chairman of Temple University Hospital's obstetrics and gynecology department. He'd lit up the place in the brief months he'd spent there, had picky, hard-to-impress types calling him "a hero. " And when, sadly, it came time for his memorial service last week, the crowd came close to causing a fire hazard. Dr. Hamilton had arrived from the University of Wisconsin only last spring.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 15, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Just two years ago, Shreyas Parab was such a shy, unassuming teenager that it pained him to make eye contact. Now the 15-year-old from Aston, Delaware County, wears ties declaring himself a chick magnet and a stud muffin. And he's running a company that has sold nearly 600 of those novelty ties for close to $17,000 in its first 14 months of business, tapping into a market where whimsy is popular. Parab also makes pitches to investor panels, and has met with Sam's Club executives in Bentonville, Ark., hoping to get his Novel Tie line in their stores.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | Cynthia Burton, Inquirer editorial writer
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) has an interesting analysis of why President Obama has had trouble moving his agenda. Sanders says an inspired grassroots coalition swept Obama to victory. But after his election, the president devoted himself to the work of being a president without tending enough to the grassroots activists who had helped elect him. "Obama got elected and said: 'Hey, thank you so much for your help. I'll take it from here.' And I think that was a tactical mistake," Sanders noted when he spoke to the editorial boards of the Inquirer and Daily News in April.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITER
On the floor of the Democratic National Convention , Gov. Wolf took the microphone Tuesday and played a small part in writing the history books for the first woman to cinch a major party nomination for president. Breaking into a smile during the delegate roll call, Wolf told the crowd: "I am honored to announce that Pennsylvania awards 126 votes to the next president of the United States, Hillary Clinton. " The question now becomes: Can he help deliver the state for Clinton in November?
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
It's a hairy moment for Lt. Cmdr. Montgomery "Scotty" Scott: The crew of the Starship Enterprise has crashed on an unknown, unfriendly planet, and the spacecraft's chief engineer, separated from Kirk and Spock and the rest of the gang, is dangling from a cliff, an abyss below. We never get to see how Scotty extricates himself from the situation, but - no spoiler here - he does. "Sheer forearm strength," says Simon Pegg, explaining how the Starfleet engineer from Aberdeen hoists himself from the precipice.
NEWS
July 23, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
In an afternoon protest outside Hillary Clinton's Center City campaign headquarters, a familiar message - stop police violence against minorities - was delivered by an unexpected messenger: ACT UP. Anyone who lived through the 1980s and '90s remembers how in-your-face AIDS activists around the country forced the government, pharmaceutical companies, and much of America to confront an epidemic that was devastating gay communities. But chapter after chapter gradually closed as early victims of the disease died off and later ones, mostly gay white men, got the new drugs that turned AIDS into a chronic disease from a death sentence.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
Tucked between sleek urban office buildings and the historic red brick of Center City is now a taste of wildlife. On Wednesday, a team of high school students with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service planted flowers in a plot they have been working on since March. The area, several feet of dirt between a stone wall and benches just outside the Free Quaker Meeting House at Fifth and Arch Streets, was once just fallen leaves and soil riddled with English ivy. Now, this strip of Independence National Historical Park is blooming with bee balm, a stringy red petal flower that hummingbirds like to poke their beaks into, and purple coneflowers, a favorite of bees.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
The Rev. Joseph Capella has gotten to know the people of Lindenwold during the last 13 years - and many of them aren't even part of his church. "I go to the diner, Wawa, I hang out at the Dunkin' Donuts - that's where I do so much ministry," said Capella, pastor of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish Shrine at St. Lawrence Church in Lindenwold. "Some days I'll park my car and just walk. That's where you meet a lot of people. " He's heard confession in parking lots, has baptized people he has met, and goes to Little League games in addition to serving at his church.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
The continuing conversation on Campbell Soup Co. turns on how this classic food company, built on canned condensed soup, can respond to the trend toward fresh and organic. "I've bought companies in response to the seismic shifts - the consumer preference for food and health and well-being, and a gravitation toward more fresh and natural and organic," said Denise Morrison, 62, Campbell Soup's chief executive. They were "Bolthouse Farms, which got me into the fresh juice and carrots and salad dressing; Garden Fresh Gourmet, which got me fresh salsa and hummus.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The young woman became a U.S. citizen 15 years ago. But her husband, the father of her two children, is undocumented. During a visit to the Mexican consulate in Philadelphia, the Delaware couple share their story with Jeffrey S. DeCristofaro and Evelyn Sabando, who are making a presentation about the services of the Camden Center for Law and Social Justice. At the center's downtown Camden office, meanwhile, Lisa M. Incollingo handles cases like those of a Gloucester Township senior citizen and a Camden mother of five, both of whom recently got protection from an abusive family member.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Thirty years ago, when medicine could do little for people with HIV, Kevin J. Burns was a volunteer in a buddy system where buddies never came back. "By and large, we did hospice care, helping people die with dignity," Burns said in recalling the early days of ActionAIDS, which grew into one of the largest and best recognized HIV services organizations in Philadelphia. When lifesaving drugs became available, a priority became getting them to clients. Gradually, as people lived longer, the organization provided more services to manage a range of chronic diseases - HIV being a key one, but not the only one - that afflicted its patients.
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