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NEWS
July 14, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The leader of a team of Pennsylvania missionaries who were injured in Sunday's terror bombings in Uganda has written a firsthand account of the episode. "I remember a bright flash and everything went grey and it felt like rain," Lori Ssebulime, of Selinsgrove, Pa., wrote from Kampala, replying on her blog to questions from The Inquirer. "...I heard screaming from every direction. " Ssebulime is still in Africa, monitoring the medical care of five team members who were wounded by one of two blasts that shook Kampala on Sunday, killing 74 people.
NEWS
November 28, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Foot soldiers backed by helicopter gunships searched the Matabeleland bush yesterday for rebels who hacked 16 missionaries and their families to death, reportedly in an effort to "drive Western capitalist-oriented people" from Zimbabwe. Prime Minister Robert Mugabe said security forces were mobilized to "track these bloody evil-doers and bring them to justice" for the "unbridled savagery" of their attack late Wednesday on the missionaries' 10,000-acre settlement, the semi-official Zimbabwe Inter-African News Agency reported.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
During 28 years in West Africa, the Rev. Eugene E. Grau and his wife, Dorothy, witnessed dramatic political and social changes. They saw the Gold Coast, a colony administered as part of British Togoland, become the independent Republic of Ghana, a nation torn by coups, revolts and economic hardship. But it wasn't until last fall, 15 years after the Graus left Ghana, that they returned and saw the full measure of religious change - change for which they had worked so hard as Evangelical Presbyterian missionaries.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Representatives of Western religion get another flogging in "At Play in the Fields of the Lord," the latest movie to heap derision on Christian emissaries looking for converts among this hemisphere's native peoples. The movie features the line: "Maybe we're in hell and just don't know it. " If you wish to spare yourself this feeling, then maybe you ought to pass on "At Play in the Fields of the Lord," which uses more than three hours of film to belabor the idea that European religious ideas are lost on natives of the Amazon region.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six of 15 missionaries from Selinsgrove who went to Uganda June 16 to help build a wall around a church and school were due to return home July 7 but stayed to complete the work, a church spokesman said today. The six had reasoned that "we've got time. We'll just stay," according to Gerald Wolgemuth, director of communications for the Susquehanna Conference of the United Methodist Church. While nine members of the team arrived home July 7 in Pennsylvania, the others' decision proved fateful: They were at a garden restaurant Sunday in Kampala watching the final match of the World Cup when terrorists set off a bomb beneath a table.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Sister Anne Bickford embarks on her journey to Chad, Africa, she will have to leave her beloved viola behind. The hot, dry climate is not instrument-friendly. It's a sacrifice, but one she is making happily, said the nun, who was a professional musician and member of the Pittsburgh Symphony before entering the Society of the Holy Child Jesus 36 years ago. "I'm very happy to be going," she said. "I think this trip is what my whole life has been striving for. " She and Sister Melinda Keane have volunteered to serve as missionaries in N'Djamena, the capital of Chad.
NEWS
June 7, 2005 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Army Capt. Charles D. Robinson's life spanned the globe. The son of missionaries based in Haddon Heights, Robinson spent much of his life in Paraguay, where he developed a love of languages and a bond with other Americans stationed overseas. At Baptist Regional School in Haddon Heights, Robinson played soccer and kept in touch with friends after his family resumed their travels. And after the Special Forces sent him to Afghanistan in January as part of Operation Enduring Freedom, Robinson asked his family to mail him care packages of candy.
NEWS
May 26, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rev. Roque Longo, 88, the founding pastor of Our Lady of Fatima parish in Camden and the first of the Missionaries of the Sacred Hearts to begin work in the United States, died Friday at Our Lady's Residence, Pleasantville. Born in Molinara, Italy, Father Longo was ordained into the priesthood in 1933 and studied at Lateran University in Rome, earning degrees in canon and civil law. In 1935, he began 14 years of service to the church in South America, where he founded several chapels in Uruguay and a school and a seminary in Argentina.
NEWS
November 7, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Episcopal Academy will host a program called "China: Where Is It Going and Why?" at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the theater on the Merion campus, 376 N. Latches Lane. The Rev. Peyton Craighill of Narberth and his wife, Mary Craighill, will be the speakers. Both Craighills were born in China and lived there when they were young. They were missionaries in Taiwan for 19 years. Father Craighill is a former chaplain at the academy. SEMINARS The Rev. Peter Gomes, professor of Christian morals at Harvard University, is the theologian-in-residence Thursday and Nov. 14 and 16 at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, 625 Montgomery Ave. At 6:30 p.m. Thursday, there will be a dinner in Congregation Hall at the church, followed by his talk at 7:30 p.m. in the sanctuary.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel H. Moffett, 98, who after completing a missionary career in China and Korea was a professor at his alma mater, Princeton Theological Seminary, died Monday, Feb. 9, at the Princeton Windrows retirement community. Dr. Moffett was the Henry Winters Luce Professor of Ecumenics and Mission there from 1981 to 1987, when he retired, according to seminary communications director Michelle Roemer-Schoen. Born of missionary parents in Pyongyang, now the capital of North Korea, Dr. Moffett earned a bachelor's summa cum laude in the classics at Wheaton (Ill.)
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NEWS
March 9, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE REV. Vaughn Wilson left his Chester church in 1988 because "the people did not want to follow the word of God" and came to Southwest Philadelphia with his family, one prospective member of his future congregation and no church. He found a vacant building on Woodland Avenue near 71st Street that had last existed as a candy factory in the '70s. "We rented one room," Wilson said. "We painted, hung curtains and found chairs. It was winter. There was no heat. "So every Saturday, I rented an old construction heater at Front and Hunting Park, strapped it on the back of my car, carried it to Woodland Avenue, filled it with kerosene and heated up the room," Wilson said.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel H. Moffett, 98, who after completing a missionary career in China and Korea was a professor at his alma mater, Princeton Theological Seminary, died Monday, Feb. 9, at the Princeton Windrows retirement community. Dr. Moffett was the Henry Winters Luce Professor of Ecumenics and Mission there from 1981 to 1987, when he retired, according to seminary communications director Michelle Roemer-Schoen. Born of missionary parents in Pyongyang, now the capital of North Korea, Dr. Moffett earned a bachelor's summa cum laude in the classics at Wheaton (Ill.)
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If anyone is having a Best Decade Ever, it's composer Robert Lopez. Along with 2013's powerhouse Frozen ($1.2 billion worldwide box office, the highest-grossing animated film ever) for which he cowrote songs with wife, Kristen Anderson-Lopez, and his controversial Broadway smash written with South Park 's creators, The Book of Mormon , at the Forrest Theatre starting on Tuesday, the 39-year-old is an EGOT (winner of an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony) - and the youngest at that.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Betty C. Dorris, 63, of Oreland, a Christian missionary, died Tuesday, April 16, of ovarian cancer at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Mrs. Dorris felt called as a young adult to serve as a missionary, said her husband, the Rev. Roger Dorris, a minister with the Evangelical Free Church of America. While in college, she spent a summer in Spain as a missionary, and she continued the work here and abroad throughout her life, her husband said. After graduating from Norristown High School and from Columbia University with a degree in physical therapy, she enrolled in a certificate program at Philadelphia College of Bible.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Seamen's Church Institute has been a fixture on the Philadelphia waterfront for nearly 170 years, providing friendly help each year to 40,000 seafarers whose ships dock in ports along the Delaware. Soon, the interdenominational ministry will have a new head chaplain and executive director: the Rev. Peter B. Stube, 61, an Episcopal priest who served 13 years as rector of the Church of the Redeemer in Springfield, Delaware County. For the last decade, he has been rector of Christ Church of New Bern, N.C., the second-largest parish in the Diocese of East Carolina.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Alderfer Auction and Appraisal's summer doll sale this month is aptly named "The Gathering. " The two-day, 500-lot event on Aug. 21 and 22 will bring together not only Barbies and Madame Alexanders from the United States, Lencis from Italy, Schoenhuts and Heubachs from Germany, and even a pair of Hansel and Gretel dolls from France once in the collection of Ann Wyeth McCoy, but also three rare Door of Hope Dolls from a far more remote source: Imperial...
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
ALFRED "BUTCHY" Turner Jr. was an award-winning graphic artist whose commitment to his religion led him to serve a community that reached from West Philadelphia to Guatemala.   As an active member of Bible Way Baptist Church, Alfred worked tirelessly within the church. But he and his wife, the former Natalie Williams, also traveled to Guatemala as missionaries, not only to spread the word of their Christian faith but to pitch in to build facilities that the people needed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
IN "MACHINE GUN Preacher," truth is so much stranger than fiction that fiction eventually throws in the towel. The movie is based on the wild, wild life of a Johnstown, Pa., man named Sam Childers, who went from meth user/dealer to fundamentalist preacher to gun-toting missionary in the Sudan. Childers (Gerard Butler) is a different sort of Christian. In Sudan, when he turns the other cheek, it's to steady the rifle butt he's using to gun down Africans who are abducting children for conscription into warlord armies fighting over territory in southern Sudan and northern Uganda.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Ethel P. Moore, an 18-year employee of the Philadelphia Gas Works and a deaconess and missionary at Canaan Baptist Church in Germantown, died March 6 of lung cancer. She was 70 and lived in Mount Airy. She was born in West Point, Miss., to Ellis Rice and the former Mary Alice West. She came to Philadelphia in 1952 and graduated from the Benjamin Franklin Standard Evening School. She married Clifton McCrea Moore on June 13, 1964. Ethel worked as a customer-service representative for PGW for 18 years.
NEWS
January 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
H. Clifton Russell, 79, a missionary in Peru for more than 20 years who became an expert horticulturist in Bucks County, died of melanoma Sunday, Jan. 9, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Russell had been in Peru for three years when he and another missionary, James Davidson, spotted a village of the indigenous Isconahuas from the air. They journeyed by motorized canoe and then hiked for three days to reach the tribe. With some difficulty, they became friendly with the tribe and lived with it for a year.
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