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NEWS
January 3, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Ghosts of Mississippi" demonstrates just how deeply perverse racial politics in Hollywood have become. The movie, the story of a white prosecutor's belated pursuit of the Klansman who assassinated civil-rights leader Medgar Evers in the early 1960s, is the brainchild of Rob Reiner, a commercially successful director who has sought for years to make a movie about one of his civil-rights heroes. Reiner felt that he could not make a movie about Evers himself, or about his widow, Myrlie.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | By ANDY ROONEY
We went to see Mississippi Burning. The movie tells the story, in fictionalized form, of three young civil rights activists who went from New York to Mississippi in 1964 where they were murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan. For me, it evoked a nightmare of memories of one of the most dramatic and dangerous episodes of my life. As a producer for 60 Minutes in 1969, I had set out to find a man named Byron De La Beckwith, known to his friends as "Dee Lay. " Beckwith, I have no qualms in saying, even though he was never convicted of the crime and is still alive, murdered a black activist named Medgar Evers in 1963.
SPORTS
July 17, 2011 | Associated Press
MADISON, Miss. - PGA Tour rookie Chris Kirk shot an 8-under-par 64 Saturday to take a 1-stroke lead into the final round of the Viking Classic at Annandale Golf Club. Kirk was at 18 under. Sunghoon Kang, D.J. Trahan, George McNeill, and Peter Lonard were tied for second. The 26-year-old Kirk has been one of the Tour's most successful rookies this season, finishing second to Phil Mickelson in the Shell Houston Open.   Celebrity Tournament STATELINE, Nev. - Actor Jack Wagner extended his lead with four birdies, and Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo moved into second place in the American Century Celebrity Golf Championship at Lake Tahoe.
NEWS
November 10, 2012
Ellen Douglas, 91, a Mississippi native whose novel Apostles of Light was a 1973 National Book Award nominee, died Wednesday after an extended illness, in Jackson, Miss. Ellen Douglas, who cited fellow Mississippi native William Faulkner as a literary influence, was the pen name of Josephine Ayres Haxton; she took a pseudonym, she said, to guard the privacy of her family. Ms. Douglas' Mississippi-set work dealt candidly with race relations, families, and the role of women. Ms. Douglas grew up in Hope, Ark., and Alexandria, La., and spent summers with her grandparents in Natchez, Miss., where the family's roots reached back generations.
SPORTS
September 7, 2009 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Jevan Snead recovered from a poor start to throw two touchdowns to lead No. 8 Mississippi to a 45-14 victory over host Memphis yesterday. Snead struggled for three quarters before breaking open a close game with scoring passes of 17 and 18 yards to Dexter McCluster and Markeith Summers. Fon Ingram returned an interception 35 yards for a TD for the Rebels, who opened the season ranked higher than they have been since 1970. Night games. In Saturday's late games, No. 5 Alabama topped No. 7 Virginia Tech by 34-24, No. 11 Louisiana State outlasted Washington, 31-23; and No. 12 California blasted Maryland, 52-13.
NEWS
February 8, 1994
Lynchings, firebombings, assaults and murders, committed with impunity: Those horrendous acts became synonomous with the image of Mississippi 30 years ago, thanks to the violence and injustices perpetrated there against leaders of the civil rights movement. But the state may have begun the process of closure on its bitter history last weekend, when a jury found white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith guilty of the murder of NAACP leader Medgar Evers in 1963. Just as victims of the Holocaust have had to fight for years to bring killers to justice, Mr. Evers' widow, the NAACP and white supporters had to fight to get Mississippi to retry Beckwith, who repeatedly boasted of shooting Mr. Evers to death outside his own home.
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | BY ROBERT C. MAYNARD
If it were possible, I would take any leader of South Africa's apartheid regime on a remarkable human journey. Apartheid's apologists forever sing the same song: Whites and blacks cannot live and work together in equality without a "bloodbath. " Here is the journey on which I would take them. It would trace the career of John Stennis of Mississippi over the 40 years since he was elected to the U.S. Senate. It is a career that illustrates more powerfully than any civil rights sermon why racial justice is more than just good morals.
NEWS
September 7, 2005
TO THE GREAT citizens of Philadelphia: I can't begin to thank you for the outstanding support you have shown for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. I was born and raised in South Philly (30th and Tasker) and came to Mississippi to go to college. But I will always consider myself a damn Yankee from South Philly. The Mississippi residents most affected by this disaster are a lot like you. They are hard-working, devoted, loyal, sports-loving people. Most of them would give you the shirt off their back if you needed it. I remember many times in my neighborhood growing up, when families needed help, everyone would do whatever they could to help.
SPORTS
April 7, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
Jim Booros of Allentown shot a 6-under-par 64 yesterday to take a 1-stroke lead after the first round of the $200,000 PGA Deposit Guaranty Golf Classic in Hattiesburg, Miss. Booros, 37, ended with six birdies and a dozen pars over the 6,280-yard Hattiesburg Country Club Course for a 1-shot edge over Robert Thompson, Rocco Mediate and Barry Cheesman. Mediate had one more birdie than Booros but also had a pair of bogeys. Thompson had seven birdies but was hurt by a double bogey on the par-4 10th hole, where he hit into the water.
SPORTS
March 15, 1997 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
We've seen this game before. It was another NCAA Tournament opener for Temple, against another unsuspecting opponent that had never faced anything remotely resembling John Chaney's matchup zone. And it quickly turned into one more first-round victory for the ninth-seeded Owls. The victim this time was an eighth-seeded Mississippi team that was making its first NCAA appearance in 16 years, and second ever. The final last night at the Kemper Arena was 62-40. The Rebels broke a 39-year-old record for fewest points scored in a Midwest Regional.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
Emma Sanders was late to the Mississippi delegation's breakfast Tuesday, almost skipped it altogether, the exhausting first night of the Democratic National Convention having taken its toll on the great-grandmother. But when she finally arrived, she was in fine spirits, ready to talk about the momentous time in Atlantic City, when she was a Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party delegate. It has been 52 years. The 1964 convention in Boardwalk Hall was the last time the Democratic Party held its national gathering in the area, and the bad reviews that came out of Atlantic City were a punch to the gut for the resort.
NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Chris Palmer and Amy S. Rosenberg, STAFF WRITERS
Mississippi's state flag didn't last long on Broad Street in South Philadelphia. City workers on Monday removed the red, white, and blue banner - which has the Confederate flag in the top left corner - from a lighting standard near Passyunk Avenue after dozens of protesters and some local residents asked for it to be taken down, city officials said. It had been put up about two weeks ago among a collection of state flags on South Broad. It won't be put up again, said Brian Abernathy, a deputy managing director for the city, who said, "The Confederate flag raises strong feelings in our city.
NEWS
February 4, 2016
AS GOV. WOLF prepares to go back to the well (or the pit) of the legislature with a new (?) budget plan, it seems a good time to take an independent look at the state of our state. You know Wolf's view: education crisis, fiscal crisis, need new taxes to avoid a "train-wreck" crisis. You know the GOP legislature's view: Things aren't that bad, don't need new taxes, and (for real Republicans) need to cut government spending. As in most things with politicians, truth is somewhere in the middle.
TRAVEL
January 17, 2016
Answer: Texas. Also called the Red River of the South, it begins in the Texas Panhandle and eventually empties roughly 1,360 miles away into the Atchafalaya and Mississippi Rivers.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before the advanced degrees, money, and accolades, he was just a kid growing up farming cotton with seven siblings, his mother, and his father, who was the son of an ex-slave in Mississippi. Benjamin Nero grew up just miles away in Mississippi from where teenager Emmett Till was beaten to death. Born in 1937, Nero was a high school football star who played in college and was recruited to play professionally. He remains close with childhood friend Morgan Freeman, the award-winning actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2015 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
A strange current runs through Mississippi Grind , the story of two bottom-rung gamblers on a multistate binge. It's something like affectionate nostalgia. The movie floats in a bubble of old blues music and lost country songs. The gamblers themselves (Ryan Reynolds, Ben Mendelsohn) literally float on riverboats, down the Mississippi from St. Louis to New Orleans, along the way playing sidetrack-betting parlors, eating at barbecue joints, drinking in dive bars. The movie is a snapshot collage of flyover America, but also, perhaps, an homage to the soon-to-be-lost world of brick-and-mortar gambling.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | BY HANS BADER
PENNSYLVANIA Attorney General Kathleen Kane was indicted on Aug. 6, but she's not stepping down. Despite being charged with perjury, official oppression, obstruction of justice, contempt of court, and calls for her resignation from the governor and newspapers all over the state, she has clung to her position like driftwood. In a scene worthy of a bad soap opera, she asked her twin sister to act as a decoy to avoid facing reporters when she appeared in court. After reviewing the evidence, a judge ordered her to stand trial on all four charges.
NEWS
July 31, 2015
CALL IT A PANDEMIC of public corruption. It's gripping Philadelphia and Pennsylvania. Elected leaders are probed, charged, convicted, jailed, etc. in stupendously striking succession. A stark irony? The city and state where American democracy was born is setting the national pace for illegality in office. You get the damage this causes, right? It undermines faith in government, faith in politics, faith in all elected officials. It spurs cynicism. It fuels frustration with those who fail at creating progress but succeed spectacularly at creating scandal.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2015 | By Roberta Sandler, For The Inquirer
CLARKSDALE, Miss. - In the 1930s, a mediocre young guitar player stopped at a rural Mississippi crossroads at midnight to sell his soul to the devil. In return, Satan gifted him with wondrous skill. So goes the legend of the real-life Robert Johnson, seminal bluesman - "the master" in worshipper Eric Clapton's words. Today, Johnson's name beckons from roadside markers along a magical meander called the Mississippi Blues Trail. Wending through not only the Mississippi Delta and environs but down through the decades, back more than a century to the birth of the blues, the path was trod as well by Big Joe Williams, David "Honeyboy" Edwards, Muddy Waters, Charley Patton, Johnny Young, B.B. King, John Lee Hooker, Howlin' Wolf, and so many other icons-to-be looking for a way out of the dim-lit, whisky-soaked juke joints and the destitution of the Deep South.
SPORTS
November 20, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
MISSISSIPPI STATE, which had been No. 1 in the first three College Football Playoff polls, finally lost on Saturday at Alabama. So you figured there would be some movement in Week 4. And there was. Alabama moved up from fifth to the top spot. It's the first time the Crimson Tide has been in the first four. MSU, meanwhile, slipped to fourth. Which means if the inaugural playoff started tomorrow, the Bulldogs would still be in. And that's all that really matters. Oregon and Florida State, the lone remaining major unbeatens  unbeaten (sorry, Marshall)
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