CollectionsMissouri River
IN THE NEWS

Missouri River

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - The Army Corps of Engineers on Friday began reducing the flow from a Missouri River reservoir, a move expected to worsen low-water conditions on the Mississippi River and potentially bring barge traffic to a halt within weeks. The Missouri flows into the Mississippi around a bend north of St. Louis. One result of this year's drought, the worst in decades, has been a big drop in water levels on both rivers. The corps announced this month that it would reduce the outflow from the Gavins Point Dam near Yankton, S.D., to protect the upper Missouri basin.
SPORTS
December 19, 1989 | This feature was written by Donnat Grillet, Division of Social Studies, District Four, School District of Philadelphia. The graphics were conceived by Donnat Grillet and executed by Daily News staff artist Bruny Roldan. The page was edited by Jerry Carrier of the Daily News
HERE'S THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS Key Physical Features: Rocky Mountains, Bitterroot Mountains, Uinta Mountains, Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Big Horn Mountains, Tetons, Missouri River, Snake River, Colorado River, Rio Grande River, Arkansas River, South Platte River, Great Salt Lake, Black Rock Desert, Sonora Desert, Painted Desert. MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARKS --- Glacier --- Yellowstone --- Carlsbad Caverns --- Bryce Canyon --- Grand Teton --- Mesa Verde --- Canyonlands --- Petrified Forest --- Zion --- Grand Canyon --- Rocky Mountain CHECK IT OUT When we think of the Mountain Region, we usually think of thick forests, bears and beautiful mountain peaks.
NEWS
July 30, 2012
Cheney: 'Mistake' to choose Palin Former Vice President Dick Cheney said it was "a mistake" for Arizona Sen. John McCain to pick Sarah Palin as his vice-presidential running mate in 2008. Cheney led George W. Bush's vice-presidential search in 2000 before becoming Bush's running mate. Of the GOP selection process four years ago that led to Palin, he said, "That one I don't think was well-handled. " Palin hadn't "passed that test" of readiness to serve as president because her political experience was limited, Cheney said in an interview with ABC News.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The National Weather Service yesterday warned that California may be hit hard by drought this year although most of the nation should be spared from dry conditions as severe as in 1988. Water shortages also could plague New York City, Boston, the upper Delaware River Basin and parts of Georgia, South Carolina and southern Florida, the service said. Michael Hudlow, hydrology director at the weather service, said that snowfall had been below normal in Northern California this winter and that the state's average reservoir storage was only 50 percent of normal.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2012 | By Jim Suhr and Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Barge operators along a key stretch of the Mississippi River braced Monday for months of restricted shipping as crews prepared to begin blasting large rock formations impeding navigation on the drought-plagued waterway. Contractors could begin drilling holes into troublesome river bedrock south of St. Louis and detonating explosives as early as Tuesday, the Army Corps of Engineers said. Demolition of the massive formations near Thebes, Ill., coincides with an unusual move by the agency to release water from a southern Illinois lake, adding a few inches of depth to a river that is getting lower by the day - largely because of the lingering effects of the worst drought in decades.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS - A group of U.S. senators will ask President Obama for an emergency declaration in an effort to keep barges moving on the drought-riddled Mississippi River, a spokesman for Sen. Claire McCaskill said Tuesday. Senators from Mississippi River states are seeking an emergency directive that would increase the flow of water from an upper Missouri River dam and expedite removal of rock formations in the middle Mississippi River that impede barge traffic during periods of low water.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Rains pushed dozens of Midwestern rivers and creeks over their banks yesterday, flooding low-lying areas and bringing out sandbag work-details that recalled scenes from the great flood of 1993. Storms that brought the drenching rains spawned about 50 tornadoes in Tennessee. One ripped through the Amish community of Ethridge, killing three people and injuring at least 20. Earlier in the day, a tornado swept across a shopping mall in Nashville, injuring at least 19 people. Tornadoes also tore through northern Alabama not far from the Tennessee line, leveling at least five houses and 15 mobile homes and injuring more than 40 people, authorities said.
NEWS
October 10, 2000 | By Kevin Murphy, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Vice President Gore took the political heat yesterday for President Clinton's veto of a $23.6 billion water and energy bill that he said could harm three endangered species on the Missouri River. Leading Republicans and Democrats in Missouri said that rewriting the bill to allow altering the flow of the Missouri to accommodate two endangered birds and one fish, as Clinton insists, would risk flooding in the state. Gore backed the President's veto, and Republicans promised yesterday to make it an issue in Missouri, a bellwether state that is considered a toss-up in Gore's contest with George W. Bush.
NEWS
June 10, 2011 | By Brian K. Sullivan, Bloomberg News
The rising Missouri River broke a 99-year-old record in western North Dakota as flooding that has shut oil wells and driven hundreds from their homes across seven states shows no sign of ending. The river reached 28.03 feet in Williston on Thursday, topping the mark set in 1912, and is projected to rise at least a foot higher by next week, according to the National Weather Service. "We're still not out of the woods," said Allen Schlag, a weather service hydrologist in Bismarck, North Dakota's capital.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Jim Suhr and Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - After months of drought, companies that ship grain and other goods down the Mississippi River are being haunted by a potential nightmare: If water levels fall too low, the nation's main inland waterway could become impassable to barges just as the harvest is ready for market. Any closure of the river would upend the transport system that has carried American grain since before steamboats and Mark Twain. So shipping companies are scrambling to find alternative ways to move tons of corn, wheat, and other crops to the Gulf Coast for shipment overseas.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 18, 2012 | By Jim Suhr and Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Barge operators along a key stretch of the Mississippi River braced Monday for months of restricted shipping as crews prepared to begin blasting large rock formations impeding navigation on the drought-plagued waterway. Contractors could begin drilling holes into troublesome river bedrock south of St. Louis and detonating explosives as early as Tuesday, the Army Corps of Engineers said. Demolition of the massive formations near Thebes, Ill., coincides with an unusual move by the agency to release water from a southern Illinois lake, adding a few inches of depth to a river that is getting lower by the day - largely because of the lingering effects of the worst drought in decades.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Jim Suhr and Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - After months of drought, companies that ship grain and other goods down the Mississippi River are being haunted by a potential nightmare: If water levels fall too low, the nation's main inland waterway could become impassable to barges just as the harvest is ready for market. Any closure of the river would upend the transport system that has carried American grain since before steamboats and Mark Twain. So shipping companies are scrambling to find alternative ways to move tons of corn, wheat, and other crops to the Gulf Coast for shipment overseas.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS - A group of U.S. senators will ask President Obama for an emergency declaration in an effort to keep barges moving on the drought-riddled Mississippi River, a spokesman for Sen. Claire McCaskill said Tuesday. Senators from Mississippi River states are seeking an emergency directive that would increase the flow of water from an upper Missouri River dam and expedite removal of rock formations in the middle Mississippi River that impede barge traffic during periods of low water.
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - The Army Corps of Engineers on Friday began reducing the flow from a Missouri River reservoir, a move expected to worsen low-water conditions on the Mississippi River and potentially bring barge traffic to a halt within weeks. The Missouri flows into the Mississippi around a bend north of St. Louis. One result of this year's drought, the worst in decades, has been a big drop in water levels on both rivers. The corps announced this month that it would reduce the outflow from the Gavins Point Dam near Yankton, S.D., to protect the upper Missouri basin.
NEWS
July 30, 2012
Cheney: 'Mistake' to choose Palin Former Vice President Dick Cheney said it was "a mistake" for Arizona Sen. John McCain to pick Sarah Palin as his vice-presidential running mate in 2008. Cheney led George W. Bush's vice-presidential search in 2000 before becoming Bush's running mate. Of the GOP selection process four years ago that led to Palin, he said, "That one I don't think was well-handled. " Palin hadn't "passed that test" of readiness to serve as president because her political experience was limited, Cheney said in an interview with ABC News.
NEWS
June 11, 2011 | By Matthew Brown and Stephen Dockery, Associated Press
BILLINGS, Mont. - Emergency workers ferried supplies to more than 300 people cut off Friday by flooding that has overwhelmed Montana towns and caused an estimated $8.6 million in damage. Heavy rain and the runoff from record mountain snowpack have caused rivers over much of the West to spill from their banks. Montana has been hit particularly hard over the last few weeks, with hundreds of homes inundated and scores of roadways swamped. River levels were retreating throughout the state Friday, but more rain this weekend was expected to cause floodwaters to linger across southeastern Montana.
NEWS
June 10, 2011 | By Brian K. Sullivan, Bloomberg News
The rising Missouri River broke a 99-year-old record in western North Dakota as flooding that has shut oil wells and driven hundreds from their homes across seven states shows no sign of ending. The river reached 28.03 feet in Williston on Thursday, topping the mark set in 1912, and is projected to rise at least a foot higher by next week, according to the National Weather Service. "We're still not out of the woods," said Allen Schlag, a weather service hydrologist in Bismarck, North Dakota's capital.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|