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Mitt Romney

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NEWS
December 3, 2012
By Matt Miller I have just the thing if President Obama was serious about asking Mitt Romney to "work together to move this country forward. " Romney was a world-class management consultant with a legendary appetite for "the data. " His private-equity success was due partly to his knack for identifying and purging inefficiencies from bloated, underperforming enterprises. It's time, therefore, to set him loose (analytically speaking) on the mother of all domestic challenges: America's radically inefficient health-care system.
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW HAVEN, CONN. - Fred Shapiro, associate librarian at Yale Law School, has released his seventh annual list of the most notable quotations of the year. The original "Yale Book of Quotations" was published in 2006, and Shapiro has updated it with an annual list of the top-10 quotes. Shapiro picks quotes that are famous, important or revealing of the spirit of the times, not necessarily ones that are the most eloquent or admirable. Here's the list: 1. "There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president no matter what . . . who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims . . . These are people who pay no income tax . . . and so my job is not to worry about those people.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | BY JAN C. TING
ONLY WHEN candidates speak in private do they reveal who they really are and what they really think. Mitt Romney did that in his remarks secretly recorded at a dinner for $50,000-and-up donors to his campaign in Boca Raton, Fla., in May. We should not forget what he said to those donors: "There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president no matter what . . . who are dependent on the government, who believe they are victims . . ....
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Steven Syre
I wonder if I'm retroactively retired and just don't know it yet. As Mitt Romney has shown, drawing a paycheck is no barrier to becoming retroactively retired at some point in the future. I'm on the young side to be any kind of retired, but so was Mitt when he made his backdated exit as chief executive of Bain Capital. Don't worry if you're confused. Every aspect of the furious political back-and-forth over Romney's departure from the Boston private-equity firm can make your head spin.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
I've always known I was lucky to have health insurance - unlike close to 1 in 6 Americans - but last week again made that clear. After Mitt Romney's recent comments on that topic, I'm thinking I may need treatment for vertigo. Consider the dizzying distance the GOP nominee traveled in three days. On 60 Minutes , he echoed George W. Bush's what-me-worry line that Americans can always go to the emergency room. "If someone has a heart attack, they don't sit in their apartment and die," Romney said.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Trudy Rubin
Foreign policy hasn't figured much in the presidential campaign, which is lucky for Mitt Romney. With scant foreign policy experience, Romney has had trouble projecting himself as a statesman. His foreign policy statements have veered from vague to disturbingly hawkish. So this week, he's off to Europe and Israel in hopes of burnishing his image as the future leader of the "free world. " Unfortunately, the world Romney seeks to lead no longer exists. Romney's foreign affairs statements have a Rip Van Winkle quality, as if he had just emerged from a sleep of two decades.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | Charles Krauthammer
At the outset of his recent foreign trip, Mitt Romney committed a gaffe. In answer to a question about the Olympics, he expressed skepticism about London's preparations. The response confounded and agitated Romney supporters because it was such an unforced error. The question invited a simple paean to Olympic spirit and British grit, not the critical analysis of a former Olympic organizer.   Soon that initial stumble was transmuted into a metaphor for everything that followed.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | John Baer
IF YOU'RE like me, you're on pins and needles waiting for Mitt Romney to release his tax returns so we can see (a) just how rich he really is and (b) what he's hiding from the American people.   Actually, I'm kidding. I don't give a rat's rump about Mitt's returns, other than to satisfy some voyeuristic curiosity. I mean, what? Rich people use tax laws to stay rich? That's news? The whole thing's a dopey distraction intended to keep folks focused on Mitt's money so that they don't focus on the lack of their own. Searchlight attention on a rich man's wealth means no spotlight on declines of middle-class income and assets.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
DERRY, N.H. - Ron McPhail mashed the horn and leaned out the window of his dump truck, yelling at the politician who was walking down the sidewalk Tuesday pursued by a pack of about 50 photographers and reporters. "Way to go, Mitt!" he said. "You've got my vote!" Mitt Romney, the former governor of Massachusetts, grinned, confident after emerging almost untouched from his first Republican presidential debate Monday night. He celebrated by tearing through two diners, a hardware store, and a feed store, accepting compliments on his performance and continuing to push his economic message that President Obama has failed to put the nation on a prosperous path.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Dick Polman
The president is a polarizing figure whose reelection is imperiled by his handling of the nation's No. 1 issue. However, he's blessed with an opponent who is easy to attack — a rich Massachusetts patrician with seemingly flexible convictions and a personality that impedes any visceral connection with voters.   But enough about George W. Bush and John Kerry. You see where I'm going with this. The 2012 contest has taken on the broad contours of 2004, when Bush eked out a narrow win by framing the race not as a referendum on his stewardship of the war in Iraq, but as a choice between the devil people knew and the devil they didn't.
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NEWS
July 2, 2015
NOW THAT JERSEY'S big boy has cannonballed into the presidential pool, the question is whether he sinks or swims. There's a good argument for sinking. He's in a (so far) 14-way Republican primary in which he polls in low single-digits. His approval rating in his own state is 30 percent, after topping 70 percent just two years back, so he isn't exactly ascending. He gave a dud 2012 convention speech more about himself than about nominee Mitt Romney. He warmly embraced President Obama after Hurricane Sandy prior to the 2012 election; some Republicans actually believe that helped Obama win. There's the George Washington Bridge thing.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Christie tried Friday to win over Republican activists gathered in Philadelphia to hear from several presidential hopefuls, casting himself as a terrorism fighter who wouldn't shy away from blunt talk in a run for the White House. In remarks spanning a half-hour, Christie emphasized his background as a federal prosecutor after the Sept. 11 attacks - experience he said would set him apart in the 2016 field. Of the declared or potential candidates, "you are looking at the only one who has actually used the Patriot Act," he said.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
For Jeb Bush, the initial plan was to stun the opposition into submission with boatloads of money, his network, his lineage. But nobody in the Republican presidential race was scared off by the former governor of Florida (except, perhaps, Mitt Romney). Instead, as he prepares to formally launch his candidacy Monday, Bush has slipped from heavy favorite to just one of several candidates clumped together near the top of a growing field. He does not lead in any of the early-voting states, most polls show.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
HUDSON, N.H. - Ejected brass shell casings, glittering as the light caught them, flew as former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee emptied a Sig Sauer P238 pistol at a human silhouette target at the Granite State Indoor Range & Gun Shop. Saturday was a great day to test the compact weapon for his wife, Janet, who wants something less bulky to carry, and to pay homage to the Second Amendment as a potential 2016 Republican presidential candidate in the first primary state. At the tail-end of mud season and after the sugar maple trees had been tapped for syrup, ambitions were rising in New Hampshire last week as Huckabee and 18 other Republican candidates or potential candidates for president trooped through the state and gathered for a two-day forum hosted by the state party in Nashua.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
CONCORD, N.H. - Leo Ouellette, a retired mailman from New Hampshire, is a fan of Gov. Christie's brash personality. But that does not necessarily mean he'll vote for Christie in the first-in-the-nation presidential primary. While Ouellette, 72, likes Christie - "I don't want a wimp," he said Monday, a cup of coffee in front of him, at the Windmill Restaurant in Concord - he also likes Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. "I'm wide open," Ouellette said. So, too, is the field of prospective Republican presidential candidates, as viewed by voters, elected officials, and strategists in the state.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writers
In his political branding, Gov. Christie is the blunt Jersey guy who'll tell you what he thinks even if you don't want to hear it. Yet a closer look at his rhetoric and policy actions shows Christie often straddles hot-button issues that divide conservative and moderate Republicans, a skill that will be tested in his expected campaign for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination. That tendency was highlighted last week when, at a pharmaceutical plant in Britain, Christie said parents should have "some measure of choice" about whether to vaccinate their children.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Experts and pundits tend to be terrible fortune tellers. Often wrong but rarely in doubt, they become invested in their own theories, rejecting new information that challenges their beliefs. The evidence is overwhelming, from Albert Einstein's prediction that "there is not the slightest indication that nuclear energy will ever be obtainable," to George Will's that Mitt Romney would win the 2012 presidential election by a landslide. Just as solidly proven, but far less known, is that in most cases, a group of average citizens venturing good guesses is more likely to make accurate forecasts than a typical authority on a subject, especially a smugly confident one. This counterintuitive truth has fascinated social scientists, psychologists, and statisticians for more than a century.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A defiant President Obama came to Philadelphia on Thursday to urge Democrats to keep aggressively promoting their beliefs, despite an Election Day drubbing. Embodying that combative outlook, Obama added a swipe at Republicans and Mitt Romney for, in his view, trying to imitate Democrats' concern for the average American. "Even though their policies haven't quite caught up yet, their rhetoric is starting to sound pretty Democratic," Obama said in a speech to House Democrats meeting at the Society Hill Sheraton.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
DES MOINES, Iowa - For months, the 2016 Republican presidential race has been dominated by the "invisible primary" scramble for the backing of the party's donor class. On Saturday, it goes grassroots. At least eight likely candidates will give their pitches to 1,500 conservative activists at the Iowa Freedom Summit in Des Moines, trying to seduce the people who pack a punch in the GOP caucuses, where the first votes of the party's nominating process are scheduled to be cast in a little over a year.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
DES MOINES, Iowa - New Jersey Gov. Christie told an audience of more than 1,000 Iowa conservative activists at a conference here Saturday that he shares the same political values, deriding the "conventional wisdom" that says he's too moderate for the state that will cast the first votes in the 2016 Republican presidential race in a little more than a year. "Let me ask you this, if I was too blunt, too direct, too loud, and too New Jersey for Iowa, then why do you people keep inviting me back?"
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