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Mitt Romney

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NEWS
December 3, 2012
By Matt Miller I have just the thing if President Obama was serious about asking Mitt Romney to "work together to move this country forward. " Romney was a world-class management consultant with a legendary appetite for "the data. " His private-equity success was due partly to his knack for identifying and purging inefficiencies from bloated, underperforming enterprises. It's time, therefore, to set him loose (analytically speaking) on the mother of all domestic challenges: America's radically inefficient health-care system.
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW HAVEN, CONN. - Fred Shapiro, associate librarian at Yale Law School, has released his seventh annual list of the most notable quotations of the year. The original "Yale Book of Quotations" was published in 2006, and Shapiro has updated it with an annual list of the top-10 quotes. Shapiro picks quotes that are famous, important or revealing of the spirit of the times, not necessarily ones that are the most eloquent or admirable. Here's the list: 1. "There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president no matter what . . . who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims . . . These are people who pay no income tax . . . and so my job is not to worry about those people.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | BY JAN C. TING
ONLY WHEN candidates speak in private do they reveal who they really are and what they really think. Mitt Romney did that in his remarks secretly recorded at a dinner for $50,000-and-up donors to his campaign in Boca Raton, Fla., in May. We should not forget what he said to those donors: "There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president no matter what . . . who are dependent on the government, who believe they are victims . . ....
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Steven Syre
I wonder if I'm retroactively retired and just don't know it yet. As Mitt Romney has shown, drawing a paycheck is no barrier to becoming retroactively retired at some point in the future. I'm on the young side to be any kind of retired, but so was Mitt when he made his backdated exit as chief executive of Bain Capital. Don't worry if you're confused. Every aspect of the furious political back-and-forth over Romney's departure from the Boston private-equity firm can make your head spin.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
I've always known I was lucky to have health insurance - unlike close to 1 in 6 Americans - but last week again made that clear. After Mitt Romney's recent comments on that topic, I'm thinking I may need treatment for vertigo. Consider the dizzying distance the GOP nominee traveled in three days. On 60 Minutes , he echoed George W. Bush's what-me-worry line that Americans can always go to the emergency room. "If someone has a heart attack, they don't sit in their apartment and die," Romney said.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | Charles Krauthammer
At the outset of his recent foreign trip, Mitt Romney committed a gaffe. In answer to a question about the Olympics, he expressed skepticism about London's preparations. The response confounded and agitated Romney supporters because it was such an unforced error. The question invited a simple paean to Olympic spirit and British grit, not the critical analysis of a former Olympic organizer.   Soon that initial stumble was transmuted into a metaphor for everything that followed.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | John Baer
IF YOU'RE like me, you're on pins and needles waiting for Mitt Romney to release his tax returns so we can see (a) just how rich he really is and (b) what he's hiding from the American people.   Actually, I'm kidding. I don't give a rat's rump about Mitt's returns, other than to satisfy some voyeuristic curiosity. I mean, what? Rich people use tax laws to stay rich? That's news? The whole thing's a dopey distraction intended to keep folks focused on Mitt's money so that they don't focus on the lack of their own. Searchlight attention on a rich man's wealth means no spotlight on declines of middle-class income and assets.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Trudy Rubin
Foreign policy hasn't figured much in the presidential campaign, which is lucky for Mitt Romney. With scant foreign policy experience, Romney has had trouble projecting himself as a statesman. His foreign policy statements have veered from vague to disturbingly hawkish. So this week, he's off to Europe and Israel in hopes of burnishing his image as the future leader of the "free world. " Unfortunately, the world Romney seeks to lead no longer exists. Romney's foreign affairs statements have a Rip Van Winkle quality, as if he had just emerged from a sleep of two decades.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
DERRY, N.H. - Ron McPhail mashed the horn and leaned out the window of his dump truck, yelling at the politician who was walking down the sidewalk Tuesday pursued by a pack of about 50 photographers and reporters. "Way to go, Mitt!" he said. "You've got my vote!" Mitt Romney, the former governor of Massachusetts, grinned, confident after emerging almost untouched from his first Republican presidential debate Monday night. He celebrated by tearing through two diners, a hardware store, and a feed store, accepting compliments on his performance and continuing to push his economic message that President Obama has failed to put the nation on a prosperous path.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Dick Polman
The president is a polarizing figure whose reelection is imperiled by his handling of the nation's No. 1 issue. However, he's blessed with an opponent who is easy to attack — a rich Massachusetts patrician with seemingly flexible convictions and a personality that impedes any visceral connection with voters.   But enough about George W. Bush and John Kerry. You see where I'm going with this. The 2012 contest has taken on the broad contours of 2004, when Bush eked out a narrow win by framing the race not as a referendum on his stewardship of the war in Iraq, but as a choice between the devil people knew and the devil they didn't.
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NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Dana Milbank
There must be 50 ways to leave your leader. Some slip out the back. "In this election, I do not support either Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton," said Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.). Some are making new plans. "I cannot support Donald Trump," said Sen. Ben Sasse (Neb.), calling for a third-party choice. A few are being coy. "Conventions have never been very appealing to me," said Sen. Roy Blunt (Mo.), explaining why he would miss this summer's. Others on this bus won't discuss much.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
Divergent results in Western states that voted Tuesday reflect how polarized the presidential race remains in both parties as the primary calendar starts to run out of pages. In a normal cycle, the question of Republican and Democratic nominees would be settled (or pretty much so) by now. On the GOP side, Donald Trump crushed Texas Sen. Ted Cruz by 22 percentage points in Arizona's primary, 47 percent to 25 percent. It was a winner-take-all contest, so the front-runner picked up 58 more delegates.
NEWS
March 9, 2016
ON SATURDAY, when Republican front-runner Donald Trump stretched his considerable lead by winning the Louisiana presidential primary, I realized that Mitt Romney had failed yet again. Romney, you may recall, is the presidential two-time loser whom the GOP tapped in an attempt to slow Trump's momentum. Republican leaders hoped that Romney delivering a speech in which he called Trump a liar, misogynist, con man and fraud would make the party faithful turn to a more traditional candidate.
NEWS
March 7, 2016
ISSUE | ROAD TO THE WHITE HOUSE Can Trump take a punch? Mitt Romney delivered an articulate, spot-on speech on the many negatives and personal liabilities of Donald Trump ("Republicans in turmoil," Friday). But did it deliver a knockout blow to Trump? No, it did not. Trump has amply displayed his biases, his misogyny, his prejudices, and his lack of policy specifics while campaigning. His supporters shrug them off, believing the man will shake things up, get things done, and "make America great again.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Mark Niquette, BLOOMBERG
Donald Trump won Louisiana's Republican primary and Kentucky's caucuses, but Texas Senator Ted Cruz claimed caucus wins in Maine and Kansas to bolster his argument that he is the main alternative to the businessman and reality TV star for the party's presidential nomination. In the Democratic race, front-runner Hillary Clinton won the primary in Louisiana, according to the Associated Press, while Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders had victories in Kansas and Nebraska caucuses, party officials said.
NEWS
March 3, 2016
REPUBLICANS now want to "Dump the Trump"? Come on. Too late, dudes. Shoulda listened when you had a chance. Last August, I wrote that if party leaders didn't want Trump, they needed to act, put together a deal to winnow the field with promises of future rewards and settle on a pair that could win in November. I even noted that a GOP ticket able to take Florida and (especially) Ohio can snag enough Electoral College votes to win the general election. Know the last Republican elected president without winning Ohio?
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Michael Smerconish
'Maybe this is the year we run the experiment?" I knew immediately what David Axelrod meant. And it wasn't the first time I'd heard the sentiment expressed while in Las Vegas to cover last week's Republican debate. We were sharing notes after the debate, awaiting an appearance on CNN. Axelrod spoke of the philosophical divide within the GOP as to whether the party is best served by nominating a pure conservative or a more pragmatic centrist. For many purists, history begins in 1980 with the nomination of Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | John Baer, Daily News Political Columnist
DWIGHT EVANS seeks a new political place. After 34 years in the Legislature during which he ran, then lost, the powerful House Appropriations Committee, after failed runs for lieutenant governor, governor and twice for mayor, he's now running for Congress. I wonder why. Why leave one mess in one Capitol for an arguably bigger mess in another? Especially since Washington runs on seniority, so if he wins, he starts on the bottom rung of the ladder. Maybe he's bored with Harrisburg.
NEWS
July 2, 2015
NOW THAT JERSEY'S big boy has cannonballed into the presidential pool, the question is whether he sinks or swims. There's a good argument for sinking. He's in a (so far) 14-way Republican primary in which he polls in low single-digits. His approval rating in his own state is 30 percent, after topping 70 percent just two years back, so he isn't exactly ascending. He gave a dud 2012 convention speech more about himself than about nominee Mitt Romney. He warmly embraced President Obama after Hurricane Sandy prior to the 2012 election; some Republicans actually believe that helped Obama win. There's the George Washington Bridge thing.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Christie tried Friday to win over Republican activists gathered in Philadelphia to hear from several presidential hopefuls, casting himself as a terrorism fighter who wouldn't shy away from blunt talk in a run for the White House. In remarks spanning a half-hour, Christie emphasized his background as a federal prosecutor after the Sept. 11 attacks - experience he said would set him apart in the 2016 field. Of the declared or potential candidates, "you are looking at the only one who has actually used the Patriot Act," he said.
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