CollectionsMitzvah
IN THE NEWS

Mitzvah

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
ABRAM KHLIBNIKOV, 75, from Tel Aviv, who speaks only Russian and Hebrew, arrived at Philadelphia International Airport on a Saturday last month. He found a Russian-speaking cabdriver and said that he'd come here to visit his cousin but that his cousin didn't want to see him, so now what? The cabdriver is from Northeast Philadelphia, so he figured that there's one place that could do a mitzvah - a good deed, a solid - for an abandoned Russian-speaking senior from Israel. It's the Raymond & Miriam Klein Jewish Community Center, on Jamison Avenue near Red Lion Road.
NEWS
March 31, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Yesterday was moving day for Pam, her two children - Gabrielle, 2, and Matthew, 11 months - and another family of four. After a week as guests of the Main Line Interfaith Hospitality Network at the First Presbyterian Church of Ardmore, the two formerly homeless families were heading off to spend another week at the Beth David Reform Congregation in Gladwyne. Normally, members of Ardmore Presbyterian Church would be on hand to help these families with the move. But yesterday, the helpers came from the Solomon Schechter and Perelman Jewish Day Schools, a gesture that allowed the Ardmore church members to spend Easter with their families.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Time at the North Philadelphia work site was short, but the message of tikkun olam - repair of the world - was strong. Nineteen visiting rabbis donned leather gloves along with their skull caps yesterday to haul sheetrock, brush and lumber at a Habitat for Humanity construction project. "As religious people our task is repairing the world," said Rabbi Aaron Selis of Rockville, Md., as he relayed junk out the door to a Dumpster. "It doesn't seem there's anything sacred about dust and sheetrock, but there is. " Selis was among 220 Rabbinical Assembly members who signed up for 15 sites including soup kitchens, homeless shelters and food banks pantries.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The soul-stirring sound of Alan Sweifach's klezmer clarinet captivated the audience as he sauntered down the aisle in a style reminiscent of a musician performing on New York's Lower East Side at the turn of the century. It didn't take long for the senior citizens at Martins Run Life Care Community in Marple Township to pick up the beat, clapping their hands and swaying to the rhythm of the Jewish-style jazz. Murray Levy, 88, and his wife, Shirley, fell into step behind Sweifach, forming a small dancing procession that wound through the auditorium.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Clarke Horowitz needed a bar mitzvah community service project, selling beads to help children in Africa seemed like a perfect way to give back. So far, Horowitz, 13, of Voorhees, has raised $1,200 to support children in Uganda. Although his bar mitzvah was a few weeks ago, he plans to keep selling the beads. "I enjoy it, so I would like to help," Horowitz said. "I know there's probably a kid just like me in Africa. " Horowitz and two other students who organized projects in South Jersey to help children in Uganda whose families have been ravaged by HIV/AIDS had a chance Tuesday to hear firsthand how their work has made a difference.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1992 | By Penny Jeannechild, FOR THE INQUIRER
Having been raised in a since-abandoned fundamentalist religion, one that viewed Christmas gift presentations as little more than a boon to "greedy merchants," I have long found the purchase of presents a guilt-inducing enterprise. That is, until a friend, similarly conflicted about the commercialization of Hanukah, confided her solution: Use your gift-giving dollars to support the arts. Even better, buy directly from an artist or crafts-maker. So while we cannot provide you with anything even close to an exhaustive list, forthwith are both general and specific suggestions for spending your dollars while doing a mitzvah (that's "good deed" in Hebrew)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Claire Dickson will start her summer vacation as usual at the end of this month, but when it's over she will not reopen her eponymous women's boutique the second week in August as she's done for 35 years. Dickson, one of the area's czarinas of special-occasion fashion, has decided to retire. And her daughter and business partner, Debbie, wants to spend more time with her teenage daughter. Rather than look for a replacement, Dickson is calling it quits. There is canasta to be played.
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jamie Nemeroff's hands were reaching for the chalk to make her mark on the brown-paper "Judah's wall" covered with Hanukah-theme graffiti. But Kathleen Soffer stopped her. This was an educational night, and Jamie had to answer a question first. "What does the word Hanukah mean?" Soffer asked. "Dedication," 11-year-old Jamie shot back, smiling at the easy question. She grabbed the light-blue chalk to write "Jamie was here" on the wall already inscribed with graffiti ranging from "Happy Hanukah" to "I love Isaiah.
NEWS
October 3, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Normally, paper-cuts bring to mind images of children at play with scissors. So to call the highly stylized original pieces currently on view at Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel's Temple Judea Museum paper-cuts is almost an injustice. Created by Stanley Tauber, an internist who lives in Melrose Park, the paper-cuts exhibition, titled "These Are The Names," is the culmination of more than 2 1/2 years of research and execution. Each of the 25 works represents the 22 letters from the Hebrew alphabet.
NEWS
December 18, 2010 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
A former employee alleged in a lawsuit filed in state court that the owners of the ill-fated Windowizards have long used company money to pay for personal expenses, including Eagles tickets and a bar mitzvah photographer. Richard Friedenberg, the son-in-law of one of Windowizards' owners, Barry Goodman, sued the company in April after he was laid off and denied severance pay in December 2009. Friedenberg's suit alleges that Windowizards "has relatively little if any assets from which it can meet its monthly financial obligations," yet the Goodmans "have accumulated things such as vacation homes and expensive motor vehicles," and have used the company's "assets to pay for expensive parties for their children and relatives.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
WHEN TATTLE was a kid, an over-the-top bar mitzvah party was one held at night - with steak. "Star Wars"-themed bar mitzvahs were a big deal. So were sports-themed. Sure, a boy was becoming a man, but he was still a boy. Now . . . Matt Murstein , the 13-year-old son of NYC rich guy Andrew Murstein , had his bar mitzvah party at Manhattan's swanky Pierre Hotel on Saturday night, and London's Daily Mail reports that the entertainment was . . . Nicki Minaj . Makes Tattle think that the snake in the Garden of Eden may have been an anaconda.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2015
THIS WEEKEND we went to a bat mitzvah. For many black families, this peek into Jewish tradition is culture shock. For the Joneses? It's old hat. We've been to so many bat mitzvahs that LaVeta is starting to hum along to the tunes. Little Solomon has started checking out the young men's yarmulkes. And Eve? Well, she's 13, so she's eyeing the bat mitzvah benefits. Having been to three bat mitzvahs so far, Eve has come to understand that girls her age who become "bat mitzvah" have the same rights as adults, are morally responsible for their actions and, best of all, get lots and lots of stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Claire Dickson will start her summer vacation as usual at the end of this month, but when it's over she will not reopen her eponymous women's boutique the second week in August as she's done for 35 years. Dickson, one of the area's czarinas of special-occasion fashion, has decided to retire. And her daughter and business partner, Debbie, wants to spend more time with her teenage daughter. Rather than look for a replacement, Dickson is calling it quits. There is canasta to be played.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Clarke Horowitz needed a bar mitzvah community service project, selling beads to help children in Africa seemed like a perfect way to give back. So far, Horowitz, 13, of Voorhees, has raised $1,200 to support children in Uganda. Although his bar mitzvah was a few weeks ago, he plans to keep selling the beads. "I enjoy it, so I would like to help," Horowitz said. "I know there's probably a kid just like me in Africa. " Horowitz and two other students who organized projects in South Jersey to help children in Uganda whose families have been ravaged by HIV/AIDS had a chance Tuesday to hear firsthand how their work has made a difference.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Dorothy Brown, For The Inquirer
When it comes to his memories as an 8-year-old in 1938, Kurt Herman can recall every detail: how his school friends in Vienna shunned him within days after Hitler annexed Austria; how his father hid at the top of a closet when Nazis searched their apartment; and how a Philadelphia couple eventually rescued him and 49 other children in what would be the largest single kindertransport to the United States. But even Herman, now 83, was surprised to learn some of the details of the Krauses' daring exploit that emerge from a new documentary being telecast Monday on HBO. 50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. and Mrs. Kraus is a tale of a tenacious Philadelphia lawyer, Gilbert Kraus, outmaneuvering a tightfisted U.S. State Department to find visas that did not exist; telegrams across the ocean from a husband anxious for his wife's help; a 34-year-old mother, Eleanor Kraus, leaving behind her two children, ages 9 and 13, to take the next ship to Europe; the emotional process of screening hundreds of children whose parents are desperate to send them to safety; and, just as the children are nearing freedom, a frightening encounter with Germany's and Italy's top military leaders.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
ABRAM KHLIBNIKOV, 75, from Tel Aviv, who speaks only Russian and Hebrew, arrived at Philadelphia International Airport on a Saturday last month. He found a Russian-speaking cabdriver and said that he'd come here to visit his cousin but that his cousin didn't want to see him, so now what? The cabdriver is from Northeast Philadelphia, so he figured that there's one place that could do a mitzvah - a good deed, a solid - for an abandoned Russian-speaking senior from Israel. It's the Raymond & Miriam Klein Jewish Community Center, on Jamison Avenue near Red Lion Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2012
In celebration of the bat mitzvah's 90th anniversary this year, we asked readers for their memories, and we got a heap. We heard from women ranging in age from 88 to 14, with bat mitzvahs dating from 1953 to 2011. Some were funny, others poignant, a few regretful, many joyful. To all our readers who shared, thank you (and mazel tov!) Back in 1970, girls were relegated to second-class status. We conducted the Friday night service, but there was no Saturday Torah reading for us. That was OK, but I was exceedingly jealous of my male counterparts who got lavish Saturday evening parties - with live bands!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It was a simple walk from her seat to the front of the Society for the Advancement of Judaism, a New York City synagogue. But when 12-year-old Judith Kaplan was summoned by her rabbi father to read from her Bible and recite some blessings, the act was revolutionary. On a March Saturday in 1922, two years after women in America got the right to vote, Rabbi Mordecai M. Kaplan broke tradition. He had, in essence, held a coming-of-age ceremony for his daughter, what boys at 13 had celebrated for centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2012
Whether you celebrated in 1922 or 2012, we want to hear your most vivid bat mitzvah memory. Did you take a tumble carrying the Torah? Get a kiss from the cutest boy in your class? Or break into a nervous sweat while on the bimah? Please e-mail your story in fewer than 150 words (include full name, town, and the year of your bat mitzvah) by Monday to crubin@phillynews.com , and we may include it in a story about the 90th anniversary of this rite of passage.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|