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Mixed Use Development

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NEWS
August 28, 1998 | By Kate Campbell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Supervisors this week heard details of a plan to develop about 80 acres bordered by Township Line Road, Old Forty Foot Road, and Skippack Pike. The land, now cornfields and woodlands, has been owned by Montgomery County Commissioner Mario Mele since 1990, said Township Manager Daniel Stonehouse. "Gambone Bros. Development Co. has the property under agreement of sale with Mele," said Richard Burke, land management developer for the firm, which is proposing a mix of commercial, office and residential uses for the site.
NEWS
February 25, 1988 | By Debbie Russell-Brown, Special to The Inquirer
Marple Township Planning Commission members have made sure that future homeowners who buy properties in housing developments will get what they pay for. The Commission voted 7-0 at Tuesday night's meeting to amend the subdivision requirement to include lighting standards in final site plans. The decision comes in the wake of an earlier controversy at the Paxton Chase development, where residents claimed that developer Donald Gaston had showed clients renderings which included lantern-style street lights but had actually installed regular lights.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Producing master plans to combat blight and revive rundown neighborhoods has practically become a cottage industry in Philadelphia. But comebacks, when they happen, rarely turn out the way planners script them. So it is with Point Breeze, which begins south of Washington Avenue on the west side of Broad Street, and extends well past Snyder Avenue. Once a working-class area of stalwart brick rowhouses, dramatically punctuated by cathedral-size churches that seem worthy of Rome, Point Breeze began coming apart at the seams with the '80s crack epidemic.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Buckingham Township's first supermarket, a building with a facade designed to look like seven small, village shops, has been proposed. Plans for the store to anchor a mixed-use shopping center with apartments were unveiled by Whitehall Equities Ltd. of Newtown at Wednesday's meeting of the township Board of Supervisors. The site of the proposed development is at the intersection of Routes 202 and 263 behind the Buckingham Professional Building. Buckingham Village, as the proposed 13.2-acre development is called, will include several small retail shops, small offices, perhaps a bank, a state liquor store and a restaurant in addition to the 40,000-square-foot supermarket.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2003 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four developers each put up a $50,000 fee and submitted proposals yesterday for the right to develop Penn's Landing, the 13-acre centerpiece of Philadelphia's riverfront. City Commerce Director James J. Cuorato said that before a decision was made in late October, all four would make presentations in an open forum and that the public would be given an opportunity to inspect the proposals. Each of the four developers envisions a mixed-use development for Penn's Landing - retail, office and, in some instances, residential - as well as public open space, Cuorato said.
NEWS
August 30, 2005 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Pennsylvania judge has ended a bid by Pennsbury Township to use municipal land for a mixed-use development along Route 1. Perry County Senior Judge Keith B. Quigley, who heard the case because a Chester County judge had joined a citizens' lawsuit against the development, ruled the project was not in the public interest. Fronefield Crawford Jr., an attorney for developers Tim Fuller and John Ciccarrone, could not be reached for comment. The land was donated to the township in 1968, and deed restrictions limited it to public use. Attorneys for Pennsbury and the developers, who had been working on the project for about a decade, belatedly realized that those restrictions had not been removed and last year petitioned the court to lift them.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THIRTY-FOUR years ago, Sarah McEneaney was a young art-school graduate who bought an old building on a gritty industrial stretch of Callowhill Street, because the price was right and she wanted a home with studio space for her artwork. Back then, "it would be busy during the day and, at night, it would be desolate and kind of scary," she said. But the neighborhood slowly grew busier as Chinatown inched northward and developers built condos, she added. City officials now plan to chart that change.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Camden City Council members took multiple steps intended to help boost development in the struggling city at a meeting Tuesday night. Council approved on first reading a resolution to add a 7 percent surcharge to commercial parking fees. Only facilities used solely as "residential premises" would be excluded. City Attorney Marc Riondino estimated that the fee would bring in about $500,000 per year - money dedicated to demolishing abandoned structures deemed unsafe. Riondino said the revenue stream would be cited when the city applies for a "long-term" bond - the amount of which has not yet been determined - to demolish at least 500 properties.
NEWS
January 22, 2003 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It sounds like a development pitch for the new millennium. On an empty steel mill site in the midst of Great Valley's sprawling, tinted-window office parks, O'Neill Properties, a King of Prussia developer, wants to build a walkable, mixed-use neighborhood from scratch. Drugstores, bookstores and cafes spilling out onto broad sidewalks; the offices and apartments on top of those stores looking out over parks - work, home and play all within walking distance. But this New Urbanist ideal is slated to take shape less than a mile and a half from charming Malvern Borough, which for a century has cultivated exactly the sort of walkable, homey feel that O'Neill Properties wants to create: A butcher shop, a bakery, a shop where executives can drop in to buy tailored suits.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Nancy M. Barnes, Special to The Inquirer
The Yardley Planning Commission unanimously recommended Monday that borough council amend its zoning ordinance to accommodate mixed-use development on a tract that is zoned for residential use. The commission voted after hearing strenuous objection from a new borough resident. The amendment would apply to a 17.5-acre site that developer Joseph T. Nickerson wants to develop for office, retail and residential uses. The amendment recommends that Nickerson's nonresidential building space be held to roughly 50,000 square feet, although Nickerson told the planners he needed to develop more than 70,000 square feet to make a profit.
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NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Camden City Council members took multiple steps intended to help boost development in the struggling city at a meeting Tuesday night. Council approved on first reading a resolution to add a 7 percent surcharge to commercial parking fees. Only facilities used solely as "residential premises" would be excluded. City Attorney Marc Riondino estimated that the fee would bring in about $500,000 per year - money dedicated to demolishing abandoned structures deemed unsafe. Riondino said the revenue stream would be cited when the city applies for a "long-term" bond - the amount of which has not yet been determined - to demolish at least 500 properties.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
ARDMORE Like a railroad car chugging laboriously toward its destination, the downtown Ardmore revitalization and train station project had a big obstacle thrown in its path this week. The obstacle is $12 million in funding the state said it will cut. Lower Merion Township officials received a letter Monday that says Gov. Corbett plans to reduce a pledged $15.5 million grant from the state's Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program to $3.5 million. The grant is for the project to revitalize the Ardmore station and build a residential and commercial development nearby.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THIRTY-FOUR years ago, Sarah McEneaney was a young art-school graduate who bought an old building on a gritty industrial stretch of Callowhill Street, because the price was right and she wanted a home with studio space for her artwork. Back then, "it would be busy during the day and, at night, it would be desolate and kind of scary," she said. But the neighborhood slowly grew busier as Chinatown inched northward and developers built condos, she added. City officials now plan to chart that change.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Producing master plans to combat blight and revive rundown neighborhoods has practically become a cottage industry in Philadelphia. But comebacks, when they happen, rarely turn out the way planners script them. So it is with Point Breeze, which begins south of Washington Avenue on the west side of Broad Street, and extends well past Snyder Avenue. Once a working-class area of stalwart brick rowhouses, dramatically punctuated by cathedral-size churches that seem worthy of Rome, Point Breeze began coming apart at the seams with the '80s crack epidemic.
NEWS
August 30, 2005 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Pennsylvania judge has ended a bid by Pennsbury Township to use municipal land for a mixed-use development along Route 1. Perry County Senior Judge Keith B. Quigley, who heard the case because a Chester County judge had joined a citizens' lawsuit against the development, ruled the project was not in the public interest. Fronefield Crawford Jr., an attorney for developers Tim Fuller and John Ciccarrone, could not be reached for comment. The land was donated to the township in 1968, and deed restrictions limited it to public use. Attorneys for Pennsbury and the developers, who had been working on the project for about a decade, belatedly realized that those restrictions had not been removed and last year petitioned the court to lift them.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
Route 70 debate empowers Medford residents Last week, Medford's Township Council passed ordinances that restrict the size of buildings that can be developed on Route 70. The vote ended months of debate and studies to bring this latest chapter to a close, so the township can develop a plan that makes sense for Medford and is consistent with the wishes of the vast majority of residents to maintain the town's rural character. While some opponents of the ordinance cautioned council members not to act hastily by passing what they claim is a less-than-perfect ordinance, council members opted to act now and gain greater control of the future of the Route 70 corridor.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2003 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four developers each put up a $50,000 fee and submitted proposals yesterday for the right to develop Penn's Landing, the 13-acre centerpiece of Philadelphia's riverfront. City Commerce Director James J. Cuorato said that before a decision was made in late October, all four would make presentations in an open forum and that the public would be given an opportunity to inspect the proposals. Each of the four developers envisions a mixed-use development for Penn's Landing - retail, office and, in some instances, residential - as well as public open space, Cuorato said.
NEWS
January 22, 2003 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It sounds like a development pitch for the new millennium. On an empty steel mill site in the midst of Great Valley's sprawling, tinted-window office parks, O'Neill Properties, a King of Prussia developer, wants to build a walkable, mixed-use neighborhood from scratch. Drugstores, bookstores and cafes spilling out onto broad sidewalks; the offices and apartments on top of those stores looking out over parks - work, home and play all within walking distance. But this New Urbanist ideal is slated to take shape less than a mile and a half from charming Malvern Borough, which for a century has cultivated exactly the sort of walkable, homey feel that O'Neill Properties wants to create: A butcher shop, a bakery, a shop where executives can drop in to buy tailored suits.
NEWS
August 28, 1998 | By Kate Campbell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Supervisors this week heard details of a plan to develop about 80 acres bordered by Township Line Road, Old Forty Foot Road, and Skippack Pike. The land, now cornfields and woodlands, has been owned by Montgomery County Commissioner Mario Mele since 1990, said Township Manager Daniel Stonehouse. "Gambone Bros. Development Co. has the property under agreement of sale with Mele," said Richard Burke, land management developer for the firm, which is proposing a mix of commercial, office and residential uses for the site.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lou Colagreco was blunt. If municipalities expect builders to offer more creative alternatives to suburban sprawl, they should make it easier - not harder - for them to do so, said the lawyer. "Developers don't create the sprawl," said Colagreco, one of Chester County's leading land-development and zoning attorneys. Speaking at a workshop Friday on building "livable communities," Colagreco called most municipal zoning ordinances "primitive" and laden with disincentives for anything other than the standard one-acre lot. When developers ask him whether it would pay for them to be creative in what they propose building, he said, five out of six times the answer will be no. And because for builders time is money, most will opt to go with whatever the zoning ordinance calls for rather than fight for something more innovative, he said.
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