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Moby

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Play, the latest effort from Moby, is a masterful tangle of musical contradictions. Some of its grooves are consummate electronica, icy and futuristic. Other, more pastoral pieces are defined by an organic warmth. A healthy chunk of the album is instrumental, in the tradition of this techno pioneer's film-score work. Yet some of its highlights find Moby singing in an urban deadpan, or enlisting the help of ghost voices from an earlier era - fire-and-brimstone gospel shouters for whom every phrase was an evangelistic opportunity, sampled from the Alan Lomax archive of Deep South field recordings.
NEWS
April 18, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
From its phosphorous backlighting to its glue-huffing swirls of orchestration, Moby's Friday night show at the Electric Factory - from the very start - was filled with good old rock bombast. Having witnessed the electronic-based Moby take on hardcore punk (the unfortunate Animal Rights) and minor-key piano-pop (his heavenly new Hotel) meant I wasn't unprepared. Rave king, techno-glam guy, gospel-tronic maven - despite his jovial, somnolent demeanor and quietly melodic, monotone voice, Moby has been all these things.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1999 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moby is the spiritual seeker of techno. He's the devout Christian superstar deejay from Darien, Conn., with classical-guitar and punk-rock roots whose ceaseless search for human warmth within the chilly textures of electronic music has led him to Play (V2), his brilliant, sanctified new dance album. But the distant descendant of Herman Melville, born Richard Melville Hall, who plays the Theatre of Living Arts on Wednesday (with Moa opening), doesn't see his music that way, he says over the phone from the Manhattan apartment/studio where he works on his music "pretty much all the time: It's all I do. " "This might seem simple and naive," says Moby, 33. "But my only goal is to make music I love.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1999 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With Oasis and the Foo Fighters sandwiched between Beck and Moby, the five-hour Y100 Feastival at the First Union Center on Friday put a pair of old-school guitar-bass-and-drums outfits in the middle of two of the decade's premier shape-shifting musical mixmasters. Whether dancing like Gumby with a cherub's head or falling to his knees as his falsetto soared skyward, Beck was the principal attraction. Confidently fronting a soul-revue carnival with a three-man horn section, two female singers and a DJ, the towheaded Los Angeleno was well-equipped to put over the surreal funk of his new sexed-up party album, Midnite Vultures (DGC)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1993 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
The fliers and posters that advertised the Halloween-night event put it succinctly - "Warning: Do not expect a rock concert. " Part of the See the Light Tour '93, the show Sunday at the Trocadero featured three of the better-known names on the techno circuit - Orbital, the Aphex Twin and Moby. Techno is an extremely high-energy form of electronic dance music usually reserved for raves and underground dance clubs. The genre is record- and DJ- based - its practitioners often make their recordings in bedroom studios - and does not lend itself easily to live performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1993 | By Dennis Romero, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moby may be one of pop's shyest sub-stars, a low-key guy known to check the tensile strength of his T-shirts before slipping one on. But he's the epitome of positiveness. On Wednesday night at the Trocadero, he encouraged the young, hyped crowd to "Drop a Beat" - the name of one of his songs - ostensibly in place of dropping acid or ecstasy. Given the level of adrenalin and tribal bass that flowed through the Troc, dropping beats might really be a surrogate for drugs. The former punk rocker - and descendant of Herman Melville - put on a one-man supershow by stepping away from his trio of sampling keyboards and dancing furiously.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
There are artists whom journalists interview once and they're done with each other. Little more can be said by either party regarding said aesthetic enterprise. Then there are guys such as the electronic music-maker Moby, who always have something new to say about something genuinely new that they've done. Like shifting gears from hard-core punk-rock to techno DJ to soft, sampling house-music maven. Or going from quietly making somnolent film scores to the brazen enterprise of 1999's Play, all of whose tunes got plucked for commercial usage.
NEWS
August 1, 2002 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
Five years after Lollapalooza limped off the summer concert landscape, techno-pop wizard Moby has taken that all-day festival's original multi-genre, multicultural mind-set and fashioned it into something palatable for today's discerning music consumers. At a sweltering Tweeter Center on Tuesday, his Area2 festival (the follow-up to last summer's Area:One tour) was the rare mixed-bag affair that offered something for everyone while alienating no one. Early birds were just as enthusiastic toward Ireland's Ash and its bratty guitar-rock as they were toward the New York-based musical theater troupe the Blue Man Group, with its tribal beats, twisted heaps of plastic tubing as percussion, and trademark blue skullcaps and body paint.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1993 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's midnight, and Moby - known in dance-club circles as the world's pre- eminent techno artist - is sitting in a small hotel room in the industrial city of Hanover, Germany, talking about his next single. "I can guarantee there's not a DJ in the world who will play it unless they want to drive people away from the dance floor," says the man who was born Richard Melville. A mighty strange career move for someone known as "the crown prince of techno. " Then again, Moby is more complicated than your typical dance music kingpin - even in the fast-changing genre known as techno.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charges against Youree Dell Harris - also known as Miss Cleo, the telemarketing TV psychic - were dropped yesterday as part of a $44 million settlement between the State of Florida and her promoter. Harris, who hawked her psychic powers to millions, was charged with deceptive trade practices in a suit filed by the Florida Attorney General's Office. She was dismissed as a defendant after the settlement was filed in court. William Cone, Harris' attorney, said she was rejoicing and maintains "an active practice as a shaman.
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NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
On the last warm day of October, Izzy Almeida and Derek Watson - the duo at the heart of the band called Hunters - head home to their apartment on 13th Street in Center City. They'll hang at a friend's house, eat at the local cantina ("where we eat way too much," Almeida says with a laugh), and talk about their coming self-titled debut album, full of smashing, fuzz-toned psych-pop. At this time last year, Almeida and Watson did these things in Manhattan's East Village or Brooklyn's Williamsburg section, where they shared an apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
At first, Moby-Dick would seem to be a hopeless operatic subject, with steep scenic demands and a story that hails from an era long gone and an industry now greatly diminished. But the forthcoming PBS Great Performances telecast of Moby-Dick from the San Francisco Opera (9 p.m. Friday on WHYY-TV12) turns out to be a vividly immediate Nantucket sleighride - the harrowing experience of being dragged by a harpooned whale - that succeeds on every level, thanks in part to a charismatic cast headed by Jay Hunter Morris and Stephen Costello (Philadelphia's own)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
There are artists whom journalists interview once and they're done with each other. Little more can be said by either party regarding said aesthetic enterprise. Then there are guys such as the electronic music-maker Moby, who always have something new to say about something genuinely new that they've done. Like shifting gears from hard-core punk-rock to techno DJ to soft, sampling house-music maven. Or going from quietly making somnolent film scores to the brazen enterprise of 1999's Play, all of whose tunes got plucked for commercial usage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Take the worst red-eye flight experience you've ever had - the one with massive turbulence, stale air, cranky fellow travelers. Then, add scores of venomous snakes slithering all over the cabin, and you have Snakes on a Plane. This hotly anticipated film delivers on the premise of its celebrated title. But it offers little more in terms of suspense, originality or enjoyment. Mostly, it lies there on the screen like a big lazy boa, leaving you to imagine the damage it could do if it ever roused itself.
NEWS
April 18, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
From its phosphorous backlighting to its glue-huffing swirls of orchestration, Moby's Friday night show at the Electric Factory - from the very start - was filled with good old rock bombast. Having witnessed the electronic-based Moby take on hardcore punk (the unfortunate Animal Rights) and minor-key piano-pop (his heavenly new Hotel) meant I wasn't unprepared. Rave king, techno-glam guy, gospel-tronic maven - despite his jovial, somnolent demeanor and quietly melodic, monotone voice, Moby has been all these things.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Thar she blows!" That pronoun in the famous cry when a whale is spotted is often the only female reference in stories dealing with the exclusively male occupation of 19th-century whaling. But not in Brat Productions' presentation of Moby Dick - Rehearsed. Here, the "she"-identified whale - Moby Dick herself? - has a lot of company. Indeed, everyone from the white-whale obsessed Capt. Ahab to the lowly cabin boy Pip in Orson Welles' adaptation of Herman Melville's classic novel is portrayed by an actress.
NEWS
May 27, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Although the founder and director of Brat Productions is a woman, the company has presented a number of pieces over the last several seasons written exclusively for male actors, among them well-received monologues by Irish playwright Conor McPherson. Madi Distefano says the masculine nature of her presentations has not gone unnoticed by those of her own sex. "I've gotten so much flak from my female friends for doing all these boy plays that I thought I'll do a whole season of women on stage," said Distefano, who founded Brat eight years ago when she was in her mid-20s.
NEWS
April 20, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Around midnight on Friday, after six solid hours lecturing on computer-aided music production, Lorin Ashton gathered up the records he had scattered around a Northern Liberties rowhouse, and set out for his DJ gig. "I'll be back around 2:30," he told the nine headphone-wearing people huddled over laptops on nine tables in the living room. "We can go as long as you want. " The night before, his students - participants in a free, five-day crash course sponsored by the Red Bull energy drink company - were still banging out beats at 5 a.m. "The thing about this stuff is, it can be addictive," Ashton, 26, said the next afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2003 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WE CAN SEE why Jennifer Lopez loved this guy. We're talking, of course, not about her new beau, Ben (the London Sun reports the wedding is back on) Affleck, but her true beau, Sean "P. Diddy" Combs. The hip-hop mogul has been in training for the past three weeks because he plans a run for charity in the Nov. 2 New York City Marathon. Combs, who hopes to raise $1 million for three children-focused groups with his run, is up to 15 miles now, a spokeswoman said. The beneficiaries of Combs' efforts are the Children's Hope Foundation, city public schools and Daddy's House Social Programs, which was founded by Combs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charges against Youree Dell Harris - also known as Miss Cleo, the telemarketing TV psychic - were dropped yesterday as part of a $44 million settlement between the State of Florida and her promoter. Harris, who hawked her psychic powers to millions, was charged with deceptive trade practices in a suit filed by the Florida Attorney General's Office. She was dismissed as a defendant after the settlement was filed in court. William Cone, Harris' attorney, said she was rejoicing and maintains "an active practice as a shaman.
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