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Mockingbird

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2010 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
It's one of those rare books that needs no introduction. Harper Lee didn't want it to have one, either. In writing the foreword to her Pulitzer Prize-winning classic, To Kill a Mockingbird , Lee noted: " Mockingbird still says what it has to say; it has managed to survive the years without preamble. " She's right about that. As the literary world celebrates Mockingbird's golden anniversary, it still says what it has to say. The story of Atticus Finch - a white lawyer who attempts to defend an innocent black man - is told through the eyes of Scout, his 6-year-old daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
To Kill a Mockingbird has proven to be an enduringly popular story. The Pulitzer Prize-winning, best-selling 1960 novel by Harper Lee has become a staple in school curricula, and both the book and the 1962 film seem to stick in people's minds years after each was first read or seen. But the story took a while to get to the professional stage. Although Christopher Sergel adapted the play to the theater in the 1970s, it was performed mostly by amateur groups until he revised it in the late 1980s.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Dr. Jason Karlawish, For The Inquirer
In February, the internationally acclaimed novelist Harper Lee surprised the world with news that in July, HarperCollins will publish her second novel, Go Set a Watchman . The publisher unveiled the cover two weeks ago. Written before her masterwork To Kill a Mockingbird, this one had been buried in a drawer for decades. Long ago, the author, certain that Mockingbird was her first and last work, decided that Watchman should not be published. Fifty years later, she changed her mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1989 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The reader's voice can make or break an audio book, so choosing the reader can be a formidable undertaking. Consider To Kill a Mockingbird, the 1961 Pulitzer Prize winner by Harper Lee. Set in Maycomb, Ala., it is the story of a few short years filled with a lot of growing up for a spunky little girl - Scout to her friends, Jean Louise to her prim aunt. Scout, her brother, Jem, and their friend Dill learn the meanings of persecution, prejudice and tolerance on several levels when Scout's father, lawyer Atticus Finch, defends a black man accused of raping a white woman.
NEWS
July 16, 2003 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester County Judge Juan R. Sanchez more or less threw the book at a defendant yesterday. Its title: To Kill a Mockingbird, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee. William Fowlkes, 46, of West Chester, was accused of spitting at a police officer, among other things. In issuing his sentence, Sanchez said he hoped Fowlkes would appreciate the vile nature of his action by viewing it through the eyes of Atticus Finch, the white lawyer in a racist town who defends a black man falsely accused of rape.
NEWS
June 30, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County Court judge closed the book yesterday on a novel sentencing - as well as a chapter in his own jurisprudence. Chester County Court Judge Juan R. Sanchez accepted a written report from William Fowlkes, 47, of West Chester, on To Kill a Mockingbird, the Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Harper Lee. Sanchez had ordered Fowlkes to read the novel last summer. Among Fowlkes' multiple infractions: spitting at West Chester Police Officer David Frantz. Monday had been the judge's last official day on the Chester County bench, but that proved to be a minor technicality.
NEWS
July 10, 2016
My Father & Atticus Finch By Joseph Madison Beck W.W. Norton. 218 pp. $25.95 Reviewed by Ginny Greene T o Kill a Mockingbird has inspired readers and critics for decades. But what inspired Harper Lee to write her novel? Joseph Madison Beck suggests he may have the answer. In this fast-moving memoir, Beck recounts how his father, a small-town lawyer, was thrown into the 1938 trial of a Northern black man accused of raping a local white woman in a southern Alabama town.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Zoë Miller and John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writers
In the biggest storm of anticipation in years, hearts are racing and breaths held throughout the literary world. As Monday turns over into Tuesday, publisher HarperCollins will release Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee. She is the author, now 89, of the 1961 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird , perhaps the most successful U.S. novel ever (40 million-plus sold). She has written no other novels since. She wrote Watchman first, but it postdates the events in Mockingbird (1950s as opposed to Mockingbird 's late 1930s)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Call it a Pecktacular! Gregory Peck, actor, humanitarian and hunk, will be celebrated for his various attributes this weekend as he is honored as as the second winner of the Philadelphia's Marian Anderson Award. The breadth of his acting range, from action hero to romantic ideal, will be spotlighted in tonight's double bill of The Guns of Navarone and Roman Holiday, outdoors on three big screens around Rittenhouse Square. The breadth of his character, ranging from activism for the arts to advocacy of gun control, will be cited when Mayor Rendell bestows the Marian Anderson Award on him Saturday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
On the Walnut Street Theatre's main stage, the dramatization of the celebrated Harper Lee novel To Kill a Mockingbird runs through the weekend. Meanwhile, in the third-floor studio, the theater is staging the premiere of The Gift, a play that purports to tell how Lee's book came to assume the structure that won it the Pulitzer Prize in 1961. Not that anyone who sees The Gift - unless he or she has this information beforehand or has enough literary savvy - will necessarily know what the play is trying to do. Nowhere does playwright Will Stutts refer to Harper Lee by name, and nowhere is there a strong indication that the novel will become To Kill a Mockingbird.
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NEWS
July 10, 2016
My Father & Atticus Finch By Joseph Madison Beck W.W. Norton. 218 pp. $25.95 Reviewed by Ginny Greene T o Kill a Mockingbird has inspired readers and critics for decades. But what inspired Harper Lee to write her novel? Joseph Madison Beck suggests he may have the answer. In this fast-moving memoir, Beck recounts how his father, a small-town lawyer, was thrown into the 1938 trial of a Northern black man accused of raping a local white woman in a southern Alabama town.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
Lobby Hero (Theatre Horizon). Kenneth Lonergan's depiction of four lives that collide one night in the lobby of an upscale apartment building. Race, gender, romance, moral dilemmas, comedy, seriousness. Opens Thursday, through March 13. Reviewed by Wendy Rosenfield (W.R.), Jim Rutter (J.R.), David Patrick Stearns (D.P.S.), and Toby Zinman (T.Z.). Assassins (Eagle). Nine people who tried to murder a president and leave their mark. This revival of the Sondheim musical has startling relevance to our current political plight.
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Black History Month. A staging of To Kill a Mockingbird . Natural fit. But the mostly musical-oriented Media Theatre Company staging it? Yes. Yes indeed. I've seen Jesse Cline direct many shows over the last 20 years, but the scope and overwhelming power of his production of Christopher Sergel's adaptation of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird eclipses almost all of them. It starts with the script. Lee's novel consists of three subjects: Scout (Lexi Gwynn) and her account of the town and people of Maycomb, Ala.; the way Scout and brother Jem (Brayden Orpello-McCoy)
NEWS
July 23, 2015
INDULGE ME. I need a few midsummer mini-rants on current noise in politics and culture. Take President Obama's ongoing evolution. Elected in 2008 on the promise of "change" (basically a fill-in-the-blank) and the prospect of a postracial America, he finally sounds like the first black president. In a recent eulogy in South Carolina, a speech in Philly and a visit to a prison, Obama brought national notice to racial issues in ways far more focused than his White House "beer summit" six years ago. If memory serves, that elbow-bending among arrested Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates, arresting officer James Crowley, Joe Biden and Obama served mostly to annoy Mothers Against Drunk Driving and American brewers whose products weren't imbibed.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For months, millions of literature lovers waited anxiously for the 55-years-in-the-making release of Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman , sequel to her Pulitzer Prize-winning classic, To Kill a Mockingbird , in which white lawyer Atticus Finch defends a black man accused of raping a white woman in a story told by Finch's young daughter, Scout. Upon release of the first chapter of Watchman on Friday and the full book on Tuesday, however, many fans were devastated to find that Finch turned out to be a racist.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Zoë Miller and John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writers
In the biggest storm of anticipation in years, hearts are racing and breaths held throughout the literary world. As Monday turns over into Tuesday, publisher HarperCollins will release Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee. She is the author, now 89, of the 1961 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird , perhaps the most successful U.S. novel ever (40 million-plus sold). She has written no other novels since. She wrote Watchman first, but it postdates the events in Mockingbird (1950s as opposed to Mockingbird 's late 1930s)
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Dr. Jason Karlawish, For The Inquirer
In February, the internationally acclaimed novelist Harper Lee surprised the world with news that in July, HarperCollins will publish her second novel, Go Set a Watchman . The publisher unveiled the cover two weeks ago. Written before her masterwork To Kill a Mockingbird, this one had been buried in a drawer for decades. Long ago, the author, certain that Mockingbird was her first and last work, decided that Watchman should not be published. Fifty years later, she changed her mind.
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