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Model City

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NEWS
May 13, 2000 | By Sandra L. Garz
After years of planning, The American Institute of Architects 2000 National Convention is over, and 20,000 new ambassadors for Philadelphia have been created. They will bring back to their cities and towns throughout the United States, Europe, the Far East and South America two realizations about Philadelphia: Not only is it a great town, but also it has much to offer other cities, as well as much to learn from them. Philadelphia was the perfect place for this convention. It has been 24 years since it was last here.
NEWS
February 11, 2011
PROTESTERS of re-entry programs need to stop following someone else's political agenda. The protesters remind me of the crowd that didn't want black people in Southwest Philadelphia in the '60s and '70s. What we have here is another form of discrimination, and these protesters should be sued. Discrimination by any other name is still discrimination. Where are ex-offenders to go if they can't go home? Not only must Philadelphia gain control of the crime issue, it must also gain control of the education and employment issue.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think it's tough building a city on Mars? Try building one on Europa, the fourth moon of Jupiter. That was the job faced by eighth grader Jonathan Taylor of Morrisville and his two teammates. If it hadn't been for the space warp and the cosmic ice crust, their city, Beston, might never have been built. But it was, and so was the Martian metropolis of Monoloch, which now moves to Washington, D.C., to enter the finals in the National Engineers Week Future City Competition during National Engineers Week, Feb. 21 to 27. Monoloch was one of 28 "future cities" conceived, designed and built in model form by Philadelphia-area middle school students and brought to the Franklin Institute over the weekend to be judged.
NEWS
January 18, 1997
Not long ago, residents of the nation's capital were agitating for "home rule. " Those who have not yet fled the District of Columbia now know the truth of the saying, "Be careful what you wish for; you might get it. " Compared to Washington's problems, Philadelphia looks like a model city. But our city's recent tenure on the brink was less precarious because Philadelphia has something Washington doesn't - a state. Philadelphia can claim, with cause, that Pennsylvania routinely shortchanges the city, leveling mandates it doesn't fund, passing down costs that Philadelphia must tax itself to absorb.
NEWS
March 25, 2004 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cautious optimism was the general tone of remarks made by city and economic-development officials to the Center City Proprietors Association yesterday. Speaking at a State of the City gathering cosponsored by the association and the Pennsylvania Economy League, city Managing Director Philip Goldsmith said that because of tight budget constraints, Philadelphia will experience "a couple of tough years" before dramatic improvements can be made. The city will eliminate the mounted police and slash budgets for public pools and recreation centers, Goldsmith said, and Center City residents will see changes in trash collections that will make them unhappy.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1993 | by Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
If it's any consolation, Philadelphia was once a model city. It was 1947, and it was only a miniature Philadelphia a few feet high. But the pile of platforms and tiny buildings that now lie dusty and broken in a city warehouse in Southwest Philadelphia was once the blueprint for the "City of the Future. " City planner Edmund Bacon hoped Philadelphia would become a world-class city on the level of Paris, Rome and New York. Like parts of Philadelphia, his model has come a long way, mostly downhill, from the time in 1947 when it sat for two months in Gimbel's department store, a 13-by-50-foot prediction of Philadelphia's future.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Squeezing 20 years into 26 minutes is no easy feat. Yet in "Promise for a Better City," the epochal shifts that transpired in Philadelphia between 1944 and 1964 - social, political, cultural, industrial - are detailed with clarity and insight. Sam Katz, the frustrated mayoral candidate turned fervent filmmaker, is the creative force behind this fascinating documentary, airing Thursday night at 7:30 on 6ABC. It's the third episode in Katz's Philadelphia: The Great Experiment - an ambitious 12-part series that he aims to complete over the next two years, and that aims to encapsulate the remarkable history of the City of Brotherly Love, from its colonial birth to the here and now. Mixing a trove of archival footage and photographs with talking-head interviews, "Promise for a Better City" begins with the thrum of machinery and men and women busy making the stuff of war. The city was transformed into "America's arsenal" during World War II, producing ships and tanks, chemicals and weaponry - a host of factories were repurposed for the war effort, staffed by Philadelphians who got to their jobs via an elaborate grid of trolleys run by the Philadelphia Transportation Co. When white PTC employees balked at working with African American trolley operators - a push organized by civil rights leader Carolyn Davenport Moore - the Roosevelt administration sent in troops to run the system.
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Michael Sabia sat next to a table covered with golf tees, a cracked TicTac container, metal screws and the innards of a telephone, the guts of a VCR and the remains of a computer keyboard. "This is the cremation table," he said, munching a pretzel. Picking up a small circuit board, the eighth grader from Our Lady Help of Christians tried to snip off a piece of blue plastic. When the scissors failed, he tried using his teeth. "I want it for a signal light on a generator if the lights go out or if the generator is bad," he explained.
NEWS
July 12, 1989
Joseph De Antonio, a World War II veteran, is sitting in JFK Plaza on a bright, sunny day, the fountain blowing sky high, the flags snapping along Ben Franklin Parkway. He comes in from Bordentown, N.J., to deal with the Veterans Administration at Broad and Cherry. And what does he see? He sees a lady drop a Mountain Dew bottle, watch it shatter and walk away. Can you believe it? He borrows a paper bag from a Cigna worker on the bench next to him. Then he goes and picks up the glass - big, jagged pieces - so the kids playing in the fountain don't get cut. Mr. De Antonio is beside himself about the scene in JFK Plaza.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
This was supposed to be India's model city of the future - a city inspired by the country's first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, and built from scratch under the direction of the world-renowned French architect Le Corbusier. It would replace the former Punjabi capital of Lahore - which had been lost to Pakistan during the bloody 1947 partition - and its symbol would be an open hand. It was a hand of much-needed friendship and also, in the words of Le Corbusier, "a hand to give and a hand to receive.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teams of middle-school students from throughout the area Saturday displayed model cities they had built, presenting their ideas for feeding urban dwellers of the future. The messy snow and rain combo may have triggered cancellations across the area, but the weather could not dampen the spirits of those students who flocked to the Future City Competition at Archbishop John Carroll High School in Radnor. Organizers said 32 of the 42 teams that had registered from public, private, and parochial schools made it to the 20th annual regional contest.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Squeezing 20 years into 26 minutes is no easy feat. Yet in "Promise for a Better City," the epochal shifts that transpired in Philadelphia between 1944 and 1964 - social, political, cultural, industrial - are detailed with clarity and insight. Sam Katz, the frustrated mayoral candidate turned fervent filmmaker, is the creative force behind this fascinating documentary, airing Thursday night at 7:30 on 6ABC. It's the third episode in Katz's Philadelphia: The Great Experiment - an ambitious 12-part series that he aims to complete over the next two years, and that aims to encapsulate the remarkable history of the City of Brotherly Love, from its colonial birth to the here and now. Mixing a trove of archival footage and photographs with talking-head interviews, "Promise for a Better City" begins with the thrum of machinery and men and women busy making the stuff of war. The city was transformed into "America's arsenal" during World War II, producing ships and tanks, chemicals and weaponry - a host of factories were repurposed for the war effort, staffed by Philadelphians who got to their jobs via an elaborate grid of trolleys run by the Philadelphia Transportation Co. When white PTC employees balked at working with African American trolley operators - a push organized by civil rights leader Carolyn Davenport Moore - the Roosevelt administration sent in troops to run the system.
NEWS
February 11, 2011
PROTESTERS of re-entry programs need to stop following someone else's political agenda. The protesters remind me of the crowd that didn't want black people in Southwest Philadelphia in the '60s and '70s. What we have here is another form of discrimination, and these protesters should be sued. Discrimination by any other name is still discrimination. Where are ex-offenders to go if they can't go home? Not only must Philadelphia gain control of the crime issue, it must also gain control of the education and employment issue.
NEWS
March 3, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Rocco Landesman, unfazed by the emptiness of an old industrial corridor in an old industrial city, undaunted by the difficulty of trying to fill that emptiness with workers and jobs and life, took a spin through the Crane Arts Building yesterday to talk about - what else? - art. The 62-year-old former Broadway producer (Big River, Angels in America, The Producers), now chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, made a point of saying his pilgrimage to Philadelphia was a key stop on what he has dubbed his "Art Works" tour of the nation, undertaken to explore and promote the arts as an economic catalyst.
REAL_ESTATE
August 14, 2005 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
After focusing on the suburban buyer for roughly five decades, a growing number of residential developers have headed back to the cities, eyes trained on a new and lucrative market. This shift is manifesting itself in several ways, such as the design and decoration of model homes. "It's tricky because there are so many variables in the city," said Amy Carlson of Francine Tessler & Associates of Little Silver, N.J., who has been designing models for Granor Price Homes of Horsham for several years.
NEWS
March 25, 2004 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cautious optimism was the general tone of remarks made by city and economic-development officials to the Center City Proprietors Association yesterday. Speaking at a State of the City gathering cosponsored by the association and the Pennsylvania Economy League, city Managing Director Philip Goldsmith said that because of tight budget constraints, Philadelphia will experience "a couple of tough years" before dramatic improvements can be made. The city will eliminate the mounted police and slash budgets for public pools and recreation centers, Goldsmith said, and Center City residents will see changes in trash collections that will make them unhappy.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | By Sandra L. Garz
After years of planning, The American Institute of Architects 2000 National Convention is over, and 20,000 new ambassadors for Philadelphia have been created. They will bring back to their cities and towns throughout the United States, Europe, the Far East and South America two realizations about Philadelphia: Not only is it a great town, but also it has much to offer other cities, as well as much to learn from them. Philadelphia was the perfect place for this convention. It has been 24 years since it was last here.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think it's tough building a city on Mars? Try building one on Europa, the fourth moon of Jupiter. That was the job faced by eighth grader Jonathan Taylor of Morrisville and his two teammates. If it hadn't been for the space warp and the cosmic ice crust, their city, Beston, might never have been built. But it was, and so was the Martian metropolis of Monoloch, which now moves to Washington, D.C., to enter the finals in the National Engineers Week Future City Competition during National Engineers Week, Feb. 21 to 27. Monoloch was one of 28 "future cities" conceived, designed and built in model form by Philadelphia-area middle school students and brought to the Franklin Institute over the weekend to be judged.
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Michael Sabia sat next to a table covered with golf tees, a cracked TicTac container, metal screws and the innards of a telephone, the guts of a VCR and the remains of a computer keyboard. "This is the cremation table," he said, munching a pretzel. Picking up a small circuit board, the eighth grader from Our Lady Help of Christians tried to snip off a piece of blue plastic. When the scissors failed, he tried using his teeth. "I want it for a signal light on a generator if the lights go out or if the generator is bad," he explained.
NEWS
January 18, 1997
Not long ago, residents of the nation's capital were agitating for "home rule. " Those who have not yet fled the District of Columbia now know the truth of the saying, "Be careful what you wish for; you might get it. " Compared to Washington's problems, Philadelphia looks like a model city. But our city's recent tenure on the brink was less precarious because Philadelphia has something Washington doesn't - a state. Philadelphia can claim, with cause, that Pennsylvania routinely shortchanges the city, leveling mandates it doesn't fund, passing down costs that Philadelphia must tax itself to absorb.
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