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Modern Art

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NEWS
October 21, 1988 | BOB LARAMIE/ DAILY NEWS
A pedestrian puts his head down as he runs a gauntlet of giant faces painted on the wall of a parking garage at 12th and Market streets yesterday.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
In three short scenes of Artist Descending a Staircase, Tom Stoppard demolishes the pretensions of modern art with fine dispatch. But the rest of his freaky little play is a letdown. It opened last night at the Helen Hayes Theater. Adapting his title from that of Marcel Duchamp's revolutionary nude, Stoppard focuses on the lives of three artists who have taken part in all the fads of the 20th century. They are seen in their old age, played by one set of actors, and in their romantic youth, portrayed by three others.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Degenerate Art, on Channel 12 at 9 tonight, opens with a view of the historic Altes Museum in Berlin that's as visually arresting as it is supremely ironic. Between the columns of the grand neoclassical facade, banners bearing the portraits of the most talented German artists of this century hang majestically. These are the artists Adolf Hitler tried to destroy by renouncing as "degenerate. " Last summer, the persecuted artists were back in Berlin in symbolic triumph, represented by some of the paintings and sculptures that Hitler banned more than 55 years ago. The exhibition of their work finally closed the book on Hitler's determined campaign to destroy modern art and to remake German culture in his own image.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you have a choice of seeing Museum, the current production of the Hedgerow Theater, or visiting the real thing, you'd probably be better off going to the museum. There is certainly more substance, artfulness and - if you are at all inclined toward the visual arts - entertainment to be found in the works hanging on museum walls than in Tina Howe's obvious, frequently strained comedy spoofing modern art and museumgoers. The play is set in the gallery of a museum on the last day of an exhibit titled "The Broken Silence.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Today's brain-teaser is this: Did Jonathan Waxman, the reigning filthy-rich darling of American modern art, drop in on his old shiksa girlfriend expressly to shake loose the nude portrait he had painted of her early in his career, which he needs to complete the retrospective exhibition of his work that is about to open in London? It looks suspiciously as though that is the reason he has descended upon the lady and her archaeologist husband at their drafty farmhouse in the English sticks.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Great museum collections often have their roots in great personal collections assembled by individuals of exceptional taste and discernment. For example, two major bequests in the early 1950s gave the Philadelphia Museum of Art a strong position in early modern art. One is the Louise and Walter Arensberg collection. The Arensbergs were not only pioneering collectors of artists such as Constantin Brancusi and Marcel Duchamp, they presided over a cultural salon in their Manhattan apartment that included writers and musicians as well as artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
In celebrating the completion of its new Lila Acheson Wallace wing for 20th-century art, which opens to the public Tuesday, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has assiduously pointed out that, from the day of its founding in 1870, the museum has been firmly committed to contemporary art. If that really were true, the Metropolitan wouldn't feel obliged to belabor the point. The inaugural installation drawn from the 20th-century collection, a curious melange of peaks and valleys, confirms what we have suspected all along - that the Metropolitan really hasn't been in close touch with modern art all these years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1993 | By Judith E. Stein, FOR THE INQUIRER
Precisely a century ago, when nationalistic pride prompted grand, international expositions, the king and queen of Italy marked their silver wedding anniversary by founding a biennial art exhibition in Venice. What would those monarchs make of the acres of art that constitute the 45th Venice Biennale, the world's best-known exhibition of contemporary art? As if in opposition to the founders' chauvinistic motives, Biennale curator Achille Bonito Oliva chose "cultural nomadism" as his theme, calling attention to "the 'nomadic' posture of the artist, and his disdain for territorial limitations.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Michael R. Taylor, the highly regarded curator of modern art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, has been named director of the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College. He will assume his new position in August, succeeding Brian Kennedy, who moved to the Toledo Museum of Art in September. Taylor, who was named the Art Museum's first modern art curator in 2004, said in a statement that he was "absolutely delighted" with his new position. The Hood's collection, he said, offered "exciting possibilities," particularly in the area of "student-driven exhibitions, which I believe hold the key to the museum's future success.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
For most of this century, painting has been dominated and defined by the accomplishments of Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, so much so that it's difficult to think of one without thinking of the other. Each has been enormously influential, even to this day, and each has been touted by devoted partisans as the greatest artist of modern times. As painters and as individuals, they were polar opposites. Picasso was a mercurial bohemian whose tempestuous art corresponds closely to his public persona.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
In 1960, pop art was nowhere. But POW! By 1970, it was everywhere. It was coast to coast in the States. It consumed Britain. It hit Brazil and Latin America, Japan, and even the Eastern Bloc dominated by the dread Soviet Union. On Wednesday, the Philadelphia Museum of Art opens "International Pop," a giant exhibition that explores how pop art zipped all over the world like a tsetse fly, spreading images and groans and money and pronouncements - glib and maybe even profound - wherever it showed up. Largely focused on the period from 1956 to 1972, "International Pop" represents a "a moment of informational connectivity unlike anything before," said Erica Battle, associate curator of contemporary art at the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2016 | Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
For fans of public art in Philadelphia, it still stings to think about that day in 1998 when word got out that an iconic wall sculpture by artist Ellsworth Kelly had been removed from the old Greyhound office building, quietly sold, and given to New York's Museum of Modern Art. It wasn't the first or last great work of public art to be lost to Philadelphia through some combination of intercity poaching, heedless development, and neglect. In fact, even as the Gallery mall closed for renovations Jan. 1, the fate of its public art remained unclear.
NEWS
December 30, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Staff Writer
The city's first piece of abstract public art - an iconic 1957 wall-mounted sculpture that once adorned Penn Center's Philadelphia Transportation Building at 17th and Market Streets - now nests in storage at New York's Museum of Modern Art. After several years of neglect, it was retrieved from Philadelphia in 1996 by the artist and his agent. But that is not Ellsworth Kelly's legacy in Philadelphia, where more than a dozen of his works are on prominent, permanent display, and one of his sculptures gleams on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The verb taking - as in, taking pictures - has, perhaps, never been more apt than when applied to street photographer Mark Cohen. He walks by a subject, snaps a photo without a glance through the viewfinder, and is gone. He does not ask permission. "When you ask permission to take a picture," he said, "it destroys the subtlety and the chance and the drama of the small theft that happens. " Cohen has stolen thousands of such moments - more than 50 years' worth of daily life in the small cities of northeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Michael Klein and Craig LaBan, Staff Writers
Restaurant pros are suddenly more passionately divided than ever on whether tipping should be a thing of the past. But most locals still plan to wait and see how influential restaurateur Danny Meyer fares with his game-changing new plans to raise prices and do away with gratuities at his 13 New York restaurants. Eli Kulp and Ellen Yin of the High Street Hospitality Group support the movement in theory. "The idea of eliminating tipping has been a very big conversation in our company lately as well," says Kulp.
TRAVEL
September 14, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
PARIS - From 1886 to 1889, Vincent van Gogh painted more than 30 head-and-shoulders images of himself, making him one of the art world's most prolific self-portraitists. Lacking money to pay live models, or the reputation to win commissions from patrons, the introspective Dutchman gazed into a mirror and splashed his canvasses with selfies of his soul. The "Van Gogh selfie" has a whole new meaning now at the Musee d'Orsay, the 115-year-old former railway station on the Seine that opened in 1986 as a museum for impressionist and post-impressionist art and that received 3.4 million visitors in 2014.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
The photographer George Tice has a long-running romance with his home state of New Jersey. It shines through in his large platinum prints of ordinary small-town fixtures: a movie theater, a White Tower hamburger joint, the well-stocked shelves of an old-fashioned grocery. His much-admired nocturnal images of a gas station ( Petit's Mobil Station, Cherry Hill, NJ , 1974) and a lonely telephone booth ( Telephone Booth, 3 A.M. Rahway, NJ , 1974) are of fluorescently lighted places we've all passed and barely noticed while driving at night, but Tice's still versions of them, shot with long exposures, transform them into glowing, mysterious beauties.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The shimmering silver broken tree, a monumental sculpture by the artist Roxy Paine that has been on view near the Philadelphia Museum of Art for nearly a year, has been acquired by the Association for Public Art and will remain permanently installed, association officials announced Monday afternoon. The acquisition was made possible by a grant from the Daniel W. Dietrich II Trust. Penny Balkin Bach, the association's executive director, said that "sometimes dreams come true" - the dream, in this case, being acquisition of what the internationally known Paine calls Symbiosis.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Horace Pippin died in West Chester in July 1946 at age 58, the New York Times obituary praised the painter as a "noted Negro artist, who taught himself to paint. " The Times then reported that "the simplicity of the primitives he produced" had led Chester County critic Christian Brinton to compare Pippin to "Pittsburgh road digger John Kane, famed housepainter artist. " Even in death, Pippin was presented not on his own terms, but in relation to a white artist in a comparison made by a white critic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you're trying to measure an artist's notability, one gauge is whether his or her work is owned by a major institution such as, say, the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Yet, of the 50 or so notable artists featured in the museum's exhibition "Represent: 200 Years of African American Art," only five or six have comprehensive entries on Wikipedia, a site that has become, for many, the de facto first stop for information on almost any topic....
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