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Modern Art

NEWS
April 15, 2012 | Ed Sozanski
Eighty-nine years ago this month, Albert Coombs Barnes and his ideas about art were rejected by the city of Philadelphia more rudely and forcefully than he deserved, or could have reasonably expected. That rejection contributed significantly to the collector's estrangement from the city's cultural and educational community, and also to the public perception of Barnes as a crotchety, egotistical, and vindictive misanthrope. The catalyst for this rupture, which persisted until Barnes died in a highway accident 28 years later, was an exhibition of a small portion of his art collection at, of all places, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.
NEWS
July 15, 2004 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has divided the leadership of its department of modern and contemporary art between two senior curators, an action that director Anne d'Harnoncourt said enhances the museum's ability to manage a growing collection of art made from 1900 to the present. Michael R. Taylor, acting head of the department since November, has been named Muriel and Philip Berman curator of modern art. He will oversee collections and exhibitions of works from the first half of the 20th century.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Museum, Tina Howe's satirical play set in an art musuem, will be presented this week in a Philadelphia art museum, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. It will be staged tonight and tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday at 2 p.m. in the academy's auditorium by the Hedgerow Theater in connection with the museum's current exhibition, "The Vital Gesture: Franz Kline in Retrospect. " Kline, who died in 1962, was in every sense a modern artist, and it is modern art that Howe spoofs in Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Museum of Modern Art is moving to Queens - but only temporarily. Will its public follow, five subway stops deep into Long Island? MoMA has embarked on a $650 million, four-year construction project that will enlarge and extensively renovate its building on West 53d Street in midtown Manhattan. To achieve this, the museum will close May 21. In late June or early July 2002, the provisional MoMA will open in a former Swingline stapler factory building in Long Island City.
NEWS
August 11, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Three artists have been chosen as finalists in a new competition established by Temple University's Tyler School of Art. They are Sanford Biggers of New York; Michael Rakowitz of Chicago and New York; and Ryan Trecartin of Philadelphia. The first Jack Wolgin International Competition in the Fine Arts will award the winner $150,000, a prize the organizers call "the world's largest given to a visual artist in a juried competition. " The three artists' work will be on view at Temple Gallery at Tyler Oct. 1-31, with the winner to be announced Oct. 22. Organizers also have revealed the names of the three jurors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
If Paul Cezanne is the father of modern art, then who are his progeny? "To Be Modern," an exhibition that will open Saturday at the Museum of American Art of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, helps to fill out the French master's genealogy on this side of the Atlantic. Cezanne's influence on American and European artists was widespread and long-lasting. Yet as this exhibition of early American modern art demonstrates, not all the artists who considered themselves "modern" followed his example closely.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Anne d'Harnoncourt, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art since 1982, confirmed yesterday that she has declined the job of director at New York's Museum of Modern Art. Although d'Harnoncourt, 51, made her decision during the summer, she acknowledged that it may not be widely known. "When you decide to stay somewhere, you don't send out a press release," she joked. D'Harnoncourt was one of several museum directors named as a possible successor to Richard E. Oldenburg, who announced his resignation as MoMA director in September 1993.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1997 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The board of trustees of the Philadelphia Museum of Art has a new chairman. After eight years in the post, Philip I. Berman of Allentown has stepped down for health reasons. He has been succeeded by Raymond G. Perelman, who has been vice chairman for five years. Berman, who will continue as a trustee, oversaw the successful conclusion of the recent Landmark Renewal Fund campaign that raised more than $64 million for the museum. He and his wife, Muriel, have been active for many years as collectors and museum benefactors.
NEWS
February 20, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
A wonderfully eclectic ensemble of art greets the visitor to the exhibit "Works by Women Artists: Selections from the Scott Memorial Study Collection, Part 2" at Bryn Mawr College. The collection represents an encyclopedia rather than an intense exploration of any particular theme or period of the 20th century. Most of these fairly recent works on paper by 63 artists are intimately scaled rather than monumental efforts. And the current policy of organizing shows from these gradually increasing holdings (begun in 1991 and now numbering 208 works by 178 artists)
NEWS
July 8, 1998
Don't force the taxpayers to pay for modern art Susan V. Berresford's comments about art (Commentary, June 29) underscore what is wrong with modern art and artists. She defends graffiti and junk modern art and chastises a skeptical audience for not agreeing with her. In doing so, she demonstrates the very elitism and reverence for dubious talent that make art so marginal to American life. Its irrelevance virtually guarantees that the coffers will continue to be empty. America is far from artless.
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