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FOOD
May 9, 2013
Makes 16 to 20 servings 4 cups flour 2 cups sugar 1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature,    cut into cubes 2 cups boiling water 1 tablespoon baking soda 1 cup molasses 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and grease the bottom of a 9-by-13-inch baking pan. 2. Combine flour, sugar, and butter into crumbs in a large bowl, using two knives, a pastry blender, or your fingers. Reserve one cup of crumbs for the topping. 3. In a separate large bowl, add the baking soda and molasses to the boiling water.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"The truth is," says Bessie Delany at the beginning of Having Our Say, "is that I never thought I'd see the day when people would be interested in what two old Negro women had to say. " Since the play debuted at Princeton's McCarter Theatre early in 1995, theater audiences have been more than interested in the conversation of Bessie and her sister Sarah (called Sadie). They've found the play engrossing enough to give it a 9 1/2-month run on Broadway, and now a national tour in an excellent production at the Annenberg Center, through Sunday.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | Joyce Gemperlein
¼ cup tomato paste ¼ cup sorghum molasses, unsulfured molasses, or maple syrup (see note) 3 tablespoons dry mustard 2 tablespoons cider vinegar 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar Kosher salt 1 cup dark beer 2 quarts cooked white beans, drained, cooking liquid reserved 6 thick slices smoked bacon   1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine the tomato paste, sorghum, dry mustard, vinegar, brown sugar, and 1 teaspoon salt.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | By Dawn Capewell, Special to The Inquirer
When it takes three hours to put toilet tissue and molasses on your face, some people just would not take the trouble to apply it. Not so with an actor determined to recapture every nuance of a character, said Robert Billbrough, an actor based in Burlington City. Actors do not hesitate not only to create wrinkles with molasses, but also to do painstaking research on every role, he said. Billbrough, 32, who grew up in Willingboro, is an Equity actor who performs regularly on television - including Saturday Night Dead on KYW-TV Channel 3 in Philadelphia - and in regional theater.
FOOD
December 7, 1988 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
With too much to do and too little time, the fond feelings of Christmases past tend to fade as quickly as last night's frost. Turn on the oven, and memories of kinder and gentler Christmases begin to rekindle - in the crackle of a roasting bird, the cloying ecstasy of too many sweets and the spicy steam of freshly baked gingerbread. For it is gingerbreads, from the hardtack crack of a gingerbread man to a silken spice cake warm from the oven that herald the coming of Christmas for countless celebrants year after year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The good news about the 1776 that opened early this month at the Gershwin Theatre, transferring from the Roundabout Theatre Company's home in the Criterion Center after a sold-out limited run, is that it's a shipshape production in almost every respect. The bad news is that it's still 1776. Many people, I know, don't share that assessment. They're altogether enamored of the 1969 musical by Peter Stone (book) and Sherman Edwards (music and lyrics), which imagines how the Declaration of Independence came into being during three humid months in Philadelphia in the year of the title.
NEWS
August 1, 1988 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a few things it'd be good for you to know about Maine in the summertime. First, the weekend tourist traffic around Kennebunkport and Acadia National Park rivals anything on the Schuylkill Expressway at rush hour. Second, people along the most lonely, remote back roads like to pile odds and ends into their driveways and hold yard sales. And lastly, come July and early August, bean-hole beans are sure to be cooking in the ground. What are bean-hole beans, you ask?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2008
Christmas always inspires the best in beer-makers, who turn out their most opulently spiced brews for the season. So why not a jolly Hanukkah beer, too? The crafty folks at He'Brew (a.k.a. "the Chosen Beer"), have answered that prayer with Jewbelation 12, a big-boy dark ale that really lit my menorah. It's among the best efforts I've tasted yet from New York-based Shmaltz Brewing Company, which has a reputation for serious beers with schticky names like Messiah Bold, Rejewvenator, and a lager series inspired by Coney Island's freak shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2010
Troegenator, the doppelbock from Troeg's Brewing Co. in Harrisburg, has a sweet maltiness that pairs well with the molasses and contrasts with the heat in the sauce. MIDATLANTIC PIG 'WINGS' Pig Wing Marinade (see below) 1 pound boneless pork butt 1/2 cup buttermilk 1/2 cup Roast Pork Cure (see below) Vegetable oil for frying 1/4 cup flour 1/4 cup cornstarch Salt and pepper MidAtlantic Pig Wing Sauce (see below) Start with 1 pound Boston pork butt (shoulder)
NEWS
June 14, 2007 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
You may already be a barbecue "sauce-iopath" or a competition-class smoke-pit purist. Or maybe you're just a backyard kettle-grill amateur. But everyone, and I mean everyone, can use a splash of tangy love from time to time. Because there is no char-marked sin a good sauce can't cure, no triumphant beer-can chicken that can't fly higher with a brush of the perfect fiery glaze. But how to choose? There are literally hundreds (maybe thousands) of sauces out there, and the variations seem endless, from international flourishes (Hawaiian, Mexican, Asian)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 9, 2013
Makes 16 to 20 servings 4 cups flour 2 cups sugar 1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature,    cut into cubes 2 cups boiling water 1 tablespoon baking soda 1 cup molasses 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and grease the bottom of a 9-by-13-inch baking pan. 2. Combine flour, sugar, and butter into crumbs in a large bowl, using two knives, a pastry blender, or your fingers. Reserve one cup of crumbs for the topping. 3. In a separate large bowl, add the baking soda and molasses to the boiling water.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | Joyce Gemperlein
¼ cup tomato paste ¼ cup sorghum molasses, unsulfured molasses, or maple syrup (see note) 3 tablespoons dry mustard 2 tablespoons cider vinegar 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar Kosher salt 1 cup dark beer 2 quarts cooked white beans, drained, cooking liquid reserved 6 thick slices smoked bacon   1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine the tomato paste, sorghum, dry mustard, vinegar, brown sugar, and 1 teaspoon salt.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2010
Troegenator, the doppelbock from Troeg's Brewing Co. in Harrisburg, has a sweet maltiness that pairs well with the molasses and contrasts with the heat in the sauce. MIDATLANTIC PIG 'WINGS' Pig Wing Marinade (see below) 1 pound boneless pork butt 1/2 cup buttermilk 1/2 cup Roast Pork Cure (see below) Vegetable oil for frying 1/4 cup flour 1/4 cup cornstarch Salt and pepper MidAtlantic Pig Wing Sauce (see below) Start with 1 pound Boston pork butt (shoulder)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2008
Christmas always inspires the best in beer-makers, who turn out their most opulently spiced brews for the season. So why not a jolly Hanukkah beer, too? The crafty folks at He'Brew (a.k.a. "the Chosen Beer"), have answered that prayer with Jewbelation 12, a big-boy dark ale that really lit my menorah. It's among the best efforts I've tasted yet from New York-based Shmaltz Brewing Company, which has a reputation for serious beers with schticky names like Messiah Bold, Rejewvenator, and a lager series inspired by Coney Island's freak shows.
NEWS
June 14, 2007 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
You may already be a barbecue "sauce-iopath" or a competition-class smoke-pit purist. Or maybe you're just a backyard kettle-grill amateur. But everyone, and I mean everyone, can use a splash of tangy love from time to time. Because there is no char-marked sin a good sauce can't cure, no triumphant beer-can chicken that can't fly higher with a brush of the perfect fiery glaze. But how to choose? There are literally hundreds (maybe thousands) of sauces out there, and the variations seem endless, from international flourishes (Hawaiian, Mexican, Asian)
FOOD
August 18, 1999 | By Shirley Corriher, FOR THE INQUIRER
I know that sugar is a bad word. Goodness knows, we've been told often enough. The current anti-sugar book, Sugar Busters (Ballantine; 1998) by H. Leighton Steward et al., is still hot. And, admittedly, I do my share of sugar watching. I even drink my iced tea straight. But, alas, life is never simple - no black and white, always shades of gray. Sugar, like calcium, has long been known to help preserve the texture of fruits and vegetables during cooking. When fruits or vegetables are heated, the pectic substances - the "glue" holding cells together - change to water-soluble pectin that dissolves.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The good news about the 1776 that opened early this month at the Gershwin Theatre, transferring from the Roundabout Theatre Company's home in the Criterion Center after a sold-out limited run, is that it's a shipshape production in almost every respect. The bad news is that it's still 1776. Many people, I know, don't share that assessment. They're altogether enamored of the 1969 musical by Peter Stone (book) and Sherman Edwards (music and lyrics), which imagines how the Declaration of Independence came into being during three humid months in Philadelphia in the year of the title.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"The truth is," says Bessie Delany at the beginning of Having Our Say, "is that I never thought I'd see the day when people would be interested in what two old Negro women had to say. " Since the play debuted at Princeton's McCarter Theatre early in 1995, theater audiences have been more than interested in the conversation of Bessie and her sister Sarah (called Sadie). They've found the play engrossing enough to give it a 9 1/2-month run on Broadway, and now a national tour in an excellent production at the Annenberg Center, through Sunday.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For several weeks, motorists have endured slow traffic through this township, detoured around a mile-long stretch of Ridge Pike by a sinkhole. Yesterday, many of them awoke to discover that another road had bitten the dust. A second east-west throughway in Whitemarsh has been shut down by a crippling crevice of sunken macadam: Flourtown Road, a popular alternative route for motorists who thought they had cleverly escaped the delays around the closed Ridge Pike. It's enough to drive frustrated motorists - and traffic safety officers such as Eileen Whalon - batty.
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Municipalities in Delaware County are complaining that costly long lines at trash-transfer stations have become the norm since the county's hauler quit almost three weeks ago. In some cases, the delays have meant overtime and slower trash pickups because trash-filled trucks have had to wait in line for hours or have been turned away from transfer stations in Marple and Chester Townships. County officials have assured municipalities that the problems are temporary, the result of a recent change in haulers that occurred before the new contractor was able to acquire the special compacting trucks needed for the job. County Councilman Thomas H. Killion said that, with at least a year left on his contract, Joseph F. Cappelli defaulted on his agreement to haul trash from the two sites to the Westinghouse incinerator in Chester and the county's landfill in Berks County.
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