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Molly Ivins

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the apple never falls far from the tree, as common wisdom has it, no one told the razor-sharp commentator Molly Ivins. Or maybe someone did and - typical of Ivins - she laughed at the idea. Then disproved it. Ivins was born into a well-to-do, conservative Republican family in Texas. She fell from the tree, brushed herself off, then walked away a head-held-high liberal, precisely as the spot-on Kathleen Turner plays her in the world premiere of Red Hot Patriot. Ivins delighted in challenging people who thought like her parents.
NEWS
October 24, 2004 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having coffee with Molly Ivins is like sitting down with your jocose aunt, the one who tells slightly off-color stories at family funerals. I met her 22 years ago, when I was a cub reporter at the Dallas Times Herald, where she was a rare female star. Devoting more than 30 years of her professional life to writing political commentary that drips with dry wit and leans heavily toward old-school Texas populism, Ivins, 60, has become an eminent voice in American journalism and a sweetheart of the liberal left.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Molly Ivins, the late and legendary Texas political columnist, is being brought back to life by Kathleen Turner in Philadelphia Theatre Company's Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins - a world premiere that also manages to be a revival. Ivins' Texas accent and brassy humor added style to her indictments of government shenanigans and malfeasance. No fan of "43," she wrote in Bushwhacked (2003) about how ordinary citizens' lives can be affected - negatively - by government decisions.
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | By Molly Ivins
No shortage of material for a holiday weekend column celebrating the nuttiness, diversity and rampageous, outsized je ne sais quoi (as we always say in Lubbock) that makes these shores such a treat to live on. You must admit we have more interesting heavyweight championship boxing matches than the average place. And a charitable organization has demonstrated our extreme flexibility by naming Rupert Murdoch "Humanitarian of the Year," an award presented by Henry Kissinger. We live in a great nation.
NEWS
January 17, 1994
READERS ASSESS JOAN KRAJEWSKI'S, MOLLY IVINS'S VIEWS ON GUN CONTROL Upon reading Joan Krajewski's Guest Opinion on who the Brady bill protects, I get the feeling that the Brady bill should not have come up since it doesn't address all the concerns, but the bottom line is that it is something that we haven't tried to do nationally. Last week I was in a bank that got held up, and they were not pointing knives. Certainly, we need stronger laws, and I agree with you about better prisons or more money for failed programs, but until we get leaders who won't worry about getting re-elected and are willing to put the bad guys away, why have bills at all?
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | BY RUTH MALONE
Two premises before we begin, kiddies: One, that it would be substantially impossible to create a Supreme Court more mediocre than the one we have now, with Thurgood Marshall gone. And two, that we need a national level Molly Ivins, writing from Kiddie City, D.C., itself, to do true justice to the black-and-blue comedy played out recently on our TV sets. Nevertheless, like a boxer fighting out of her class, game but outweighed, one cannot refuse this challenge. Thomas was adequately described by one reporter as an "In-Your-Face" nomination by our trigger-happy president.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | By Tom Fiedler, Inquirer Convention Bureau
Leave it to Ann Richards, the treasurer of the state of Texas, to cut to the core of the matter when asked what she thinks about being asked to speak to countless millions on prime-time television on the first day of the Democratic National Convention. "I think about the time I threw up at my first dance," she said. When, at a little bit before 9:30 tonight, Americans tune in for the keynote address - traditionally the image-setting act of a national convention - they will meet a drawling "good ol' gal" from Waco, Texas, with the wit of a stand-up comic and, depending on the side she wants to show, the bite of an adder or a heart as big as her native state.
NEWS
November 2, 1995 | SIGNE WILKINSON
Dan Perkins, as Tom Tomorrow, is the 34-year-old creator of "This Modern World," a popular editorial cartoon that appears weekly in the City Paper and 89 other publications around the country. Collections of his work include "Greetings from This Modern World" and "Tune In Tomorrow," both from St. Martin's Press. In town recently for a panel discussion at the Free Library, Perkins stopped by the Daily News and talked with Daily News editorial cartoonist Signe Wilkinson. Q:What qualifies you?
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Ben Yagoda
Seventy-five years ago this week, the 55-year-old columnist and entertainer Will Rogers, along with the aviator Wiley Post, died in a plane crash near Point Barrow, Alaska. This was before the advent of the 24/7 news cycle, so it took a while for word to get around. It wasn't until the next day that Senate Majority Leader Joe Robinson, a longtime friend of Rogers', stood up on the Senate floor to announce: "Will Rogers, probably the most widely known private citizen and certainly the best beloved, met his death some hours ago in a lonely, faraway place.
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NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Ben Yagoda
Seventy-five years ago this week, the 55-year-old columnist and entertainer Will Rogers, along with the aviator Wiley Post, died in a plane crash near Point Barrow, Alaska. This was before the advent of the 24/7 news cycle, so it took a while for word to get around. It wasn't until the next day that Senate Majority Leader Joe Robinson, a longtime friend of Rogers', stood up on the Senate floor to announce: "Will Rogers, probably the most widely known private citizen and certainly the best beloved, met his death some hours ago in a lonely, faraway place.
NEWS
June 13, 2010
By Meghan Daum Alfred A. Knopf. 256 pp. $24 Reviewed by Susan Balée Meghan Daum has been making me laugh for nearly 20 years. She writes essays for the New Yorker and a column for the Los Angeles Times. A few years ago, she plunked herself down in Nebraska and wrote The Quality of Life Report , a funny novel about the American heartland. Any topic that takes her fancy, from Internet dating to writers' conferences to playing the oboe, becomes grist for her snarky mill. She's got the wit of Molly Ivins and the brains of Mary McCarthy, but unlike these dead icons, she can't be pinned down to any region, religion, or political affiliation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the apple never falls far from the tree, as common wisdom has it, no one told the razor-sharp commentator Molly Ivins. Or maybe someone did and - typical of Ivins - she laughed at the idea. Then disproved it. Ivins was born into a well-to-do, conservative Republican family in Texas. She fell from the tree, brushed herself off, then walked away a head-held-high liberal, precisely as the spot-on Kathleen Turner plays her in the world premiere of Red Hot Patriot. Ivins delighted in challenging people who thought like her parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Molly Ivins, the late and legendary Texas political columnist, is being brought back to life by Kathleen Turner in Philadelphia Theatre Company's Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins - a world premiere that also manages to be a revival. Ivins' Texas accent and brassy humor added style to her indictments of government shenanigans and malfeasance. No fan of "43," she wrote in Bushwhacked (2003) about how ordinary citizens' lives can be affected - negatively - by government decisions.
NEWS
December 29, 2007 | By Polly Anderson, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Former first lady Lady Bird Johnson outlived her husband, Lyndon, by more than 35 years, expanding on her White House efforts to carve her own legacy as an environmentalist. When she died July 11 at age 94, she left behind countless miles of scenic highways across the United States, dotted not by billboards and junkyards but by wildflowers. She is one of the political figures, artists, businessmen and heroes to whom we said goodbye in 2007. Two charismatic but flawed leaders, Russia's Boris Yeltsin and Pakistan's Benazir Bhutto, aimed to bring democracy to their homelands.
NEWS
February 4, 2007 | By Bob Davis
Molly Ivins, who died Wednesday after a long battle with cancer, wrote the 1991 book Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She? She could say it. And she did. I discovered the depths of what she could say when we were both new hires at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. It was the early 1990s, with the Anita Hill controversy fresh on the American conscience, and the newspaper's corporate owners were requiring new employees to undergo sexual harassment awareness training. The poor soul picked to lead these sessions had to deal in these sensitive, hot-button topics in the blandest way possible.
NEWS
November 7, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
Guant?namo Bay Nov. 7 My dear wife, They are letting me write one letter to let you know that I am alive. I am at the new Liberal Media Re-Education Camp here at Gitmo; I am not allowed to see a lawyer or make phone calls. They are afraid that if I talk to a lawyer, I'll pass a coded message to my old colleagues on the Editorial Board, telling them to oppose the flat tax or support Arlen for Judiciary Committee chairman or something. This letter will be censored, so I have to be careful.
NEWS
October 24, 2004 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having coffee with Molly Ivins is like sitting down with your jocose aunt, the one who tells slightly off-color stories at family funerals. I met her 22 years ago, when I was a cub reporter at the Dallas Times Herald, where she was a rare female star. Devoting more than 30 years of her professional life to writing political commentary that drips with dry wit and leans heavily toward old-school Texas populism, Ivins, 60, has become an eminent voice in American journalism and a sweetheart of the liberal left.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | By BARBARA KINGSOLVER
IN THE FOUR months since September, we've moved from our first waves of dread and rage over a massacre to the slower task of facing what has been lost. The new year is a good time to assess how we're doing. In a thousand ways we've honored our dead with honorable behavior toward each other, but in some quarters we're still captive to fear. We hurt. In our frustration with the impossibility of making our world safe, some are drawn to easier targets, willing to have straw enemies set up to be shot down, to relieve the popular anger.
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | By Molly Ivins
No shortage of material for a holiday weekend column celebrating the nuttiness, diversity and rampageous, outsized je ne sais quoi (as we always say in Lubbock) that makes these shores such a treat to live on. You must admit we have more interesting heavyweight championship boxing matches than the average place. And a charitable organization has demonstrated our extreme flexibility by naming Rupert Murdoch "Humanitarian of the Year," an award presented by Henry Kissinger. We live in a great nation.
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