FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1997 | By James S. Russell, FOR THE INQUIRER
What is likely to be the most important American architectural commission of the next several years went to Yoshio Taniguchi, 60, an architect little known outside his native Japan. The Museum of Modern Art in New York on Monday unveiled Taniguchi's preliminary design for an expansion, which may ultimately more than double the museum's 180,000 square feet of exhibition space. Taniguchi was chosen after a controversial 18-month process. The museum first did a worldwide search, then invited 10 architects to submit conceptual design ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1993 | By George Hough, FOR THE INQUIRER
I suppose it could be argued that we brought it all on ourselves by waiting until the penultimate week of the Matisse retrospective to plan a trip to New York. But then we would have missed finding out how the museum hot-ticket world works. The show has closed now, but the lessons we learned will be useful in dealing with the next New York blockbuster. When you call the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) from Philadelphia, you get one of those elaborate multiple-choice recordings that eventually tells you what you need to do to get tickets for the exhibit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Here in the rolling country of the northern Poconos, Marlon Brando is trapped in a metal canister, in a room as stark and gray as a prison cell. So, too, is his Godfather costar Al Pacino, locked in a vault maintained at a bone-chilling 36 degrees. And just a stone's throw away, down a gravel road that curves around a broad, sloping meadow, Lillian Gish and Charlie Chaplin sit, neatly stacked, in a building where the air conditioning thrums at a constant 45 Fahrenheit. Of course, these fabled movie thespians and other legends from the 100-year history of the medium aren't really here.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2004 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Over the last four years, the Museum of Modern Art, the preeminent repository of modern art in the world, spent a staggering amount of money - $425 million in construction and renovation costs alone - to create a new home for its collections in midtown Manhattan. The new MoMA is 60 percent larger than the facility it replaces, although the area devoted to exhibitions grew by only 47 percent. The total bill for the project, including property acquisition, establishing an interim museum in Queens, and building an endowment, is an even more mind-boggling $858 million.
NEWS
July 14, 2008 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Wearing a flawlessly pressed white dress shirt, navy slacks and hard hat, Philadelphia architect James Timberlake hoisted himself onto an aluminum beam of his firm's latest construction project, a four-story, see-through, energy-efficient plastic house. The pioneering creation, improbably wedged among the skyscrapers of 53d Street, is about to change everything for his firm, KieranTimberlake Associates. Dubbed Cellophane House, the structure is one of five full-size houses commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art for its summer show, "Home Delivery" - a major survey of the state of house-building - and erected on an asphalt lot two doors west of the museum.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
In New York and Washington, the new art season is already under way. Major photography shows, for Henri Cartier-Bresson and Edward Weston, opened last week in New York, while at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, a major exhibition for the French impressionist Berthe Morisot and a smaller one for the American painter William Merritt Chase have been up for more than a week. The Cartier-Bresson show, at the Museum of Modern Art, examines the Frenchman's work during the early 1930s, when he first used a 35mm Leica camera.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Germans wore gray, Ingrid Bergman wore blue. . . Oops, that's the colorized version of Casablanca, the classic tinted by Ted Turner in 1988. Restored to sparkling black-and-white, the 1942 film romance celebrated its 50th birthday Tuesday night at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). There, Atlanta's Ted Turner and Morocco's King Hassan II (a royal emissary, anyway) hosted a gala screening of the movie that will be rereleased in selected cities tomorrow. A Philadelphia run is planned, though an opening date has not yet been scheduled.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2011
  THE GIZMO: Two "show pieces" for your high-res TV screen and home theater sound system earn our roaring approval. BRING IT ALL HOME: If you were a Bill Gates, you might buy the great Corbis Collection of art and photo images (as Mr. Microsoft actually did), in part to display the works on your big-screen sets. If you were a Warren Buffett, you could commission great musicians to perform for parties in your living room. But for the rest of us, fine-art images and a state-of-the-art concert performance that grandly show off a high-resolution TV screen and surround-sound system are now just a Blu-ray disc away, thanks to Screen Dreams' collection "MoMA: 50 Masterworks From the Collection" and the coolest 3-D video concert ever captured, Peter Gabriel's "New Blood Live in London," just out from Eagle Rock.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
This decade had no sooner begun than art historians, who are no less enamored of instant replay than the rest of us, set briskly to work trying to figure out what the last decade was all about. So eager were they to make sense of the turbulent '80s that they didn't even wait for the '90s to begin before setting to their task. How do we know? Because just one month into 1990, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington gave us this decade's first review of its predecessor, an exhibition called "Culture and Commentary.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Whatever one thinks of Frank Stella's art, the man must be given credit for working assiduously at it for 28 years, for continuing to take chances when he could have taken it easy. When he was still in his mid-20s, Stella achieved what many young artists today hunger for, a widely publicized signature style that sells like hotcakes. Stella has done that many times over, and yet he keeps moving forward because he's obsessed with an idea - locating the limits of pictoriality. Just a year out of Princeton University, Stella devised a novel form of abstract painting that catapulted him to celebrityhood.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
The paper came off the display windows of Analog Watch Co. over the weekend as one of East Passyunk's newest businesses made its official debut with an open house Saturday. But as far as "a huge dream" coming true for owner Lorenzo Buffa, that happened a few days earlier, when two styles of Analog's Carpenter wristwatch debuted in a space revered by designers: the Museum of Modern Art's Design Store and its website. "As a product designer, in terms of notoriety I can't think of anything better," an exuberant Buffa said during an interview at his 700-square-foot shop at Moore Street and East Passyunk Avenue, formerly a yoga studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2011
  THE GIZMO: Two "show pieces" for your high-res TV screen and home theater sound system earn our roaring approval. BRING IT ALL HOME: If you were a Bill Gates, you might buy the great Corbis Collection of art and photo images (as Mr. Microsoft actually did), in part to display the works on your big-screen sets. If you were a Warren Buffett, you could commission great musicians to perform for parties in your living room. But for the rest of us, fine-art images and a state-of-the-art concert performance that grandly show off a high-resolution TV screen and surround-sound system are now just a Blu-ray disc away, thanks to Screen Dreams' collection "MoMA: 50 Masterworks From the Collection" and the coolest 3-D video concert ever captured, Peter Gabriel's "New Blood Live in London," just out from Eagle Rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Harry Eastlack, whose tissue turned to bone, lives again. So, too, do Chang and Eng Bunker, the Siamese twins who fathered 21 children between them. And Chenallier, a 19th-century French basket-maker whose tumor was so large it resembled a giant pillow - all have been returned to life, in a manner of speaking, in "Through the Weeping Glass: On the Consolations of Life Everlasting (Limbos & Afterbreezes in the Mütter Museum). " This cinematic celebration of the "cruel beauty" of the vast collection of objects housed at the Mütter had its world premiere Thursday evening, as several hundred guests were treated to Stephen and Timothy Quay's unique take on the museum's trove of medical oddities and marvelous, albeit morbid, artifacts.
NEWS
July 14, 2008 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Wearing a flawlessly pressed white dress shirt, navy slacks and hard hat, Philadelphia architect James Timberlake hoisted himself onto an aluminum beam of his firm's latest construction project, a four-story, see-through, energy-efficient plastic house. The pioneering creation, improbably wedged among the skyscrapers of 53d Street, is about to change everything for his firm, KieranTimberlake Associates. Dubbed Cellophane House, the structure is one of five full-size houses commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art for its summer show, "Home Delivery" - a major survey of the state of house-building - and erected on an asphalt lot two doors west of the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2004 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Over the last four years, the Museum of Modern Art, the preeminent repository of modern art in the world, spent a staggering amount of money - $425 million in construction and renovation costs alone - to create a new home for its collections in midtown Manhattan. The new MoMA is 60 percent larger than the facility it replaces, although the area devoted to exhibitions grew by only 47 percent. The total bill for the project, including property acquisition, establishing an interim museum in Queens, and building an endowment, is an even more mind-boggling $858 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1997 | By James S. Russell, FOR THE INQUIRER
What is likely to be the most important American architectural commission of the next several years went to Yoshio Taniguchi, 60, an architect little known outside his native Japan. The Museum of Modern Art in New York on Monday unveiled Taniguchi's preliminary design for an expansion, which may ultimately more than double the museum's 180,000 square feet of exhibition space. Taniguchi was chosen after a controversial 18-month process. The museum first did a worldwide search, then invited 10 architects to submit conceptual design ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Here in the rolling country of the northern Poconos, Marlon Brando is trapped in a metal canister, in a room as stark and gray as a prison cell. So, too, is his Godfather costar Al Pacino, locked in a vault maintained at a bone-chilling 36 degrees. And just a stone's throw away, down a gravel road that curves around a broad, sloping meadow, Lillian Gish and Charlie Chaplin sit, neatly stacked, in a building where the air conditioning thrums at a constant 45 Fahrenheit. Of course, these fabled movie thespians and other legends from the 100-year history of the medium aren't really here.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
There's a marvelous moment in the Joan Miro retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art when we can watch the great Spanish painter cross a boundary from the concrete world of the senses into the more ethereal world of the imagination, a world he would inhabit until his death in 1983. It happens in the span of three paintings that Miro completed between the summer of 1921 and the winter of 1924. The transition is thrilling to behold not only because Miro makes it look effortless but because he pulls us along.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Last year Henri Matisse, the subject of a massive exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, was the talk of New York. This year that distinction falls to Joan Miro, another giant of 20th-century art, who died 10 years ago. To celebrate Miro's 100th birthday, MoMA has organized an appropriately scaled show of more than 300 works that will examine his career from 1915 through late 1970. The Miro retrospective, which will run from Oct. 17 through Jan. 11, looks like the most significant out-of-town museum attraction this season.
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