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BUSINESS
February 20, 2013 | By Mark Sherman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Vernon Hugh Bowman seems comfortable with the old way of doing things, right down to the rotary-dial telephone he said he was using in a conference call with reporters. But the 75-year-old Indiana farmer figured out a way to benefit from a high-technology product, soybeans that are resistant to weed-killers, without always paying the high price that such genetically engineered seeds typically bring. In so doing, he ignited a legal fight with seed-giant Monsanto Co. that has now come before the Supreme Court, with argument taking place Tuesday.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Monsanto Co. said yesterday it would lay off up to 2,500 workers as it spins off its chemicals business to focus on its faster-growing agriculture, food and health-care units. The move is the most dramatic of a series of steps by Monsanto to transform itself from a traditional chemical company into a leader in the emerging agricultural-biotechnology industry. Monsanto will set aside $400 million to $600 million to cover the cost of the spin-off, to be charged against 1996 earnings.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Monsanto Co. yesterday said it would eliminate 3,200 jobs, about 10 percent of its workforce, to help cope with stiff worldwide competition in its pharmaceutical and chemical businesses. The company also said it would sell some of its businesses and curb research. The changes will result in a one-time after-tax charge of $425 million in the fourth quarter. Monsanto, with 32,000 employees now, reported almost $9 billion in sales in 1991. But its profits have plunged 56 percent over the last two years.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
A Philadelphia jury stunned the Monsanto Co. yesterday by ruling that the company should pay $90 million in damages to the state of Pennsylvania for selling defective and toxic PCBs that left PennDot's Harrisburg headquarters contaminated after a 1994 fire. The verdict followed 10 days of deliberations and a 15-month civil trial that was one of the longest in state history. The company said it would appeal. "Thank God it's over," one juror yelled as she left the City Hall courtroom.
NEWS
August 21, 2000 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
For 15 months it has unfolded, practically unnoticed, in a Philadelphia courtroom, one of the longest civil trials in Pennsylvania history. The context is unprecedented, and the stakes are enormous. At issue is nothing less than whether state taxpayers should pay for a gleaming new $200 million PennDot headquarters in Harrisburg - or whether a giant chemical company should pick up the tab instead. The saga began six years ago, when a five-alarm fire damaged the former state Department of Transportation building, a 30-year-old, 12-story structure next to the state Capitol.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
A Philadelphia jury stunned the Monsanto Co. yesterday by ruling that the company should pay $90 million in damages to the state of Pennsylvania for selling defective and toxic PCBs that left PennDot's Harrisburg headquarters contaminated after a 1994 fire. The verdict followed 10 days of deliberations and a 15-month civil trial that was one of the longest in state history. The company said it would appeal. "Thank God it's over," one juror yelled as she left the City Hall courtroom.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trouble came knocking early at farmer Scott Good's door in August. "They showed up at my door 6 o'clock in the morning. They flipped a badge out," said Good, a Burlington County soybean grower. "It wasn't polite what they were saying. They acted like FBI. " The two men were private investigators. They had been watching him. Monsanto, the St. Louis agribusiness giant, had sent them. They wanted to know about his beans. Under advice of his lawyer, Good finally told them: The beans had been grown from seed saved from the previous harvest, a practice that goes back to the beginning of farming.
NEWS
August 21, 2000 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
For 15 months it has unfolded, practically unnoticed, in a Philadelphia courtroom, one of the longest civil trials in Pennsylvania history. The context is unprecedented, and the stakes are enormous. At issue is nothing less than whether state taxpayers should pay for a gleaming new $200 million PennDot headquarters in Harrisburg - or whether a giant chemical company should pick up the tab instead. The saga began six years ago, when a five-alarm fire damaged the former state Department of Transportation building, a 30-year-old, 12-story structure next to the state Capitol.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Neighbors of the Paoli Railroad Yard who contended they were exposed to toxic chemicals lost a nine-year battle in federal court yesterday. A 12-member jury in Philadelphia rejected the neighbors' claims that they had received significant exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, and were entitled to lifelong medical tests. The jury also denied the neighbors compensation for alleged property damage stemming from PCB contamination. The verdict in U.S. District Court came nearly a decade after the Environmental Protection Agency discovered that the train repair yard was badly contaminated with PCBs, a suspected cancer-causing agent used in electric train transformers.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Jack Kaskey and Susan Decker, Bloomberg News
DuPont Co. lied to a federal court and investors about its right to use Monsanto Co. seed technology as a central part of its defense in a patent lawsuit, a judge has ruled. DuPont "knowingly perpetrated a fraud against the court," according to a Nov. 16 order by U.S. District Judge Richard Webber unsealing sanctions he levied last December that limited the company's defenses in the lawsuit brought by Monsanto. E-mails from DuPont executives and lawyers show they knew the company didn't have an agreement allowing it to combine Monsanto's Roundup Ready soybeans with a second trait, while telling the court and public for years that it had such a right, Webber ruled.
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BUSINESS
July 9, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Customs conversation is often the same for Kemal Malik, who carries a United Kingdom passport as a top executive for the German-based global giant Bayer AG. The agent will ask Malik what company he works for. Malik: "Bayer. " Agent: "Oh, the aspirin company. " "That's what we are known for, and that's great," Malik said in Philadelphia recently at the American Association for Cancer Research meeting. "But we want to be known for other stuff and we have that opportunity.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
People saying they are concerned about the health and environmental implications of food made with genetically modified organisms gathered Saturday afternoon in Center City for a rally and march calling for mandatory labeling of "GMO foods. " Philadelphia's "March Against Monsanto" was one of hundreds taking place Saturday in cities around the world, a coordinated effort to bring attention to genetically engineered foods and to criticize Monsanto, the multinational agricultural company that has been a leader in producing genetically modified seed to farmers.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By David Pitt, Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa - The World Food Prize Foundation on Wednesday took the bold step of awarding this year's prize to three pioneers of plant biotechnology whose work brought the world genetically modified crops. The private nonprofit foundation, which is in part funded by biotechnology companies, refused to shy away from the controversy surrounding genetically modified crops that organic-food advocates say are harmful to people and the environment. "If we were to be deterred by a controversy, that would diminish our prize," said the foundation's president, Kenneth Quinn, a retired diplomat.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2013
In the Region Leaner Supervalu to shed workers   Supervalu Inc. , which last week sold Acme Markets and four other national supermarket chains to a Cerberus Capital Management-led investor group, said Tuesday that it plans to eliminate 1,100 jobs as it trims costs amid falling sales. The company still operates about two dozen Save-a-Lot stores in the Philadelphia region and at the Jersey Shore. The cuts, which will come from its corporate and store-support offices, include current positions and open jobs that won't be filled, Minnesota-based Supervalu said, and represent about 3.1 percent of its 35,000-employee workforce.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2013 | By Mark Sherman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Vernon Hugh Bowman seems comfortable with the old way of doing things, right down to the rotary-dial telephone he said he was using in a conference call with reporters. But the 75-year-old Indiana farmer figured out a way to benefit from a high-technology product, soybeans that are resistant to weed-killers, without always paying the high price that such genetically engineered seeds typically bring. In so doing, he ignited a legal fight with seed-giant Monsanto Co. that has now come before the Supreme Court, with argument taking place Tuesday.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Jack Kaskey and Susan Decker, Bloomberg News
DuPont Co. lied to a federal court and investors about its right to use Monsanto Co. seed technology as a central part of its defense in a patent lawsuit, a judge has ruled. DuPont "knowingly perpetrated a fraud against the court," according to a Nov. 16 order by U.S. District Judge Richard Webber unsealing sanctions he levied last December that limited the company's defenses in the lawsuit brought by Monsanto. E-mails from DuPont executives and lawyers show they knew the company didn't have an agreement allowing it to combine Monsanto's Roundup Ready soybeans with a second trait, while telling the court and public for years that it had such a right, Webber ruled.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2010
M Getting personal: Commerce Department releases personal income and spending for May. Barnes & Noble Inc. T Index releases: Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller's April and first-quarter index of home prices. Consumer Confidence Index for June. W Gulf spill hearing: Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing on industry accountability. Earnings report: Monsanto Co. T Economy: Weekly jobless claims; April construction spending; Pending home sales for May. Detroit: Automakers' vehicle sales for June.
NEWS
April 6, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shirley Sue Maring Swaab, 87, of Melrose Park, an antiques appraiser whose personal collection of memorabilia included many yo-yos, died of heart failure Sunday, March 21, at Riddle Memorial Hospital in Middletown Township, Delaware County. Born in Birmingham, Ala., Mrs. Swaab graduated from St. Petersburg (Fla.) High School in 1939 and earned a bachelor's degree in metallurgical chemistry, with a speciality in corrosion chemistry, in 1943 from the University of Alabama. From 1943 to 1947, she worked for the Monsanto Co. agricultural firm in Anniston, Ala. A son, Ronald, said that in later years she worked many jobs and was self-employed as a professional Christmas tree decorator, known as Ms. Christmas, in the 1960s.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2005 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co.'s corn seed is taking a beating. Midwest farmers turned this year to a Monsanto Co. seed that works with a popular weed-killer and fends off two potentially devastating pests. As a result, several years of gradual market-share declines in DuPont's Pioneer Hi-Bred International division in Iowa have widened to a drop of 2 or 3 percentage points this growing season. Because corn seed is produced over two years, and given regulatory limitations on developing new biotech seeds, Pioneer will likely have a tough 2006 season before it recovers.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trouble came knocking early at farmer Scott Good's door in August. "They showed up at my door 6 o'clock in the morning. They flipped a badge out," said Good, a Burlington County soybean grower. "It wasn't polite what they were saying. They acted like FBI. " The two men were private investigators. They had been watching him. Monsanto, the St. Louis agribusiness giant, had sent them. They wanted to know about his beans. Under advice of his lawyer, Good finally told them: The beans had been grown from seed saved from the previous harvest, a practice that goes back to the beginning of farming.
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