CollectionsMonsters
IN THE NEWS

Monsters

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | By John Tierno FOR THE INQUIRER
Any families out there who don't have a game plan for surviving the holidays together can head over to the Wachovia Center for "Disney on Ice presents Monsters, Inc. " The big-furry-creatures-on-ice show will open Christmas Day. Allentown native Beth Luciano, a member of the Monsters, Inc. ensemble, has skated in the Disney on Ice shows for six years and she still loves it. Luciano, who was inspired to take up skating after watching Brian...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1998 | By Nick Cristiano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ramblin' Jack Elliott is no stranger to whirlwind tours. Back in 1975, he was along on the Rolling Thunder Revue with Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and a horde of others. "Thirty-two shows in 35 days," he said a couple of weeks ago from his home outside San Francisco. "I was worried about how many clothes to bring in my bag. 'Are we going to have a chance to do laundry?' I asked Bob. . . . 'How many pairs of jeans are you taking along?' He said, 'Just one pair of Lees,' " Elliott recalled, imitating Dylan's nasal drawl.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By Billy O'Keefe, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
Monster Hunter Tri For: Wii From: Capcom ESRB Rating: Teen (blood, use of alcohol, violence) Capcom has tried and failed to persuade America to love Monster Hunter the way Japan does, but Monster Hunter Tri - imperfect and saturated with old trappings though it still is - might be where that persistence finally pays off. Should Tri's breakthrough happen, credit likely will go to the surprising support for four-player online co-op...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2002 | By DAVID GORGOS & DAVID BLEILER For the Daily News
Finally out of the shadow of that big green ogre Shrek, "Monsters, Inc. " (VHS: $24.99; DVD: $29.99) gets the spotlight all to itself this week. Disney's delightful computer-animated comedy from Pixar follows one-eyed Mike (voiced by Billy Crystal) and furry Sully (John Goodman) as they do their duties scaring kids in their closets and under their beds. While not as ambitious as "Toy Story," there is an incredible joy in the colorful animation, and Goodman and Crystal have such a natural rapport you'd think they've been a team since vaudeville.
NEWS
November 21, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Mist, a flawed, sometimes goofy, but exciting and surprisingly clever adaptation of Stephen King's horror yarn, is about a small Maine town that is suddenly enveloped by a creepy, milky fog full of unearthly, grisly creatures straight out of H.G. Wells (Food of the Gods) and Edgar Rice Burroughs (The Land That Time Forgot). It's probably the worst of the three King stories so far adapted by three-time Oscar-nominated director Frank Darabont. But this is no diss, considering that the French-born American director's previous King flicks are the critically acclaimed The Green Mile and The Shawshank Redemption.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | By Christine Donato, Special to The Inquirer
What do you get when three former school teachers turn to acting, directing and playwriting and create their own children's theater? Homework. The producers of the Stages of the Imagination theater group - who staged their original musical, Monster in the Woods, at the Montgomery County Community College this week - mail educational pre-packets to schools planning to attend their play. The lessons contain vocabulary words, a reading list and a synopsis of their production and are for teachers as well as students.
SPORTS
November 16, 2011
THEIR FACES. The mix of confusion, self-torture, unfettered agony. It's a memory I'll take to my grave, that warm, summer twilight several years ago, when a cluster of baseball parents tried to wrap their heads around the unconscionable, that one of their own was one of those child-preying monsters they read about from time to time, in towns they often had to look up on maps. This was their town, though. This was the president of the organization, for God's sake, a guy everyone knew, a guy with a son of his own, a guy whose house they had all been invited to, a house some of their kids had spent sleepovers in. Now here he was on the front page of the local newspaper, his past chasing him down finally, more than 10 years after his conviction for child sexual assault, and only two towns over from where it occurred.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012 | David R. Stampone, FOR THE INQUIRER
Add the Icelandic sextet Of Monsters and Men to that list of rock acts with a "Philadelphia story. " Joined by seventh musician Ragnhildur Gunnarsdóttir on trumpet, accordion, and keyboards, the cheerful Icelanders delivered an exultant 90-minute set at the Theatre of Living Arts on Tuesday. It was the first of two sold-out nights and their purposefully chosen live Philadelphia debut, coming on the release date of their keenly anticipated debut album, My Head Is an Animal. The Philly honor roll that Of Monsters and Men has now joined includes old regional faves such as Yes and Peter Frampton (both playing before 130,000 at a gate-crashed JFK Stadium gig in June '76)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2010 | By HOWARD GENSLER, gensleh@phillynews.com 215-854-5678
At the Toronto International Film Festival, members of the media interview people from all over the world, but it's rare to interview them while they still have their luggage. Gareth Edwards was at TIFF to talk about his new movie, "Monsters" (opening tomorrow), and the Daily News caught up with him in the bar at the Hyatt Hotel, moments after he'd arrived from London. Fortunately, Edwards was able to sleep on his flight. With "Monsters" appearing in so many festivals, he's become accustomed to snoozing on planes.
NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Touring with Jim James, M. Ward, and Mike Mogis in the indie super group Monsters of Folk has been like "a fantasy, an erotic dream" for Conor Oberst. The acclaimed songwriter doesn't mean that in a kinky way, though these Monsters - who will don shiny suits to play the Academy of Music Monday in support of their self-titled debut album - showed a talent for role playing by dressing up as Kiss in Louisville on Halloween. The Omaha singer/guitarist is simply saying the spotlight-sharing shows have been thoroughly gratifying for all. This week, Oberst and James - the singer for the Louisville rock band My Morning Jacket with the celestial sans vibrato voice - sat together for a speakerphone chat backstage from Toronto's Massey Hall.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
An invasion has landed on the beaches of Wildwood. Through Sunday, the resort will host Monsters on the Beach, a monster-truck racing competition between Lincoln and Spencer Avenues. For those new to the world of monster trucks, the souped-up vehicles measure up to their beastly moniker. Consisting of a modified pickup truck or SUV body with supersize tires and an upgraded suspension to match, the average truck has a height and width of 12 feet and weighs from 10,000 to 12,000 pounds.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
BELLEFONTE, Pa. - Testifying Friday in a bid for a new trial, Jerry Sandusky unleashed a torrent of attacks on the process that sent him to prison. He lambasted his trial lawyer's decision to keep him off the witness stand. He questioned rulings by the judge that gave him just months to prepare his defense. And as for the eight young men who in 2012 persuaded jurors he was a serial sexual predator - "what they call victims" is how Sandusky contemptuously described them - the former Pennsylvania State University coach forcefully sought to impugn their credibility.
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
The good news about the venomous clinging jellyfish recently found in North Jersey is that they inhabit shallow inland waterways, not surf. The bad news - as a college student learned last month - is that their sting is dangerous and agonizingly painful. And these one-inch sea monsters might be spreading toward South Jersey. "It's really awful," said John Gaynor, a molecular biologist called in by the state to research the jelly's whereabouts. "I don't know that there's anything that can be done to keep them out. " Gaynor, who studies jellyfish at Montclair State University, was standing Friday on the dock of his vacation home in Brick, which overlooks the broad Metedeconk River in Ocean County.
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
George Clooney and Julia Roberts spend a lot of time talking to each other in Money Monster - urgently, intimately, sometimes as though their lives depended on it. Which, in this taut hostage drama, happens to be the case. And yet, the two stars share the same physical space, the same frame, for only a few fleeting minutes at the beginning and end of the Jodie Foster-directed thriller. That's because Roberts' character, Patty Fenn, is a TV producer, in a control room full of consoles and monitors, engineers, and assistants.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Whit MacLaughlin's new show, O Monsters First Draft , is dazzling. Puzzling, but dazzling. Tapping the talents of four remarkable actors, he seems to have undertaken nothing less than a theatrical meditation on the mysterious and dangerous universe human beings inhabit. Bhob Rainey composed a hair-raising sound design and also had a hand in the show's conception. Devised theater is a play without a playwright. The cast and director develop a show around a topic or an idea, and then the collaborative, improvised result is fixed for the rest of the run. This is a growing trend in the theater world, with understandably varying results.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
I've fallen in love with so many movie Elizabeth Bennets, I've lost count. The heroine of Jane Austen's perennial book-club favorite, Pride and Prejudice , has been portrayed by more than a dozen actors, including Greer Garson, Jennifer Ehle, and Keira Knightly . Inspiring all, every one of these Elizabeths has reached heights of sublimity in sex appeal, coyness, or wit. But none knows her way around a katana or a karate kick...
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | BY DAN GERINGER, Staff Writer
SEPTA General Manager Jeff Knueppel, who announced Monday that 75 percent of the blizzard-battered public-transit system was running again, said he was teased by a reporter earlier this winter after buying gigantic snow-fighting machines. The 28-year SEPTA veteran, who has battled the four biggest snowstorms in Philadelphia history, oversaw the purchase of a rail-riding, snow-throwing monster truck with a rotating arm that looks like something out of Mad Max: Fury Road . "It was the age-old situation where you buy a snowblower and there's a winter with no snow," Knueppel told the Daily News, laughing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2015 | Reprinted from earlier editions. By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Almost certainly, the brains behind Victor Frankenstein - set first in 1860s London, then in a jagged castle on the rocky Scottish coast - were out to mimic the steampunk vibe of Robert Downey Jr.'s hit Sherlock Holmes pics. The cogs and gears and smokestacks of the Industrial Revolution grind and clang and hiss, a Scotland Yard inspector furrows his brow in forensic disdain, and an eccentric genius dashes to and fro, occasionally resorting to gunplay and pyrotechnics to elude his pursuers.
SPORTS
October 21, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Brooklyn Nets defender Justin Harper was helpless. The 6-foot-10 forward could only meagerly raise his arms as Richaun Holmes soared over him on Sunday afternoon. The Sixers rookie used two hands to posterize Harper, grabbing his first highlight-reel worthy dunk since being drafted in June. Holmes, a 6-10 forward, was a flashy dunker in college at Bowling Green. It was only a matter of time until he threw down his first thunderous slam with the Sixers. "It's probably No. 1 right now," Holmes said about his dunk after Sunday's 92-91 loss.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|