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NEWS
August 16, 2012
WASHINGTON - The Rev. Sun Myung Moon, founder of the Unification Church, is being treated for pneumonia in an intensive-care unit at a Seoul hospital. The Rev. Joshua Cotter, vice president of the Unification Church USA, said Moon entered the hospital on Monday and was in critical condition. He said church members were praying and fasting for his quick recovery. A memo sent to church officials early Wednesday states that Moon, 93, "was pushing his limits in carrying out his schedule" when he fell ill and that his wife and children were with him. - Associated Press
NEWS
December 23, 1999 | G. W. Miller III / Daily News
The LAST full moon of the 1900s appeared over the Philadelphia skyline last night, brighter than usual because it's the winter solstice, meaning the moon is closer to the Earth than normal full moons.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MATTHEW ERICSON
The search for extraterrestrial life will start down a new path today. Galileo, which has been traveling around Jupiter for more than a year, will swoop close to the moon Europa. Scientists hope to collect detailed photos giving clues about whether the moon once supported life.
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rev. Sun Myung Moon spoke in Center City last night without a hitch. That's a far cry from Moon's appearance just 11 days ago at Olympic Stadium in Seoul, Korea, where the controversial minister hitched some 30,000 couples - and tens of thousands more via satellite - at his largest mass wedding ceremony ever. There weren't any wedding bells last night at the Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, where Moon kicked off a 15-city U.S. speaking tour before a packed banquet room of about 800 true believers and truly curious.
NEWS
September 17, 1986 | By Arlene Martin, Special to The Inquirer (Inquirer correspondents Christine M. Johnson and Theresa Conroy contributed to this article.)
Tomorrow, the moon will swell to its outer rim and gleam down in the night. Lovers will sit and gaze at each other, moon-eyed. Dog walkers will stare at the moon while their pets pause to bay at the magic glow. Farmers will praise the harvest moon, crooners will celebrate its silvery light. But in the world of law enforcement, the principal response to the fullness of the moon will be a collective moan. "I don't even have to look outside," said Colleen Pierce, who has been with the Berlin Police Department for nine years.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | by John S. Lewis
In 1910, a graduate student at Clark University recorded a wildly improbable prediction in his journal: that the presence of ice on the Moon would allow human explorers an opportunity for autonomy off Earth. That student was Robert H. Goddard, father of practical rocketry. The detection of possible ice deposits by the Pentagon's low-cost Clementine mission has led some to say we are close to realizing Goddard's tempting prospect of a foothold off Earth. Water is the most valuable natural resource in the solar system, key ingredient of rocket propulsion systems and potential space biospheres.
NEWS
January 6, 2004 | By CHRISTOPHER GIBBONS
ON DEC. 14, 1972, Apollo astronaut Gene Cernan paused and looked out at the magnificent vista before him, and spoke the last words heard from the surface of the moon: "America's challenge of today has forged man's destiny of tomorrow. We leave as we came, and God willing, as we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind. " Cernan often laments the fact that he has the dubious distinction of being the last man on the moon because he knows that 31 years have passed, and the farthest that humans have traveled since then has been to low Earth orbit.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"Favorites of the Moon" ("Les Favoris de la Lune"). A comedy directed by Otar Iossliani from a screenplay by Gerard Brach and Iosseliani. Photographed by Philippe Theaudiere. Edited by Dominique Bellfort. Music by Nicolas Zourabichvill. Artistic collaboration: Catherine Foulon, Dimitri Eristavi and Leila Naskidachvill. Running time: 101 minutes. In French with English subtitles. A Spectrafilm release. One week only starting Friday, at the Roxy. The most audacious movie of the summer turns out not to be one of the season's premeditated blockbusters but a rather inaccessible 1984 French- Italian co-production made by a Soviet director.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
America had no crack, no AIDS and no Sesame Street. Stamps were 6 cents. Bridge tolls were 50 cents. Haircuts, for males seeking them, were $3.50. There was a Woman's Medical College, a Pennsylvania Military College, and, Lord help us, 29 individual draft boards in Philadelphia. There were Blood, Sweat and Tears, Blind Faith, and Three Dog Night. Elvis and Hendrix were still alive. Judy Garland had just died, and at the top of the pop music charts was an ominous tune about the future, "In the Year 2525.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mother. Virgin. Whore. This is the repertory of roles the unfortunate Josie Hogan gets to choose from in Eugene O'Neill's late classic, A Moon for the Misbegotten. But, in most respects, the man Josie loves is in far worse shape: James Tyrone Jr. is a dissolute, self-hating drunk, whose charm can't disguise the pain of a man hurtling toward destruction. The third principal character in this lyrical drama, which opened Friday at the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival at Allentown College, is no great shakes either.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
It isn't every day, as Josh O'Neill put it, that you have an opportunity to publish work that shows something akin to a "teenage Shakespeare becoming Shakespeare. " But that's what O'Neill's Locust Moon Press in West Philadelphia believes it is doing. This week, Locust Moon officially brings out The Lost Work of Will Eisner , a 70-page compendium of the legendary cartoonist's very early work, much of it never seen before. For those unfamiliar with Eisner, who died in 2005, legendary is not a word used lightly here.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Releasing your super-secret, heretofore not-known-to-exist album with absolutely no advance notice to surprise the internet and snap the music world to attention? That's soooo early 2016, like something Kendrick Lamar would have done - and did, with his unexpected Untitled Unmastered - way back in March, for goodness sake. The new strategy, it seems, for fans trying to to figure out how they can actually listen to new music by their favorite acts, is a little different. Instead of ambushing them out of the blue - as Beyoncé did in 2013 when she revealed her previous, self-titled album with a midnight Instagram post - you tease with a hint beforehand, so fans can be ready to convene for a virtual listening party.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Rich Cohen, a veteran journalist and co-creator of HBO's Vinyl , achieves the unlikely feat of adding a worthy Rolling Stones book to an overcrowded shelf, full of personal recollections and astute observations. Spiegel & Grau, $30.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
Dig in Deep (Redwing ***1/2) Bonnie Raitt reintroduces herself like an old friend: The opening track, "Unintended Consequence of Love," is quintessential Bonnie - a mid-tempo, R&B-laced number that allows her longtime band to, well, dig in deep on the groove while she adds some of her emotive slide guitar. Raitt and her crew rock it up even harder on Los Lobos' "Shakin' Shakin' Shakes" and her own "The Comin' Round Is Going Through. " But the digging deep the album title refers to involves not just the approach to the music, but the emotional content of the songs themselves: The continuing rewards of the 66-year-old Raitt lie in hearing how she uses these familiar forms to cut to the bone.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
President Obama's Tuesday night address to Congress was less about the state of the union than the state of the presidency. And the state of this presidency is spent. The signs of intellectual exhaustion were everywhere. Consider just three. After taking credit for success in Syria, raising American stature abroad, and prevailing against the Islamic State - one claim more surreal than the next - Obama was forced to repair to his most well-worn talking point: "If you doubt America's commitment - or mine - to see that justice is done, just ask Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
A Moon for the Misbegotten , Eugene O'Neill's last mighty play, is at the Independence Studio at the Walnut Street Theatre, about to start a 15-city tour. It is an exhausting play to watch (so long, so sad, so much blather about pigs, so many lies), so I can only imagine how exhausting it must be to perform. Even more so if you are just recovering from a leg amputation, as Michael Toner is, after a hit-and-run accident seven months ago. He is a superb actor, and he plays Hogan with such twinkly charm, such authenticity, and such a tasty Irish accent that the performance would be a triumph without admiring his strength of will to return to the stage.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John M. Moon, 94, of Rosemont, a chocolate-company executive, churchman, sailor, and motorcyclist into his 80s, died Friday, July 3, at his home of causes due to aging. His life centered on service to Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church and successive careers at Whitman's Chocolates and Godiva Chocolatier. A cheerful presence, Mr. Moon, known as "Jack," was loved by family and neighbors, churchgoers, and the merchants with whom he did business. "His sense of humor in regaling hilarious stories was contagious to all around him," his family said in a tribute.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Moon Man Walk is the first of six productions of Orbiter 3, a new playwrights' collective in Philadelphia, created to give new scripts a chance to be seen. James Ijames, the author of Moon Man Walk , is an excellent high-profile starting point, having scooped up Barrymore Awards, Pew grants, and all manner of career-making prizes. Last summer, we saw his brilliant tragicomedy, The Most Spectacularly Lamentable Trial of Miz Martha Washington . But unlike that fiercely unsentimental work, Moon Man Walk is a quieter, sweeter, smaller play, about one "mighty manboy" named Monarch (Lindsay Smiling)
NEWS
June 1, 2015
Seveneves By Neal Stephenson William Morrow. 880 pp. $35 Reviewed by Scott F. Andrews Neal Stephenson's palindromic Seveneves demands your attention from the first sentence: "The moon blew up without warning and for no apparent reason. " This opening may sound absurd, but readers can count on Stephenson to deliver credible science and satisfying narrative. Not that Stephenson has anything left to prove. He's won just about every major award the science-fiction community offers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
There's a certain type of American man who never changes and never disappears. Often overlooked, and even looked down upon, he nonetheless degrades himself in humiliating jobs to support his family while clinging to dreams of wealth and fame. On television, this man has appeared by many names: Al Bundy, Homer Simpson, Fred Flintstone, and Ralph Kramden. The latter finds life on stage as Scottie (Scott Greer) in 1812 Productions' To the Moon. Jen Childs and her creative team wrote To the Moon as an homage to the comedy style of Jackie Gleason, with Greer standing in for The Honeymooners star in a number of respects.
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