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Moon Landing

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NEWS
July 17, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
The U.S. Postal Service will recall the 25th anniversary of man's landing on the moon, on July 20, 1969, with two stamps on Wednesday. First-day ceremonies will be held at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, with an Apollo landing module serving as a backdrop in the main hall. The stamps are 29 cents for the first-class rate and $9.95 for express mail. Both stamps depict an astronaut holding the American flag and walking on the moon's surface, with the Earth in the background.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
So what did a small band of Down Under country bumpkins, with their pots of tea and Marmite sandwiches, headquartered in the middle of a working farm, have to do with that historic day in July 1969 when Neil Armstrong touched down on the moon? Well, as the story - which happens to be true, if somewhat colorfully embellished in the Australian charmer The Dish - goes, they had everything to do with it. Without the toil and knob-tweaking at a satellite receiving station built on a sheep paddock in Parkes, New South Wales, nobody in the world would have witnessed that landmark lunar landing.
NEWS
July 21, 2009
TELEVISION PAID tribute to Walter Cronkite over the weekend by airing his coverage of the first moon landing - 40 years ago yesterday. Cronkite's unusually emotional "Oh, boy!" on July 20, 1969, was not only a reminder of the legendary journalist - and what journalism used to be - but also of a time before science was politicized and respect for it degraded. The moon landing was a moment of triumph for the primacy of science, but in the 40 years since, its place in society has steadily eroded.
NEWS
June 13, 2010
Robert J. Wussler, 73, a CNN cofounder who became the youngest president of the CBS television network when he took over in 1976 at age 39, died June 5 at his home in Westport, Conn., after a long illness. Mr. Wussler started his 21-year career at CBS in the mail room. He eventually became executive producer of CBS News, overseeing special projects including the 1969 moon landing. In 1978, Mr. Wussler formed a production company, Pyramid Enterprises. It produced syndicated programming for the international marketplace, specializing in Japan, France, and the former Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013
Network for New Music The Arc of Curiosity traces the progression of American electronic composers from the first-ever computer (1946) to present-day composers such as James Primosch and Paul Lansky. So the music will be far more than experimental. (At Penn's Rose Recital Hall, April 5.) Choir of King's College, Cambridge The venerable group performs Benjamin Britten's beloved A Boy Was Born (written when the composer was 19, in sophisticated eight-part harmony), along with works by Byrd, Blow, and Purcell.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bill Graham is hoping to take some knowledge a long way, all the way, in fact, to the Shiloh Elementary School in Sardis, Ala., where reference books date back further than the 1969 moon landing. Graham said he and members of the Chester Pike Rotary Club in Ridley Township noticed the school's plight in January, when ABC Evening News presented a feature on the underfunded school. The report said some books used in the school had been printed before the moon landing. The Ridley School District responded to Graham's request for aid and agreed to provide hundreds of used textbooks for the kindergarten-through- eighth- grade Shiloh school.
NEWS
July 22, 2009 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Buzz Aldrin, the second human to walk on the moon, retired from the Air Force, he was offered $800,000 to appear in a commercial for Volkswagen. "I thought this civilian life was going to be pretty good," Aldrin, 79, told a packed auditorium at the Free Library last night. But he struggled with depression and alcoholism. Those recollections of his life during and after the historic Apollo 11 moon landing 40 years ago are contained in his new book, Magnificent Desolation. He went public with his depression in a newspaper commentary piece and later chaired the board of the National Association of Mental Health.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2016
'CONSTRUCTING PLAY: CLASSIC BUILDING TOYS' The long: Each winter, the Center for Architecture exhibits 50-plus antique, vintage and modern toy building sets. This go-round, the center gallery is closed for renovation, so the smallish show goes on in City Hall. The short: Lotsa little LEGOS, and friends. The demo: Budding builders old enough to resist touching the displays. The oldie: Friedrich Froebel's 175-year-old wooden building blocks, considered the first of their kind, inspired Frank Lincoln Wright the kid to become Frank Lloyd Wright, architect.
NEWS
October 30, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
More than 33 years after the United States landed men on the moon, NASA is spending more than $15,000 to convince people that it really did happen and that the space agency did not make it all up. Stubborn conspiracy theorists claim NASA's six Apollo-program moon landings were faked. After decades of belittling and ignoring them, NASA has decided to fight back. It hired James Oberg, a Houston-based former aerospace engineer and award-winning author of 10 books on space, to confront skeptics point by point.
NEWS
July 30, 2009
YOUR EDITORIAL of July 21 would be laughable if it weren't so awfully out of touch with the truth. Your essay bemoans the politicization of science since the Apollo 11 moon landing, placing blame on ideologues and, by implication, conservatives. The fact is that ever since Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins returned to Earth on July 24, 1969, liberal politicians have steadily cut the space program budget in order to fund entitlements, while the activist left has usurped scientific research and has used it to further their extreme programs.
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NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
CLEVELAND - Expectations are soaring. Cory Booker arrives here a day after helping lead a 15-hour Senate filibuster demanding votes on gun laws, and amid chatter about his chances to become Hillary Clinton's running mate. The lunch crowd of roughly 300 Democrats sipping iced tea in a Westin ballroom buzz about the Senate blockade and one of their party's rising stars. Far from New Jersey, many here are already familiar with Booker, a testament to his political celebrity, talent for grabbing attention and broad personal appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2016
'CONSTRUCTING PLAY: CLASSIC BUILDING TOYS' The long: Each winter, the Center for Architecture exhibits 50-plus antique, vintage and modern toy building sets. This go-round, the center gallery is closed for renovation, so the smallish show goes on in City Hall. The short: Lotsa little LEGOS, and friends. The demo: Budding builders old enough to resist touching the displays. The oldie: Friedrich Froebel's 175-year-old wooden building blocks, considered the first of their kind, inspired Frank Lincoln Wright the kid to become Frank Lloyd Wright, architect.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Having performed John Cage's supremely spare (and deeply economical) 4'33" of silence earlier this season, Orchestra 2001 was living particularly large in its contribution to the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts with a 40-member group performing Gorecki's Symphony No. 3 (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs) . The time-travel-themed PIFA landmarks for Saturday's program at Church of the Holy Trinity were the 1939 invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany and the 1969 Apollo moon landing, commemorated by George Crumb's Night of the Four Moons . Crumb is a natural choice, given Swarthmore-based 2001's longtime association with the Media composer.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Brian Vastag, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The next giant leap in space exploration may be a short hop on a small space rock. This week, President Obama will request $105 million in NASA's 2014 budget for a mission that would capture a small asteroid, tug it near the moon, and later send astronauts to study it and grab samples. The asteroid-capturing robot could launch as soon as 2017, with astronauts flying to meet it near the moon by 2021, according to a NASA briefing presented to Congressrecently. The president's request includes $78 million for NASA to develop technologies for the project and $27 million for beefing up the agency's asteroid-detection work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013
Network for New Music The Arc of Curiosity traces the progression of American electronic composers from the first-ever computer (1946) to present-day composers such as James Primosch and Paul Lansky. So the music will be far more than experimental. (At Penn's Rose Recital Hall, April 5.) Choir of King's College, Cambridge The venerable group performs Benjamin Britten's beloved A Boy Was Born (written when the composer was 19, in sophisticated eight-part harmony), along with works by Byrd, Blow, and Purcell.
NEWS
March 4, 2012
Mike Matz directs the Pew Environment Group's Campaign for America's Wilderness Seventy-five years ago, Theodor Geisel wrote the first of his 44 popular books for children under the pen name Dr. Seuss. Included among such fanciful classics as The Cat in the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham is one of my family's all-time favorites, The Lorax . My wife and I can hardly wait to take our children to see the new film adaptation - not only for fun but because it explains so well what I do. One of the most recognizable quotes from The Lorax is: "I speak for the trees.
TRAVEL
January 15, 2012
I was staring at a beautiful tree frog - its tiny, bright green body with huge black eyes and cute little pods on its feet that were perfectly designed by nature to stick to any surface. There was only one problem: Those cute little pod feet were perched on the toilet seat I was about to use, and they weren't letting go. This was not a camping trip or a portable toilet in a national park. This was our home life in Australia's bush country. After a month in cosmopolitan Sydney, we were itching to see "the real Australia" - the land famous for wide-open spaces and wild kangaroos.
NEWS
May 3, 2011
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. I believed the moon landing happened because I saw it on television, and I had no problem believing Lee Harvey Oswald acting alone. But the killing of Osama bin Laden feels fictional. First is the fact that he was living in Abbottabad, a major city in Pakistan near the Pakistani military academy and that, supposedly, no one knew it. Second, our forces lost no one despite having a helicopter crash. Finally, there is the lack of a body on display.
NEWS
June 21, 2010 | By Charles Krauthammer
Barack Obama doesn't do the mundane. He was sent to us to do larger things. You could see that plainly in his Oval Office address on the gulf oil spill. He could barely get himself through the pedestrian first half: a bit of BP-bashing, a bit of faux-Clintonian "I feel your pain," a bit of recovery and economic mitigation accounting. It wasn't until the end of the speech - the let-no-crisis-go-to-waste part that tried to leverage the Gulf Coast devastation to advance his cap-and-trade climate-change agenda - that Obama warmed to his task.
NEWS
June 13, 2010
Robert J. Wussler, 73, a CNN cofounder who became the youngest president of the CBS television network when he took over in 1976 at age 39, died June 5 at his home in Westport, Conn., after a long illness. Mr. Wussler started his 21-year career at CBS in the mail room. He eventually became executive producer of CBS News, overseeing special projects including the 1969 moon landing. In 1978, Mr. Wussler formed a production company, Pyramid Enterprises. It produced syndicated programming for the international marketplace, specializing in Japan, France, and the former Soviet Union.
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