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Moon River

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NEWS
September 27, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS - With a string of gold albums, a hit TV series and his signature "Moon River," Andy Williams was a voice of the 1960s, although not the '60s we usually hear about. The singer - known for his easy-listening style and his wholesome middle-America appeal - was the antithesis of the counterculture that gave rise to rock 'n' roll. Williams' plaintive tenor, boyish features and clean-cut demeanor helped him outlast many of the decade's rock stars and fellow crooners, such as Frank Sinatra and Perry Como.
NEWS
July 17, 1987 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
In 1943, when the members of Glenn Miller's Army Air Force Band were taking basic training at Atlantic City's Ambassador Hotel, one of the recruits was a Juilliard-trained young pianist/arranger who was trying out for the band that Miller led in England before being killed in a 1944 plane crash. In his book, "Glenn Miller and His Orchestra," jazz critic George Simon recalls that the soldier was a "shy but very warm" musician who had done some arranging for the Claude Thornhill and Randy Brooks bands.
NEWS
July 21, 2002 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Will Smith, Wynnefield's gift to Hollywood, is looking to revive a vintage concept about the fame game for a forthcoming film. He's working on recruiting Jennifer Lopez for a remake of A Star Is Born. "This . . . might work if we can get our schedules together," Smith told Newsweek. Joel Schumacher has agreed to help develop the project and may direct. The original film, made in 1937, starred Janet Gaynor as an unknown actress who marries a movie legend (Fredric March). Their union is strained when her career begins to eclipse his. At the end, the sad spouse walks into the ocean to drown.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If one role, and one movie, defines the gamine essence of Audrey Hepburn, it's arguably Holly Golightly in Blake Edwards' 1961 gem, Breakfast at Tiffany's. It's the tale of a charming waif who arrives in bustling New York City and makes a living by - well, that part is left a little vague, as were many matters of sex and romance in prudish, early-'60s Hollywood. Adapted from a Truman Capote novella, and featuring George Peppard as the upstairs neighbor whose feelings toward Holly are in a bit of a tangle, this airy classic is sweet and sentimental in the most glamorous, dressed-up sort of way. With its misty, melancholy Henry Mancini score (and theme song, "Moon River")
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Jim Salter and Bob Thomas, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - With a string of gold albums, a hit TV series, and the signature "Moon River," Andy Williams was a voice of the 1960s, although not the '60s we usually hear about. The singer, known for his easy-listening style and wholesome, middle-America appeal, was the antithesis of the counterculture that gave rise to rock and roll. The 84-year-old entertainer died Tuesday night at his home in Branson, Mo., after a yearlong battle with bladder cancer, his Los Angeles publicist, Paul Shefrin, said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | by Jonathan Takiff Daily News Staff Writer
If you have ears for music - almost any kind of music - then this is one weekend to get up and prowl. From the best of big-band Hollywood to the newest in avant-garde jazz, with the trippiest thing in techno and the truest icons of folk, Philadelphia's clubs and concert-throwers have you covered. Dance trance: If electronic music goes big time, as some trendies predict, it'll likely ride on the backs of Manchester, England, player/producers Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons, known collectively as Chemical Brothers.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Henry Mancini, the swing-loving pianist whose jazzy themes for Peter Gunn, The Pink Panther and Breakfast at Tiffany's defined the American soundtrack in the 1960s, died yesterday of liver and pancreatic cancer at his home in Beverly Hills. At the bedside of the 70-year-old composer-conductor was his wife of 47 years, Ginny, a former jazz singer. The Mancini mantel was crowded with Henry's numerous awards. In all, there were 20 Grammys, including one for "Baby Elephant Walk," the theme from the film Hatari!
NEWS
April 2, 2004 | By Dominic Sama FOR THE INQUIRER
As a youth, Henry Mancini learned from his music-loving father to play the flute and piccolo. But those gave way to the piano, the instrument that launched Mancini on a stellar career as a composer and scorer for films and television. The U.S. Postal Service is honoring that career with a 37-cent commemorative that will be issued April 13. Mancini's nearly 100 film credits included Breakfast at Tiffany's, Days of Wine and Roses, and the Pink Panther series. The traipsing panther is squeezed in the lower left corner of the stamp design, with Mancini directing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990 | By Patricia O'Haire, New York Daily News
There's hardly a moviegoer, TV watcher or music listener around who hasn't heard something written by Henry Mancini. The tall, quiet, 65-year-old composer-performer-arranger has won so many awards over the years he's running out of shelf space on which to store them, and he has a home in Los Angeles with plenty of room. Let's take a look at his record: He has been nominated for 70 Grammys and has walked home with 20. He was nominated for 18 Academy Awards and went home with four Oscars.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1994 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Video, like other branches of the media, is in a marketing frenzy over the O.J. Simpson case. About a dozen tapes on Simpson and his troubles have been rushed into stores, some under the imprimatur of network news organizations and all playing off the sensational double murder of which he stands accused. But videotape now has an "instant publishing" rival from an even higher- tech plane: The People v. O.J. Simpson, an "interactive" casebook on the affair put together on CD-ROM for the computer crowd by Turner Home Entertainment.
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NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Rich, easy notes slide out of Gilly DiBenedetto's clarinet, filling the room, until the old man stops and lowers his instrument. "I can't play no more," he says in a whisper brittle enough to make it sound like the truth. Then he promptly moistens his lips, raises the clarinet, and resumes the tune. It seems more likely that DiBenedetto can't not play - even against the odds. Once the band director at the storied Downingtown Inn, to which Mickey Rooney lent his name and presence, the 87-year-old was supposed to be gone by now. Battling three cancers, he was given two months to live in July.
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS - With a string of gold albums, a hit TV series and his signature "Moon River," Andy Williams was a voice of the 1960s, although not the '60s we usually hear about. The singer - known for his easy-listening style and his wholesome middle-America appeal - was the antithesis of the counterculture that gave rise to rock 'n' roll. Williams' plaintive tenor, boyish features and clean-cut demeanor helped him outlast many of the decade's rock stars and fellow crooners, such as Frank Sinatra and Perry Como.
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Jim Salter and Bob Thomas, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - With a string of gold albums, a hit TV series, and the signature "Moon River," Andy Williams was a voice of the 1960s, although not the '60s we usually hear about. The singer, known for his easy-listening style and wholesome, middle-America appeal, was the antithesis of the counterculture that gave rise to rock and roll. The 84-year-old entertainer died Tuesday night at his home in Branson, Mo., after a yearlong battle with bladder cancer, his Los Angeles publicist, Paul Shefrin, said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 25, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bolstering hopes for a permanent moon base, NASA announced yesterday that three separate spacecraft had detected signs of water over the lunar surface. The moon is still far drier than the most parched desert, but some experts say there's enough water in the soil and rocks to extract and supply a lunar base. In theory, they could squeeze a quart out of every cubic yard of moon dirt. Paul Spudis, a scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, said finding so much water there was surprising.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If one role, and one movie, defines the gamine essence of Audrey Hepburn, it's arguably Holly Golightly in Blake Edwards' 1961 gem, Breakfast at Tiffany's. It's the tale of a charming waif who arrives in bustling New York City and makes a living by - well, that part is left a little vague, as were many matters of sex and romance in prudish, early-'60s Hollywood. Adapted from a Truman Capote novella, and featuring George Peppard as the upstairs neighbor whose feelings toward Holly are in a bit of a tangle, this airy classic is sweet and sentimental in the most glamorous, dressed-up sort of way. With its misty, melancholy Henry Mancini score (and theme song, "Moon River")
NEWS
April 2, 2004 | By Dominic Sama FOR THE INQUIRER
As a youth, Henry Mancini learned from his music-loving father to play the flute and piccolo. But those gave way to the piano, the instrument that launched Mancini on a stellar career as a composer and scorer for films and television. The U.S. Postal Service is honoring that career with a 37-cent commemorative that will be issued April 13. Mancini's nearly 100 film credits included Breakfast at Tiffany's, Days of Wine and Roses, and the Pink Panther series. The traipsing panther is squeezed in the lower left corner of the stamp design, with Mancini directing.
NEWS
July 21, 2002 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Will Smith, Wynnefield's gift to Hollywood, is looking to revive a vintage concept about the fame game for a forthcoming film. He's working on recruiting Jennifer Lopez for a remake of A Star Is Born. "This . . . might work if we can get our schedules together," Smith told Newsweek. Joel Schumacher has agreed to help develop the project and may direct. The original film, made in 1937, starred Janet Gaynor as an unknown actress who marries a movie legend (Fredric March). Their union is strained when her career begins to eclipse his. At the end, the sad spouse walks into the ocean to drown.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
While most of America slept, the space version of a radio alarm clock tuned to Radio 340 (as in miles up) awakened John Glenn and the crew of the space shuttle Discovery on Monday morning with a special long-distance dedication: From Annie for her Golden Oldie, John, taking you back to 1962, here is Andy Williams' "Moon River. " The selection and dedication revved Glenn to the point that he momentarily forgot where he was, responding as if he were in Houston calling the shuttle instead of floating far above Earth aboard Discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1997 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Remember what the emperor says to a bemused Mozart in Amadeus? "Too many notes. " One of Peter Nero's big problems in putting together a TV show on lyricist and composer Johnny Mercer was too many songs. Something like 1,400 over a career spanning nearly half a century. To cull about 20 from those, getting the right mix of romantic and playful, dreamy and bouncy, plus suiting the songs to the singers, was a time-consuming job. "I worked on that show for about three months," Nero said.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | by Jonathan Takiff Daily News Staff Writer
If you have ears for music - almost any kind of music - then this is one weekend to get up and prowl. From the best of big-band Hollywood to the newest in avant-garde jazz, with the trippiest thing in techno and the truest icons of folk, Philadelphia's clubs and concert-throwers have you covered. Dance trance: If electronic music goes big time, as some trendies predict, it'll likely ride on the backs of Manchester, England, player/producers Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons, known collectively as Chemical Brothers.
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