FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
April 28, 2007 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For La Salle High's Brian Moore, this was the pinnacle of his career. For Chestnut Hill Academy's Wayne Crawford, it was something to build on. Both Southeastern Pennsylvania standouts recorded second-place finishes in yesterday's high school portion of the 113th Penn Relays. Crawford was the runner-up in the boys' shot put with a heave of 58 feet, 5 3/4 inches. Mike Alleman of Scotch Plains-Fanwood (N.J.) won the event with a 58-8 1/2 effort. Archbishop Carroll's Tom Cicoli rounded out the top three at 57-5.
SPORTS
November 18, 1992 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Both men threw enough bombs to warrant a blackout. They dug hooks into ribs, crashed uppercuts into jaws, and thrilled a crowd of about 1,200 at the Blue Horizon in North Philadelphia with every brutal punch. In the end - and it came mercifully early - Rockin' Rodney Moore had just a little more firepower last night than Louie Lomeli. Moore scored a technical knockout over Lomeli in the second round of a scheduled 10-round junior-welterweight bout. Referee Rudy Battle stopped the match with only 15 seconds left in the round.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
If Michael Moore wanted to a cause less of a ruckus at the TV critics tour, he could have dumped jalapeno dip onto everyone's lap. The executive producer of "TV Nation" on NBC told television critics about a piece he produced for a special in December that showed radical anti- abortionists advocating the assassination of President Clinton and members of the Supreme Court. "The people in advertising did not feel that they had enough time to try and find the right advertisers," Moore said.
SPORTS
June 5, 1991 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rockin' Rodney Moore, who had seemed sluggish in the first round, came back to score a devastating technical knockout over Sammy Fuentes in the second round of a scheduled 10-round junior-welterweight bout last night at the Blue Horizon. Referee Frank Cappuccino stopped the bout at 2 minutes, 9 seconds of the round. Moore, of Philadelphia, extended his winning streak to 17 straight bouts and raised his record to 27-6-2. Fuentes, of Puerto Rico, fell to 21-8-1. "I let him take me out of my game plan," Moore said.
SPORTS
March 6, 1991 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
North Philadelphia's Rockin' Rodney Moore rocked Cleveland's Raul Torres all over the ring but didn't get what he wanted. "The guy wouldn't go down," said Moore, who scored an eight-round TKO last night in a scheduled 10-round junior-welterweight bout at a packed Blue Horizon before an estimated 1,300. Torres' corner stopped the fight after the eighth round, when both fighters were in their corners. Torres (10-6-2) took all kinds of punches to the head and body early in the fight, and by the seventh round, he was simply trying to survive.
SPORTS
September 25, 1990 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rockin' Rodney Moore, who acquired his nickname in his days as a part-time disc jockey at various nightclubs in the Philadelphia area, still makes people dance. Nowadays, he does it by disrupting their neurological systems, sending them into spasms and twitches and jerks. He brains them. Moore, who seemed on his way to doing just that last night, had to settle for an efficient but exciting unanimous decision over Jerry Page in a 10-round junior-welterweight bout at Harrah's Marina Hotel Casino.
NEWS
March 1, 2012
Retired Municipal Court Judge Jimmie Moore announced Wednesday that he was giving up his primary-election challenge to U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, the Philadelphia congressman and city Democratic Party chief. The two issued a joint statement in which Brady praised Moore for making a "selfless decision to withdraw his candidacy in the best interest of the unity of the Democratic Party of Philadelphia. " Just last week, Moore's campaign issued a news release accusing Brady of refusing to debate Moore, "a Real Democrat.
SPORTS
March 27, 2011 | By Ashley Fox, Inquirer Columnist
Who is this basketball goddess, this quiet woman who rarely loses, who rarely is denied? She is a scorer, a rebounder, a deadly shooter, a relentless worker, and a tirelessly driven player. She is the only player, male or female, to be named the Big East player of the year as a freshman, and she was so dominant so young that in 2008 Rutgers coach C. Vivian Stringer called her "the best player of this decade. " Three years later, she is a two-time NCAA champion, a two-time national player of the year, soon to be a four-time all-American.
SPORTS
May 14, 1993 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Rodney Moore was a teenager, he would walk into the gym slowly and timidly, staring through the cracks in the door to see if the tough guys were sparring. If they were gone, he would head inside, reasonably certain that his features would stay intact for at least one more day. "I was 17, and when I sparred with the pros, I'd get bloodied up, every time," the Philadelphia fighter, now 28, recalled. "Finally, I just started leaving if they were in the ring. Sometimes, my trainer would spot me and chase after me. " Armed with the skill that he never had as a kid, and the confidence to use it, Moore will fight Charles Murray for the International Boxing Federation version of the junior-welterweight title tomorrow afternoon at Trump Castle Casino Resort in Atlantic City.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Dorrances and the Elkinses and the Wanamakers wanted a new Cadillac, only one car salesman in the Philadelphia area would do - J. Hampton Moore, known to everybody as Hampy. Mr. Moore, 80, a legendary Cadillac salesman for 59 years, died Saturday at Abington Memorial Hospital. He lived in Meadowbrook. "Hampy was Cadillac personified," said Jack Lindsay, Mr. Moore's last employer, at Jack Lindsay Cadillac Inc. of Jenkintown. "In selling, the first thing you sell is yourself, and Hampy was a perfect gentleman," Lindsay said.
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NEWS
June 29, 2016 | Laurie Conrad
In a late-night Twitter Q&A, "Outlander" exec producer Ron D. Moore recently dropped tantalizing hints of what's to come for the hit show in Seasons 3 and 4, already greenlit by Starz. Each will encompass one book in the 8-book series by Diana Gabaldon, just as Season 2, which ends July 9, was based on the second book, "Dragonfly in Amber. " Among the fascinating Season 3 tidbits: We'll see more of Frank Randall. Moore has said he loves working with actor Tobias Menzies, who has had dual roles as Frank Randall, the modern-day husband of time-traveling Claire Fraser (Caitriona Balfe)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2016 | Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
Moore College of Art and Design's annual spring fashion show at the Barnes Foundation featured runway looks that dazzled with moody sophistication and wearable sparkle. The night's theme: "A Genre of Her Own: Mirroring Picasso. " Sophomores presented adorable tween looks. A special shout-out goes to Shannon Francis, who won the Heather Kauffman Critic Award for her collection of perfect little spring dresses inspired by wild gardens. Junior designers went contemporary and focused on athleisure.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A memorial service and poetry reading will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, June 12, to mark the death last month of Daniel Abdal-Hayy Moore, the Sufi poet, essayist, artist, and playwright. Mr. Abdal-Hayy Moore, 75, of Philadelphia, died Monday, April 18, after a lengthy battle with cancer. As the disease progressed, he wrote about it in a poem titled Fancy Dancer . In part, the poem reads: The cancer I've been dancing with (and cancer's a fancy dancer) has overcome its scruples and wants to marry me. I've rebuffed it once or twice now but its piteous face puckers and tears fills its eyes with the thought of losing me.   A protégé of Beat poets Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Allen Ginsberg, Mr. Abdal-Hayy Moore first came to light in San Francisco with publication of his poetic collections Dawn Visions (City Lights, 1964)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Maria Sweeney would rather have walked across the stage on her own, addressing her fellow Moore College of Art and Design graduates Sunday from behind the podium. Instead, the 22-year-old - who has a rare disease that causes her bones to break and her joints to freeze - took a wheelchair to the stage and spoke from a padded chair. Those who know her weren't surprised. "That's Maria," they say. She is continually challenged and tackles each setback with aplomb. Her determination and positive outlook have made her a favorite among her classmates and instructors.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
After graduating from Central High School in Philadelphia, William T. Moore enlisted in the Navy. For two years, he studied at a naval training center on the Navy Pier in Chicago, son Thomas said, while learning to become a carrier-based aircraft machinist. But then he was diagnosed with rheumatic fever, which a Mayo Clinic website states "can cause permanent damage to the heart. " A Navy physician "went to him and his mother, Edith," who had gone to be with her son, "told them he was doomed," and gave him an early discharge "to go home to perish.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Their first flirting came in cups of Wawa coffee they brought to each other, a warm gesture with a jolt of caffeine that prepared them for shared general surgery rounds at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Lauren, raised in Bel Air, Md., a recent graduate of the Temple School of Podiatric Medicine, was a podiatric-surgery resident at Crozer. Charlie, a native of Brick, N.J., and graduate of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - now Rutgers New Jersey Medical School - is a Temple University Hospital urology resident.
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
Hundreds gathered at a Germantown church Monday to say farewell to the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Acel Moore, celebrate his life, and honor his lasting impact on the Philadelphia region. Husband, father, brother, writer, editor, soldier, mentor, artist, inspiration, advocate for justice and newsroom diversity - he was that and more, friends said, an indomitable and, it seemed, permanent presence among those who knew and loved him. At Grace Baptist Church, tears flowed. And stories, too - about how Moore traversed boundaries of color and age to change people's lives.
NEWS
February 22, 2016 | By Clark DeLeon
I met Acel Moore the first day I arrived on the job as a summer intern at The Inquirer, straight out of North Philly and my senior year at Temple University in May of 1972. They were paying interns in those days, which was a good thing. At that time in life I couldn't afford to work full time for experience or prestige. I needed a paycheck. I was 22, with a wife and 7-month-old son, and we were living in a one-bedroom apartment in Manayunk. Top of the world, Ma! Metro editor Bob Greenberg introduced me to Acel and other reporters and editors as we walked around the newsroom that first day. Acel was an Army veteran who had started at the paper in 1962 as a "copy boy" - he hated that term - and worked his way up to police reporter in 1968.
NEWS
February 22, 2016 | William K. Marimow, Editor of the Inquirer
When I think of Acel Moore, the great Inquirer newsman who died Feb. 12, I remember a colleague whose influence permeated the pages of The Inquirer and the hearts and minds of our staff. In countless ways - some highly visible and not to be forgotten, like his 1976 series on violence by guards at the Farview State Mental Hospital; others barely recalled but so permanently important that a talented Daily News editor will never forget the call he placed to get her an internship in 1987 when she was a shy student at Cabrini College - Acel profoundly shaped the issues that The Inquirer covered and the staff we hired to cover them.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Jack Tomczuk, Staff Writer
At one of the city's newest schools Friday, one dedicated to primarily serving African American and Latino children from low-income families, students learned of long-ago efforts to integrate one of the area's oldest, Girard College. The students at Cristo Rey Philadelphia High School learned of that episode in the city's racial troubled history by watching a documentary on the efforts of civil rights leader Cecil B. Moore and dozens of young people in 1965 to force the integration of the then-all-white male boarding school.
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