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Moral Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Gov. Ridge regrets it, but he has to confess there are some parts of Pope John Paul II's encyclical on abortion and the death penalty he can't agree with. Ridge, a Catholic, believes women have a right to choose abortion, and since he took office Jan. 17, he has signed five death warrants. The courts have blocked two and three are pending. The encyclical represents the Catholic Church's broadest and most forceful condemnation of abortion and hardens the church's stance against capital punishment.
NEWS
September 6, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
FOR 10 WEEKS, Kim Davis has refused to issue marriage licenses to gay couples in Rowan County, Ky., where she's the elected clerk, because "God's moral law" won't allow her to do so. Yet God's moral law has somehow allowed Davis to marry four times. That's how the Lord rolls in the Church of Kim. I was glad when Davis was finally jailed Thursday on contempt charges. She can stay there until her fifth wedding, for all I care. Still, her actions got me wondering last week if I, too, would let power go to my head if I were a public servant, able to pick and choose who to mess with.
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | By Michael J. McMonagle
Gunshots on our school yards should sound an alarm. First, it should ring to protect the innocent. Then, it should ring for a nation that has turned its back on the moral law it once cherished - the law unrecognized by many young people who have not learned it from their elders. When a culture begins to unravel, its youngest members become the most disturbed. Consider just some of the unspeakable crimes committed around our nation by our youth. In November 1996, a teenage girl delivers a child in a Delaware motel.
NEWS
March 19, 2002 | By Crispin Sartwell
Recently, my wife and I discovered that one of our closet doors was broken. After a bit of back and forth, it emerged that our older son had broken it when he was roughhousing with his brother. He hadn't told us, he said, because he was afraid of getting in trouble. I thought of that when I saw this recent Associated Press story about an incident last year: "FT. WORTH, Texas - A nurse's aide hit a homeless man with her car, drove home with him stuck head-first in her broken windshield, and ignored his cries for help as he bled to death in her garage over the next two or three days, police say. " One of the most disturbing features of the story is that the nurse's aide, Chante Mallard, allegedly told police she periodically went into the garage to apologize to the man for hitting him and leaving him to die in her windshield.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The words, about 7,000 in all, were scribbled in the margins of newspapers and on other scrap paper. They did not show the soaring rhetoric he would use in a famous speech in Washington just months later. But some say the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter From Birmingham Jail" – a sharp, at times line-by-line rebuke of arguments white clergymen made denouncing King's tactic of nonviolent protest – marked a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement, swaying clergymen to become more and more involved.
NEWS
August 12, 2010
Misguided support of Prop 8 ruling In your editorial supporting the federal court decision voiding California Proposition 8 ("Equal under the law," Friday), you adopted the reasoning of the court: that since marriage is of fundamental importance, and since consensual homosexual activity cannot be banned, it follows that banning same-sex marriage violates the constitutional right to equal protection under the law. It is the legal equivalent of a non sequitur, as though an analysis of various shades of gray must lead to the inevitable conclusion that darkness itself is light.
NEWS
December 27, 1999 | By Cal Thomas
When Roe v. Wade was decided by a 7-2 vote in 1973, U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist declared the unconstitutional assault on the unborn an exercise in "raw judicial power. " That corrupt judicial seed found its way into last week's Vermont Supreme Court ruling that homosexuals have a right to the same presumptions and benefits as heterosexual married couples. As Robert Bork noted in the Wall Street Journal, neither the Vermont case nor several other recent state court cases, prohibiting school vouchers and the restriction of New York City's pornography trade, have "any support in the constitutions they invoke.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
I seldom touch on the subject of religion. But a little more than two weeks ago, the Vatican's neglected Commission on Justice, released a comprehensive catechism, "The Church and Racism," which was surprisingly candid in its concern over worldwide bigotry. Predictably, there has been little public or religious reaction to the Vatican commission's catechism. Perhaps the survey put a lot of normally insulated people on the spot. Coaxing Catholics and others to confront racism must have left a lot of religious followers with more than a small measure of discomfort.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | BY BILLY GRAHAM
Regardless of the outcome of the present investigations into President Clinton's alleged misconduct, the controversy has raised one question that must not go unanswered: Should those in positions of leadership be held to a higher standard of moral and ethical conduct than ordinary citizens? Those of us who affirm historic Judeo-Christian moral values - based on God's will, as revealed in the Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount - assert that wrong is always wrong, no matter who commits it. The Bible teaches that sin is the breaking of God's moral law. It always has repercussions - "Be sure your sin will find you out" (Numbers 32:23)
NEWS
November 5, 1997
Church's message has been consistently taught The article written by Joe Patrick Bean concerning the National Conference of Bishops' "Always Our Children: A Pastoral Message to Parents of Homosexual Children and Suggestions for Pastoral Ministers" initially did a good job of presenting the bishops' message of love and compassion (Inquirer, Oct. 23). The first half of the article was accurate in saying that "the homosexual orientation cannot be considered sinful" and that Catholic parents are urged "do everything possible to continue demonstrating love for your child.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 6, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
FOR 10 WEEKS, Kim Davis has refused to issue marriage licenses to gay couples in Rowan County, Ky., where she's the elected clerk, because "God's moral law" won't allow her to do so. Yet God's moral law has somehow allowed Davis to marry four times. That's how the Lord rolls in the Church of Kim. I was glad when Davis was finally jailed Thursday on contempt charges. She can stay there until her fifth wedding, for all I care. Still, her actions got me wondering last week if I, too, would let power go to my head if I were a public servant, able to pick and choose who to mess with.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The words, about 7,000 in all, were scribbled in the margins of newspapers and on other scrap paper. They did not show the soaring rhetoric he would use in a famous speech in Washington just months later. But some say the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter From Birmingham Jail" – a sharp, at times line-by-line rebuke of arguments white clergymen made denouncing King's tactic of nonviolent protest – marked a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement, swaying clergymen to become more and more involved.
NEWS
August 12, 2010
Misguided support of Prop 8 ruling In your editorial supporting the federal court decision voiding California Proposition 8 ("Equal under the law," Friday), you adopted the reasoning of the court: that since marriage is of fundamental importance, and since consensual homosexual activity cannot be banned, it follows that banning same-sex marriage violates the constitutional right to equal protection under the law. It is the legal equivalent of a non sequitur, as though an analysis of various shades of gray must lead to the inevitable conclusion that darkness itself is light.
NEWS
March 19, 2002 | By Crispin Sartwell
Recently, my wife and I discovered that one of our closet doors was broken. After a bit of back and forth, it emerged that our older son had broken it when he was roughhousing with his brother. He hadn't told us, he said, because he was afraid of getting in trouble. I thought of that when I saw this recent Associated Press story about an incident last year: "FT. WORTH, Texas - A nurse's aide hit a homeless man with her car, drove home with him stuck head-first in her broken windshield, and ignored his cries for help as he bled to death in her garage over the next two or three days, police say. " One of the most disturbing features of the story is that the nurse's aide, Chante Mallard, allegedly told police she periodically went into the garage to apologize to the man for hitting him and leaving him to die in her windshield.
NEWS
February 24, 2002
Importance of marriage in raising children Jane Eisner correctly calls the decoupling of marriage and child rearing the "most significant social issue" facing our nation ("Why it takes a marriage to raise a family," Feb. 17). Besides taking steps to secure our own relationships, we can contribute to restoring hope in several ways. We can support President Bush's efforts to encourage marriage in low-income areas. We can lobby for tax laws and homeownership incentives that reward marriage.
NEWS
December 27, 1999 | By Cal Thomas
When Roe v. Wade was decided by a 7-2 vote in 1973, U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist declared the unconstitutional assault on the unborn an exercise in "raw judicial power. " That corrupt judicial seed found its way into last week's Vermont Supreme Court ruling that homosexuals have a right to the same presumptions and benefits as heterosexual married couples. As Robert Bork noted in the Wall Street Journal, neither the Vermont case nor several other recent state court cases, prohibiting school vouchers and the restriction of New York City's pornography trade, have "any support in the constitutions they invoke.
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | By Michael J. McMonagle
Gunshots on our school yards should sound an alarm. First, it should ring to protect the innocent. Then, it should ring for a nation that has turned its back on the moral law it once cherished - the law unrecognized by many young people who have not learned it from their elders. When a culture begins to unravel, its youngest members become the most disturbed. Consider just some of the unspeakable crimes committed around our nation by our youth. In November 1996, a teenage girl delivers a child in a Delaware motel.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | BY BILLY GRAHAM
Regardless of the outcome of the present investigations into President Clinton's alleged misconduct, the controversy has raised one question that must not go unanswered: Should those in positions of leadership be held to a higher standard of moral and ethical conduct than ordinary citizens? Those of us who affirm historic Judeo-Christian moral values - based on God's will, as revealed in the Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount - assert that wrong is always wrong, no matter who commits it. The Bible teaches that sin is the breaking of God's moral law. It always has repercussions - "Be sure your sin will find you out" (Numbers 32:23)
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Gov. Ridge regrets it, but he has to confess there are some parts of Pope John Paul II's encyclical on abortion and the death penalty he can't agree with. Ridge, a Catholic, believes women have a right to choose abortion, and since he took office Jan. 17, he has signed five death warrants. The courts have blocked two and three are pending. The encyclical represents the Catholic Church's broadest and most forceful condemnation of abortion and hardens the church's stance against capital punishment.
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