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Moral Support

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NEWS
December 12, 2008
WITH BUDGET CUTS slashing away in every profession and industry, I saw the recent announcement that both the Daily News and the Inquirer will face more layoffs. Newspapers are the criers that bring both the local scene and the world to our eyes and minds. Reading a newspaper has been part of the American way of life for many years. You can help both the Daily News and the Inquirer by purchasing both daily. This not only helps in saving jobs, but will bring you even closer to what's going on locally and in the world around us. Frank Conforti, Philadelphia
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maryanne knew it was time to get tough with her daughter. Lisa, who is only 13, was using drugs, hanging out late with boys, flunking school, and driving her mother to tears. But now the time for tears is over, Maryanne told the group of six serious- looking middle-aged men and women at a small gathering in Upper Merion. It's time for action, time to sign a contract with her youngest daughter. Two of the other women around the table nodded, and asked when would be a good time to catch Lisa at home.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AKIRA SUWA
As Rea Newhall, 69, of Westampton, practices the bagpipes, he gets moral support from Mike St. Marie, 8, of Levittown, Pa., at the third annual Irish- American Festival, held at Penn's Landing.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | For The Inquirer / JIM ROESE
On his walk through Chester, Danny Garcia (center) receives a police escort from Officer Alan Davis and moral support from Councilwoman Patricia West and Mayor Aaron Wilson (second from right). Passing Chester High School yesterday, the group was also joined by varsity football players. Garcia has walked for more than 2,000 miles in the United States to raise awareness of, and money for, children's issues and charities. He walks 40 to 50 miles a day.
NEWS
August 8, 2002
RE THE LETTER "Jacko Wacko on Race Charge" by D. Williams. Williams claims that "Invincible" is a "poor-selling dud" and insinuates that is the reason Jackson is making claims of racism against the music industry. "Invincible" was released in October 2001, yet Billboard Magazine listed the album as No. 11 in the top 20 best-selling albums of 2001, with sales of 5.4 million. It's quite an accomplishment to be listed on the top 20 best-sellers list with only two months of sales. I'd hardly call that a dud. To date, the sales of the album are estimated at 10 million and that is without promotion from Sony.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
A study of the potential to raise private money to preserve open space in Lower Merion has recommended launching a $15 million fund-raising campaign after finding encouraging signs for financial, political and moral support. The fund-raising drive could start in November, the report said. It would target key trusts, foundations and individuals capable of making $500,000 donations and then build on smaller contributions to the Lower Merion Preservation Trust, an independent body that would control the fund.
NEWS
September 6, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Christina Sorgentoni, 9, whose battle against a malignant brain tumor caused friends, relatives and her community to rally around and provide financial and moral support, died Tuesday at her home in the Woodcrest section of Cherry Hill. Christina was diagnosed with the tumor in August 1995. In January, after she underwent surgery, radiation and chemotherapy at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, her parents were told she had only four to six weeks to live. It led her family to seek an alternative treatment, both controversial and expensive, in Houston, Texas.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Rita Giordano
"I want to say, ‘Thank you for your service,'?" said Marissa Colbeck, 14. "?‘What you do is brave, and I wouldn't be all right without you, so thanks for taking care of us.'?" Said fellow eighth-grader Kevin Calhoun: "It's the least we can do. " What they did was pretty impressive. Right in time for Memorial Day, "Hearts for Heroes" was the name given to the effort organized by Patty Watson, a patriotic volunteer, mother and former nurse from near Buffalo, N.Y., who has a New Jersey connection.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By Holly Ramer, Associated Press
CONCORD, N.H. - For the aspiring cooks and crafters who frequent Pinterest.com, "pinning" something is one thing. "Nailing" it is another. By letting users create "virtual pinboards," Pinterest has become a popular way to keep track of home decor ideas, recipes, and craft projects spread across the Internet. But those who go beyond collecting pretty pictures and actually attempt to re-create the crafts often discover it's harder than it looks. Such failures are featured to humorous effect on at least two sites, including Pintester.com and CraftFail.com.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Rita Giordano
"I want to say, ‘Thank you for your service,'?" said Marissa Colbeck, 14. "?‘What you do is brave, and I wouldn't be all right without you, so thanks for taking care of us.'?" Said fellow eighth-grader Kevin Calhoun: "It's the least we can do. " What they did was pretty impressive. Right in time for Memorial Day, "Hearts for Heroes" was the name given to the effort organized by Patty Watson, a patriotic volunteer, mother and former nurse from near Buffalo, N.Y., who has a New Jersey connection.
NEWS
December 12, 2008
WITH BUDGET CUTS slashing away in every profession and industry, I saw the recent announcement that both the Daily News and the Inquirer will face more layoffs. Newspapers are the criers that bring both the local scene and the world to our eyes and minds. Reading a newspaper has been part of the American way of life for many years. You can help both the Daily News and the Inquirer by purchasing both daily. This not only helps in saving jobs, but will bring you even closer to what's going on locally and in the world around us. Frank Conforti, Philadelphia
NEWS
November 4, 2004 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For weeks, David Hingsburger, a Canadian sex therapist, coached a young, mentally retarded man in how to tell his intimidating mother that he was ready to have a girlfriend and all that entails. Hingsburger made sure the young man could tell her all about the facts of life. But when he finally faced his mother, with Hingsburger there for moral support, all their rehearsals flew out the window. "Mom, do you know I love you?" the young man asked. "Of course," she said, off balance.
NEWS
June 18, 2004 | By Phil Canville
On Sunday we celebrate a day that honors our fathers as the pillars of our lives. They gave us love, patience, understanding, support, guidance - all the things we needed to grow up to become productive citizens. For me, though, the title of father has far less importance than that of dad. My parents divorced when I was 5, and I spent the next 11 years trying to get my father to accept me as his son - an acceptance that at best was only conditional. Over the years, as his role diminished, I came to realize that the foundation of the life I now enjoy came from the dads who became for me what my father should have been.
NEWS
August 8, 2002
RE THE LETTER "Jacko Wacko on Race Charge" by D. Williams. Williams claims that "Invincible" is a "poor-selling dud" and insinuates that is the reason Jackson is making claims of racism against the music industry. "Invincible" was released in October 2001, yet Billboard Magazine listed the album as No. 11 in the top 20 best-selling albums of 2001, with sales of 5.4 million. It's quite an accomplishment to be listed on the top 20 best-sellers list with only two months of sales. I'd hardly call that a dud. To date, the sales of the album are estimated at 10 million and that is without promotion from Sony.
SPORTS
April 1, 2002 | By Ashley McGeachy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the 76ers, shorthanded and facing a motivated opponent on a four-game winning streak, the third quarter was as horrendous as it gets. So much for timing. After building a 43-32 halftime lead over the surging Toronto Raptors yesterday, the Sixers managed a season-low nine points in the third period. Everything went wrong. Players neglected to take open shots, and the team committed six turnovers. So instead of leading by 11, the Sixers trailed by one, at 53-52, heading into the fourth quarter at the First Union Center.
SPORTS
October 4, 2001 | By Josh Egerman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lisa Steinhauer and Jackie Dunn competed on the Rancocas Valley swim team in the winter and track team in the spring the last two years. But they parted ways in the fall. Steinhauer went to the cross-country team, where she was easily Rancocas Valley's top runner. Dunn played for the soccer team, where she started her first two seasons. Dunn, though, made the change to cross-country for this, her junior season. Steinhauer, a senior, couldn't be happier. "It's a lot easier, now," Steinhauer said.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | By Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Three days after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Honey Brook native Mary Nafe went to New York City. There would be plenty of tired rescue workers, police and firefighters with sore shoulders, achy backs and tense muscles there, she thought. They would need some relief. So Nafe got in her car and drove to Manhattan. She was going to do her part by offering her services as a masseuse. Armed with strong, soothing hands and a desire to volunteer, Nafe gave about 60 massages to rescue workers as they dug through the rubble that once was the World Trade Center towers.
SPORTS
September 21, 2000 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The deep, calm voice on the other end of the phone line Monday sent a jolt of optimism through Michael Haynes. The voice belonged to Courtney Brown, the former all-American Penn State defensive end who was the No. 1 overall pick in the NFL draft last spring. Brown, now playing for the Cleveland Browns, was perhaps the greatest defensive player in Nittany Lions history. There was no embellishing when you called this guy a student-athlete without embarrassment. Nonetheless, Brown is well aware of the dreadful times Penn State is enduring, and he hadn't forgotten his protege - Haynes.
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