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Morality

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NEWS
June 3, 2004
IAND OTHERS have written in the past to decry the waste of space devoted to the nastiness Michelle Malkin calls "political commentary," but in her most recent column, she has descended to a new level. Ms. Malkin has now become the guardian of public morality with her national outing of young women working in Washington. Thank God Jessica Cutler worked for a Republican senator and not a "liberal" Democrat. Ms. Malkin attacked only the young lady, not those public servants, including one "appointed by Bush," who took advantage of her favors.
NEWS
November 2, 2007
IF Boy Scouts want to discriminate against gay people (and atheists), it's ultimately their decision. They just have to practice their questionable morality in a place not provided by taxpayers. Surely there must be a gay-hating, morally straight, Christian property-owner who'd be glad to offer the Scouts a building at below market value so they can continue their alleged "good work. " Michael McGonigle, Philadelphia
NEWS
January 5, 1986
Stanley Karnow (Op-ed Page, Dec. 25) has distorted the meaning of George Kennan's recent article in Foreign Affairs. Actually, he has completely reversed the thrust of Mr. Kennan's piece. In his famous article 40 years ago, Mr. Kennan argued that American foreign policy had been too legalistic and moralistic. In his current article, he denies that he wanted morality to be abandoned. He points out areas where our policy should be more in line with morality. Specifically, he condemns a policy of secret dirty tricks, saying that the success of our diplomacy has always depended on its inherent honesty.
NEWS
July 5, 2002
IN HIS LETTER to the editor, Mr. Syheed Ahmad Willis states that while it is true that the Prophet Muhammad had sex with a 9-year-old girl, he did it in an honorable way. I'm having a really difficult time trying to find anything "honorable" about a grown man having sex with a 9-year-old child. And why is it that the defenders of this pedophile's act all seem to have one state correctional address or another? Let me guess- you were framed. John Kirschner Claymont, Del.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The authors of a controversial report calling on Presbyterians to adopt a new morality allowing homosexuality and sex outside marriage presented their recommendations yesterday to representatives of a church that has been deeply troubled by the authors' work. Now the commissioners to the annual General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), meeting here this week and next, must decide what to do with the recommendations, which represent a dramatic break with centuries of Christian moral tradition.
NEWS
August 28, 1998 | BY TRISH MILNAMOW
TV news has drawn a line of morality in the sand that is laughable in its hypocrisy. The American public is inundated with sermons by pundits and commentators on "news" programs. The central themes are the alleged immorality of the president and the apathy of the American public. How is journalistic irresponsibility for a theme? The distaste for the discussion of sex acts is seen as moral apathy instead of a refusal to rush to judgment. The reality is closer to the fact that most Americans are aware that our TV news media and some print publications are hard-pressed to be arbiters of American morality.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1999 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Here we go again - another paranoid comedy about a decent, principled Jonah swallowed whole by the voracious leviathan of crass American society. By now, we know the dramatis personae: unscrupulous politicians, greedy publishers, scandal-mongering reporters, and, most cynically of all, an ignorant, gullible public. We know the narrative method, too: Grab a bludgeon and whack away. Jamie Pachico, a Chicago playwright whose The Return to Morality is on view at the Adrienne in an InterAct Theatre Company production, was inspired by an actual incident: a 1967 literary hoax in which a set of proposals spoofing right-wing ideology was taken, by some, as a genuine government document.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | By PHILIP BATTAGLIA
I hear the social engineers from the left: "You can't legislate morality. " In contradiction to this creed, members of ACT UP, an AIDS organization, toss condoms at an 80-year-old school board director, demanding prophylactics be distributed to students to fight the spread of AIDS. Claude Lewis, in his March 7 Inquirer column, urges the school board to adopt this seemingly pragmatic solution and cater to the sexual trends of today's teenagers. In the March 15 Letters section two writers support Lewis' article.
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Measure for Measure, Shakespeare deals with the issue of controlling public morality through law. The issue is with us still, as the debate over laws regulating abortion attest. Still, Shakespeare's infrequently produced work, which the Philadelphia Area Repertory Theater (PART) is presenting at the Mask and Wig Theater, is a puzzling piece for the contemporary theatergoer. One reason is the draconian terms in which the principal issue is framed: Claudio has gotten Juliet, whom he intends to marry, with child, and the penalty for fornication in the Vienna that Shakespeare imagines is death.
NEWS
December 1, 2010
THE Daily News advocates extending unemployment benefits for another three months at a cost of $12.5 billion. Not noted is that the benefits have already been extended umpteen times, currently to 96 weeks (from 26), at a cost somewhere around $300 billion. Why can't the unemployed work for their benefits? Plant trees or clean vacant lots to help the environment, provide day care or elder care so others can work, fix potholes. Why, after the cost of transportation, day care, taxes, uniforms, are the benefits more attractive than accepting a minimum-wage job?
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2016 | By Alan Zilberman, FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Kicks unfolds with relentless despair. Its characters are violent and cruel, seemingly without ambition or empathy. The title refers to a pair of Air Jordans, shoes that 15-year-old Brandon (Jahking Guillory) decides are his ticket to happiness. He is a small kid - his high school buddies Albert (Christopher Jordan Wallace) and Rico (Christopher Meyer) stand significantly taller - and salvation comes when he discovers a man selling stolen sneakers out of the back of his car. Brandon buys them, getting the respect he thinks he deserves, at least until Flaco (Kofi Siriboe)
NEWS
September 5, 2016
Marc Thiessen writes a weekly column for the Washington Post on foreign and domestic policy and is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute Dozens of notable Republicans have said they will not vote for Donald Trump, including at least six senators, two governors, the 2012 presidential nominee, and a group of 50 former national security officials who served Republican presidents from Richard Nixon to George W. Bush, among others. So where are the #NeverHillary Democrats?
NEWS
July 20, 2016
Four violent July days have pushed the country deeper into a state of what the French sociologist Émile Durkheim called anomie - turmoil born of a breakdown of societal standards. On July 5, Baton Rouge, La., police fatally shot Alton Sterling after tackling him in a convenience store parking lot where he was selling CDs. On July 6, a St. Anthony, Minn., police officer stopped Philando Castile for a busted taillight and ended up killing him in front of his girlfriend and her daughter.
NEWS
July 9, 2016
ISSUE | CHURCH Communion questionnaire So Philadelphia Archbishop Charles Chaput gets to decide for the disenfranchised Catholics of Philadelphia what Pope Francis clearly did not say in Amoris Laetitia ? The sheer arrogance and un-Christian attitude of Chaput continue to stun (" Chaput edict scorned, praised ," Thursday). One can only cling to the belief that Jesus never intended Communion be reserved for the few and the chaste. Funny, there were no questions posed about "state of grace" at the Last Supper.
NEWS
June 2, 2016
Unless you are a pacifist, you accept that evil acts - the destruction of other human lives - can be justified, even necessary, in pursuit of good and urgent ends. But unless you are amoral, you also acknowledge the human capacity for self-delusion and selfishness. People are quite capable of justifying the utterly unjustifiable by draping their immoral actions behind sweeping ethical claims. And if you are a responsible political leader, you must recognize both sides of this moral equation and still not allow yourself to be paralyzed.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
By James Waller Zalman Gradowski, a Jew from Luna in the district of Grodno, on the border of Lithuania and Poland (present-day Belarus), arrived in Auschwitz on the morning of Dec. 8, 1942. Upon arrival, his mother, wife, two sisters, brother-in-law, and father-in-law were taken immediately to the gas chambers. Gradowski, an able-bodied man, was assigned to the Sonderkommando squad, the prisoners who serviced the crematoria by pulling out the bodies, plundering the corpses, burning the remains, and disposing of the ashes.
NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
City Council candidate Manny Morales' get-out-the-vote operation in May violated the city's campaign finance law, according to a settlement agreement released Monday. Morales, a controversial candidate whose Facebook page was riddled with homophobic and racist postings, lost narrowly in the Seventh District primary to incumbent Councilwoman Maria Quiñones-Sánchez. Two political action committees backing Morales - the 7th Ward/Friends of Angel Cruz PAC and Latinos United for Political Empowerment (LUPE)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2016 | By Bill Chenevert, For The Inquirer
Jennifer Haley's The Nether is unsettling theater, not aimed at sending audiences into the night with light hearts. There's not much to feel good about in Haley's play. InterAct Theatre is a Philadelphia treasure, an adventurous and bold company that has delighted and informed in the past. But I'm afraid The Nether , even with artistic director Seth Rozin directing, disappoints. The Internet is the precursor to the Nether, we learn. Characters refer to the "highway" much as we used to talk about dialing into the World Wide Web. But in this dystopian near-future, the Nether is a collection of virtual-reality realms, and some humans are hooked as if it were heroin.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Paul Farmer, a renowned pioneer of global health care, brought his message about the importance of caring for the world's poor to the University of Pennsylvania this week. Farmer said academic medical centers like Penn can make a huge difference by bringing their model of combining research, training, and hands-on care to places where people lack even basic medical supplies. A Harvard Medical School professor, Farmer has used that approach successfully at the organization he helped found, Partners in Health.
SPORTS
March 12, 2016 | By Tom Reifsnyder, Staff Writer
When Mariana Bracetti Academy senior Edwin Morales was a freshman in high school, he had to watch his little brother come home with the only things he really wanted: medals. Morales finished his freshman year, his first season on a wrestling mat, with no medals and a 17-12 record as he failed to place at the District 12 tournament. "To be honest, seeing my brother bring medals home is what motivated me to do better," Morales said. "After winning my first medal sophomore year at sectionals, I always said to myself, 'I'm going to bring home more medals, and I'm going to win first place.' "Junior year came, and all the medals started rolling in because I committed myself to not only taking medals, but beating kids and working hard.
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