CollectionsMordecai Richler
IN THE NEWS

Mordecai Richler

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In 1974 - the year before he became an international star with the huge success of Jaws - Richard Dreyfuss played another kind of shark in The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz. A withering satire based on the work of Canadian novelist Mordecai Richler, Duddy Kravitz is a movie that makes greed disarming if not likable. Duddy (Dreyfuss) comes of age in Montreal's Jewish community in the '40s. He's the son of a downtrodden cab driver who takes a very literal view of his grandfather's advice on getting rich: Buy land.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Canadian author Mordecai Richler's screenplay for "The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz," based on his 1959 novel, was nominated for an Oscar in 1975. Richard Dreyfuss starred in the film as Duddy, a Montreal Jew who is a Canadian version of Sammy in "What Makes Sammy Run. " In town this week for previews of a new musical centering on Duddy, Richler visits Terry Gross on "Fresh Air" tonight at 7:30 on WHYY (FM/91), to tell us what he thinks of the play, which opened Tuesday at the Zellerbach Theater.
NEWS
September 28, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
This ambitious musical has within it a clear potential for commercial success, considerable avoirdupois to shed and a thorny ethical question. It is a songful, soulful, energetic, interesting, thought-provoking, good- looking, well-cast and deeply involving hunk of musical theater that, like its protagonist, positively overflows with chutzpah. It rather effectively mesmerized me for a goodly amount of its nearly three-hour length. Only a bitter aftertaste gave me pause. "Duddy Kravitz" is about a motherless young Jew from Montreal with a pimp for a father, a profligate for a brother and a rich uncle who is sending the brother through med school but treating Duddy like scum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
World premiere of "The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz," a new musical based on the novel by Mordecai Richler. Book by Austin Pendleton and Richler, music by Alan Menken, lyrics by David Spencer. Directed by Pendleton, choreography and musical numbers staged by D.J. Giagni, set design by Clark Dunham, lighting by Ken Billington, costumes by Ruth Morley, musical direction by Eric Stern. Presented by the American Music Theater Festival at the Zellerbach Theatre of the Annenberg Center, 3680 Walnut St., through Oct. 11. This ambitious musical has within it a clear potential for commercial success, considerable avoirdupois to shed and a thorny ethical question.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Though CNN's "Parker Spitzer" sets the modern standard for creepy man-woman chemistry, "Barney's Version" is a close second. The movie pairs U.K. dish Rosamund Pike with hairy gnome Paul Giamatti, who in "Barney's Version" scales Pike's Peak (he does a nude dive on top of her) only AFTER he jettisons a willing female entourage that includes Minnie Driver and Rachelle Lefevre. Is it his Axe body wash? We can rule out personality. The movie is adapted from a beloved Mordecai Richler novel, and shows the perils of separating an author's characters from his literary voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
This time last year, the roster of fall movies read like a Who's Who of Broadway. From Crimes of the Heart to Little Shop of Horrors, movies that originated on the Great White Way were being touted as an alternative to Hollywood's usual formula entertainments. Mordecai Richler, the celebrated Canadian novelist, is a man going in the other direction. His novel The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz was published in 1959. In 1974, this comic memoir of a Montreal heel became a highly regarded film directed by Ted Kotcheff and proved to be the breakthrough movie for Richard Dreyfuss.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
That rumpled grumpus Paul Giamatti seizes the title role   in Barney's Version , summoning irresistibility and irritability to create a character as endearing as he is galling. As he demonstrated in American Splendor and Sideways , Giamatti has a particular gift for finding eloquence in the unspeakable. Taken from the late Mordecai Richler's 1997 novel about a squirrely churl who inexplicably is catnip to women, the adaptation is a case of an unfilmable book with enough greatness in it to make a good movie.
NEWS
January 11, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Turning The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz into a Broadway musical "sounded like fun" to Mordecai Richler, who wrote the novel and the movie on which the musical was based. It did not work out that way. What happened was misery and death in Philadelphia. With wry humor, Richler gives an innocent's account of the show's tryout here last fall in the January issue of GQ magazine. The production was the centerpiece of the American Music Theater Festival's season last fall. Upon arriving in Philadelphia, Richler writes, he and his wife put up at the Barclay.
NEWS
September 29, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
That obnoxious kid, Duddy Kravitz, has turned up again. A little softer than we remember him, but still the selfish, pushy opportunist, wheeling and dealing, frantically on the go, a classic type. He grabbed our attention in Mordecai Richler's novel and held it in Richard Dreyfuss' dynamic performance in the remarkable film. Now they've tried to capture him in a Broadway-size musical, but he won't hold still long enough. He is in constant and fascinating motion, but he is far too busy to let anyone get a fix on him. In its world-premiere engagement at the Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theater, The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz is an overplotted, overlong and overwrought show that runs out of breath chasing its dodgy little hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1986 | By CHARLES LEE, Special to the Daily News
America's first book club pops the corks for its 60th anniversary April 17 at an awards dinner at the New York Public Library. The Book-of-the-Month Club began operations in April 1926 in a small New York City walk-up. Today, in addition to luxurious executive offices in Manhattan, the club occupies huge computerized facilities in Camp Hill. Its nearly 1,000 employees open tens of thousands of pieces of mail a day (including 23,000 checks) and ship more than 25,000 packages of books to members.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
That rumpled grumpus Paul Giamatti seizes the title role   in Barney's Version , summoning irresistibility and irritability to create a character as endearing as he is galling. As he demonstrated in American Splendor and Sideways , Giamatti has a particular gift for finding eloquence in the unspeakable. Taken from the late Mordecai Richler's 1997 novel about a squirrely churl who inexplicably is catnip to women, the adaptation is a case of an unfilmable book with enough greatness in it to make a good movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Though CNN's "Parker Spitzer" sets the modern standard for creepy man-woman chemistry, "Barney's Version" is a close second. The movie pairs U.K. dish Rosamund Pike with hairy gnome Paul Giamatti, who in "Barney's Version" scales Pike's Peak (he does a nude dive on top of her) only AFTER he jettisons a willing female entourage that includes Minnie Driver and Rachelle Lefevre. Is it his Axe body wash? We can rule out personality. The movie is adapted from a beloved Mordecai Richler novel, and shows the perils of separating an author's characters from his literary voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In 1974 - the year before he became an international star with the huge success of Jaws - Richard Dreyfuss played another kind of shark in The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz. A withering satire based on the work of Canadian novelist Mordecai Richler, Duddy Kravitz is a movie that makes greed disarming if not likable. Duddy (Dreyfuss) comes of age in Montreal's Jewish community in the '40s. He's the son of a downtrodden cab driver who takes a very literal view of his grandfather's advice on getting rich: Buy land.
NEWS
January 11, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Turning The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz into a Broadway musical "sounded like fun" to Mordecai Richler, who wrote the novel and the movie on which the musical was based. It did not work out that way. What happened was misery and death in Philadelphia. With wry humor, Richler gives an innocent's account of the show's tryout here last fall in the January issue of GQ magazine. The production was the centerpiece of the American Music Theater Festival's season last fall. Upon arriving in Philadelphia, Richler writes, he and his wife put up at the Barclay.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
This time last year, the roster of fall movies read like a Who's Who of Broadway. From Crimes of the Heart to Little Shop of Horrors, movies that originated on the Great White Way were being touted as an alternative to Hollywood's usual formula entertainments. Mordecai Richler, the celebrated Canadian novelist, is a man going in the other direction. His novel The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz was published in 1959. In 1974, this comic memoir of a Montreal heel became a highly regarded film directed by Ted Kotcheff and proved to be the breakthrough movie for Richard Dreyfuss.
NEWS
September 29, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
That obnoxious kid, Duddy Kravitz, has turned up again. A little softer than we remember him, but still the selfish, pushy opportunist, wheeling and dealing, frantically on the go, a classic type. He grabbed our attention in Mordecai Richler's novel and held it in Richard Dreyfuss' dynamic performance in the remarkable film. Now they've tried to capture him in a Broadway-size musical, but he won't hold still long enough. He is in constant and fascinating motion, but he is far too busy to let anyone get a fix on him. In its world-premiere engagement at the Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theater, The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz is an overplotted, overlong and overwrought show that runs out of breath chasing its dodgy little hero.
NEWS
September 28, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
This ambitious musical has within it a clear potential for commercial success, considerable avoirdupois to shed and a thorny ethical question. It is a songful, soulful, energetic, interesting, thought-provoking, good- looking, well-cast and deeply involving hunk of musical theater that, like its protagonist, positively overflows with chutzpah. It rather effectively mesmerized me for a goodly amount of its nearly three-hour length. Only a bitter aftertaste gave me pause. "Duddy Kravitz" is about a motherless young Jew from Montreal with a pimp for a father, a profligate for a brother and a rich uncle who is sending the brother through med school but treating Duddy like scum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
World premiere of "The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz," a new musical based on the novel by Mordecai Richler. Book by Austin Pendleton and Richler, music by Alan Menken, lyrics by David Spencer. Directed by Pendleton, choreography and musical numbers staged by D.J. Giagni, set design by Clark Dunham, lighting by Ken Billington, costumes by Ruth Morley, musical direction by Eric Stern. Presented by the American Music Theater Festival at the Zellerbach Theatre of the Annenberg Center, 3680 Walnut St., through Oct. 11. This ambitious musical has within it a clear potential for commercial success, considerable avoirdupois to shed and a thorny ethical question.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Canadian author Mordecai Richler's screenplay for "The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz," based on his 1959 novel, was nominated for an Oscar in 1975. Richard Dreyfuss starred in the film as Duddy, a Montreal Jew who is a Canadian version of Sammy in "What Makes Sammy Run. " In town this week for previews of a new musical centering on Duddy, Richler visits Terry Gross on "Fresh Air" tonight at 7:30 on WHYY (FM/91), to tell us what he thinks of the play, which opened Tuesday at the Zellerbach Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
If there were a list of literary protagonists who are good people, Duddy Kravitz certainly would not be on it. The title character of Mordecai Richler's novel, The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, is dishonest, greedy, pushy, cruel and manipulative. So what's he doing as the subject of a musical? "I guess I didn't find him that way," said Austin Pendleton, director and co-writer of the musical The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, which begins previews Tuesday at the Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theater under the auspices of the American Music Theater Festival.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|