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Morning After Pill

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NEWS
July 22, 1996 | By Jill Page
As a child I said, "It's not fair!" As an adult I still say that, but I try to remember to act my age. Therefore, I say "It's not right. " When it comes to the FDA advisory panel's recent unanimous vote that the use of some oral contraceptives as "morning-after pills" is safe and effective, I must say, "It's not right!" First and foremost is the fact that it has been reported in the media that morning-after pills prevent pregnancy. The morning-after pill is post-coital use of an increased dosage of certain birth control pills.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - The federal government yesterday told a judge it will reverse course and take steps to comply with his order to allow girls of any age to buy emergency contraception without prescriptions. The Department of Justice, in the latest development in a complex back-and-forth over access to the morning-after pill, notified U.S. District Judge Edward Korman that it will submit a plan for compliance. If he approves it, the department will drop its appeal of his April ruling. According to the department's letter to the judge, the Food and Drug Administration has told the maker of the pills to submit a new drug application with proposed labeling that would permit it to be sold "without a prescription and without age or point-of-sale prescriptions.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
Students at Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania can get the "morning-after" pill by sliding $25 into a vending machine, an idea that has drawn the attention of federal regulators and raised questions about how accessible emergency contraception should be. The student health center at Shippensburg, a public institution of 8,300 students tucked between mountain ridges in the Cumberland Valley, provides the Plan B One Step emergency contraceptive in...
NEWS
June 1, 1994 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every year, legions of women who get pregnant when they don't intend to wish they'd had an emergency pill to take right after sex to prevent pregnancy - or the need for an abortion. What they don't realize is that the pill exists. It's safe, legal and it could potentially cut in half the number of abortions and unwanted pregnancies that occur each year in this country. It's a prescription drug that's been available for more than 15 years and is now sitting in millions of medicine cabinets.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Colleen Long, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Obama administration on Monday filed a last-minute appeal to delay the sale of the morning-after contraceptive pill to girls of any age without a prescription. The legal paperwork asked the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, in Manhattan, to postpone a federal judge's ruling that eliminated age limits on the pill, while the government appeals that overall decision. U.S. District Judge Edward Korman has said that politics was behind efforts by Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius to block the unrestricted sale of the Plan B One-Step morning-after pill and its generic competitors.
NEWS
March 10, 2006 | By Tony Pugh INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Internal documents made public yesterday have raised questions about the federal government's continued refusal to allow over-the-counter sales of the emergency contraceptive known as Plan B. The documents, obtained by Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D., Calif.), show that in February 2004, policymakers at the Food and Drug Administration found no problem in allowing the so-called morning-after pill to be sold without a prescription to females of all ages. Yet 18 months later, then-FDA Commissioner Lester Crawford cited concerns about selling the drug to younger teens as a major reason for blocking the move.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge in Brooklyn ruled Friday that emergency contraception must be available over the counter without restriction for women of all ages, giving the product the same retail status as cough drops and condoms. U.S. District Judge Edward Korman's ruling caps a battle that began a dozen years ago when women's health activists first petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to make the so-called morning-after pill readily available without a prescription. As he did in 2009, Korman on Friday assailed the FDA for delaying and defying the petition and subsequent lawsuit.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, many college student-health services across the country have dispensed without fanfare a simple and safe solution to an unwanted pregnancy: the morning-after pill. But at tranquil Lehigh University, the practice has recently caused a stir. Is the pill a form of abortion? Should a university offer the pill to its students? Is it safe? For a number of years, Lehigh, along with many other schools, has quietly dispensed at no charge the morning-after pill Ovral, said Stanley E. Yellin, medical director at Lehigh's Student Health Center.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 27, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning-after pill debate began anew this week when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration quietly said that Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. would have three years of exclusive rights to sell Plan B One-Step oral contraceptives to anyone of any age as an over-the-counter product. Teva is based in Israel, but its Americas headquarters is in North Wales, Montgomery County. For more than a decade, women's health groups have pushed the FDA and two presidential administrations to make such contraceptives available to women of all ages without a prescription.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't rush to the drugstore quite yet if you are a female under 17, need emergency contraception, and have no prescription. "I don't expect to see it at neighborhood pharmacies instantly," said Susannah Baruch of the Reproductive Health Technologies Project, which has been part of the decadelong legal fight to make such approved medicine available to females of any age, without a prescription, at the lowest possible cost. While Baruch said Tuesday it was "fantastic" that the Obama administration indicated Monday night it would tentatively comply with parts of federal Judge Edward B. Korman's recent orders regarding access, Baruch and colleagues did not like important details in a Justice Department letter that spelled out the government's plan.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Tom Hays, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The federal government on Monday told a judge it will reverse course and take steps to comply with his order to allow girls of any age to buy emergency contraception without prescriptions. The Department of Justice, in the latest development in a complex back-and-forth over access to the morning-after pill, notified U.S. District Judge Edward Korman it will submit a plan for compliance. If he approves it, the department will drop its appeal of his April ruling. "Once the court confirms that the government's understanding is correct, the government intends to file with the Circuit Court notice that it is voluntarily withdrawing its appeal in this matter," the department said in a letter to the judge.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - The federal government yesterday told a judge it will reverse course and take steps to comply with his order to allow girls of any age to buy emergency contraception without prescriptions. The Department of Justice, in the latest development in a complex back-and-forth over access to the morning-after pill, notified U.S. District Judge Edward Korman that it will submit a plan for compliance. If he approves it, the department will drop its appeal of his April ruling. According to the department's letter to the judge, the Food and Drug Administration has told the maker of the pills to submit a new drug application with proposed labeling that would permit it to be sold "without a prescription and without age or point-of-sale prescriptions.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Larry Neumeister and Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Generic versions of emergency contraception can be sold without a prescription or age restrictions while the federal government appeals a judge's ruling allowing the sales, an appeals court said Wednesday. The brief order issued by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan permitted two-pill versions of emergency contraception to immediately be sold without restrictions, but the court refused to allow unrestricted sales of Plan B One-Step until it decides the merits of the government's appeal.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Colleen Long, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Obama administration on Monday filed a last-minute appeal to delay the sale of the morning-after contraceptive pill to girls of any age without a prescription. The legal paperwork asked the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, in Manhattan, to postpone a federal judge's ruling that eliminated age limits on the pill, while the government appeals that overall decision. U.S. District Judge Edward Korman has said that politics was behind efforts by Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius to block the unrestricted sale of the Plan B One-Step morning-after pill and its generic competitors.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
AFTER THE JURY decided the fate of Kermit "House of Horrors" Gosnell yesterday, my editor asked me, "So what do you think, now that Gosnell has been found guilty?" He inquired as though my opinion mattered, which it's supposed to when you write an opinion column, right? But the truth is, I feel almost too overwhelmed by the case to render an opinion about Gosnell beyond the most obvious one: That he's a monster who became rich by preying on the poor and desperate, and that I wish him years of misery behind bars until a death sentence ends his waste of a life.
NEWS
April 7, 2013
Suspect kills Miss. detective, self in headquarters A murder suspect in Jackson, Miss., wrestled a gun away from the detective interrogating him at police headquarters, then fatally shot the officer before killing himself, authorities said Friday. Authorities said Jeremy Powell, 23, seized the gun from Jackson Police detective Eric Smith in a third-floor interrogation room while he was being questioned about a stabbing death earlier this week. Smith, 40, had been with the agency nearly 20 years, was physically fit and was praised for his work leading numerous high-profile murder investigations, officials said.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge in Brooklyn ruled Friday that emergency contraception must be available over the counter without restriction for women of all ages, giving the product the same retail status as cough drops and condoms. U.S. District Judge Edward Korman's ruling caps a battle that began a dozen years ago when women's health activists first petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to make the so-called morning-after pill readily available without a prescription. As he did in 2009, Korman on Friday assailed the FDA for delaying and defying the petition and subsequent lawsuit.
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