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Morning Sickness

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NEWS
January 27, 1987 | By Beth Gillin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 27 years, doctors routinely prescribed it to women who complained that pregnancy was making them sick. An estimated 33 million women around the world took Bendectin - a mixture of a B vitamin and an antihistamine called doxylamine - before it was withdrawn from the market in 1983. Last week, a Philadelphia jury found that by manufacturing this commonly used drug, Merrell Dow Pharmaceutical Co. Inc. of Cincinnati had acted not only negligently but with reckless disregard of the consequences to the unborn children of the women who took it. The jury then punished the company by ordering it to pay $1 million in damages - the first punitive award in the nation in a Bendectin case - to a Huntingdon Valley boy born with club feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
CALM DOWN, folks. Just calm down. Temporary Tattle is about to re-report a royal announcement, and she knows how touchy some readers are about the monarchy. So, it is with the utmost respect to the crown (God Save the Queen!) that I type news you knew already: Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (please note the perfect usage of title) have announced they're expecting a second child. The Duchess, whose first name I dare not shorten, lest I offend, is believed to be fewer than three months along.
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Thirty-five years ago, thousands of babies around the world were born with flipper-like feet or with no arms or legs because their mothers took thalidomide, a drug for morning sickness. Yesterday, a government panel recommended that the drug, after decades of being banned, be approved with tight restrictions. The contentious and emotional recommendation by a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel is designed for very narrow use, by about 200 patients with leprosy complications.
LIVING
October 30, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the legions of American women who put up with months of nausea and vomiting rather than risk taking medication during pregnancy, there is good news. A Canadian company plans to market Diclectin, the only drug that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has declared to be safe and effective for "morning sickness" - the misnamed misery that afflicts up to 80 percent of pregnant women. Here's the kicker: The drug - made of a vitamin and an antihistamine - was approved 44 years ago. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals withdrew its American brand in 1983 because of lawsuits blaming the product for birth defects.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
A SICK THEORY If it's any consolation to you expectant mothers, a new book says that morning sickness is the body's way of protecting the embryo from toxic food. In The Adapted Mind, University of California biologist Margie Profet says morning sickness deters women from eating foods that might cause birth defects or aborted pregnancies. When women experience little or no nausea and can eat more freely, miscarriage is three times as likely to occur, according to studies cited by Profet.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Ladies' Home Journal magazine and Inquirer wire services
MORNING SICKNESS. Fifty to 80 percent of all pregnant women are affected by morning sickness. And researchers from Atlanta's Emory University say the name is misleading - some women have nausea in the evening, or morning and evening, and sometimes all day. Based on their study, the researchers advise pregnant women to get plenty of rest. Fifty-nine percent of those surveyed said fatigue caused their nausea. MARRIAGE VOWS. Eighty-eight percent of the married women polled by Ladies' Home Journal said they would walk down the aisle again with the same man. The poll of 608 women found that only 7 percent would not remarry their mates.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
TESTING HIS LOVE For the woman whose mate has never been mistaken for George Washington, Cosmopolitan offers this four-point Valentine's Day test to determine whether the diamond is real or a cubic zirconia (CZ) counterfeit. 1. CZ doesn't have the sharp edges of a diamond. 2. A line drawn on a sheet of paper is visible through CZ, but not through a diamond. 3. CZ will be transparent if dropped in water; a diamond will remain visible. 4. CZ will splinter if hit hard; a diamond is virtually indestructible.
NEWS
November 27, 1991 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
The reason women most often cite for not getting early prenatal care is that they didn't know they were pregnant. Suspect you are pregnant if: 1. You miss a menstrual period or have a period that is not normal. Some women will spot even after they become pregnant, but most who do notice that it's not a perfectly normal menstrual period. If you have had sexual intercourse during the month and don't have a perfectly normal cycle, suspect pregnancy. 2. Your breasts are swollen and your nipples are uncomfortable for more than two weeks (in other words, longer han they would normally be when you are pre-menstrual)
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | By JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writer
Cherylle Staley took a maternity leave from her job early this month. Her fellow employees gave her a baby shower. She got a lot of nice gifts. Her roommate saw her in a nightgown with a swollen belly. She suffered morning sickness. Her boyfriend believed he felt a fetus move. And last Saturday, Staley showed her friends a baby that she said was hers. But Staley had never been pregnant. The baby was not hers. Police say she stole 4-month-old LaShae Cherry from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia on Saturday because she wanted to give her boyfriend a baby and had not been able to become pregnant.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harriet Schiffer left the Philadelphia area 16 years ago for San Francisco. There she became a performer, and last night she returned to perform for the first time in her home town, bringing her one-woman show, Morning Sickness or Woodsman, Spare That Tree, to the Painted Bride Art Center. It is an odd title and an unusual show. Schiffer begins like a stand-up comic. "Just being back here makes me feel like I'm cutting school," she says, and pokes fun at California. Then she polls the audience on how old they were when they had children, and acts relieved when she discovers that a few had children after 35. Schiffer is glad to find these relatively late parents because she is 36, and her show revolves around the question: Should she or should she not have a baby?
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
CALM DOWN, folks. Just calm down. Temporary Tattle is about to re-report a royal announcement, and she knows how touchy some readers are about the monarchy. So, it is with the utmost respect to the crown (God Save the Queen!) that I type news you knew already: Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (please note the perfect usage of title) have announced they're expecting a second child. The Duchess, whose first name I dare not shorten, lest I offend, is believed to be fewer than three months along.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
Debra Johnson saw it coming. "Dear God. Not here, where everybody could hear," she thought. She was at a packed college basketball game, sitting alongside her great-niece, who had just learned to count. "And she was holding my hand, which we do all the time," Johnson, 54, recalled in a honeyed, Louisiana drawl. "I could see her counting her fingers, and then she would reach over and . . . count mine. " And then it came. "I have five fingers . . . . You have four?" "Yes, I do. " "Why?"
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
THE DUCHESS of Cambridge (a/k/a Kate Middleton) left a London hospital Thursday after being treated for four days for acute morning sickness related to her pregnancy. Clutching a small bouquet of yellow roses, the duchess smiled and posed briefly for a photograph alongside her husband, Prince William , before leaving King Edward VII Hospital. She stepped delicately, as she does everything, into a waiting car. The couple's office said she would head to Kensington Palace in London to rest.
SPORTS
April 23, 2009
To: Jensen, Mike; Fox, Ashley Subject: Leaving for the NBA I'm feeling serious today. Perhaps it's the sober example set by the regular Talkin' crew or maybe it's because my Starbucks gift card just hit $0.00. Anyway, I see that Villanova's Scottie Reynolds may be leaving early and that the NCAA is considering a proposal to make it more difficult for underclassmen who declare for the NBA draft. If it enacts the plan, that would be gross hypocrisy. The NCAA enriches itself and its coaches on the backs of kids who aren't even permitted money for a bus ride home.
NEWS
May 10, 2001
Two wrongs not right What happened to that police officer (letter May 7) was certainly wrong, but we lose our composure when someone violates the law. As long as the culprit is apprehended, he should be jailed. No need in adding an extra burden on the city with legal problems. No one deserves to be dragged by a car, as the policeman was, or beaten, as the suspect was. Let's think positively, not negatively. ROBERT L. McGEE SR., Camden Divided into four parts The School District of Philadelphia should be divided into four quadrants, each run by a chief executive officer and chief financial officer, each reporting to the superintendent, but with jurisdiction over its own schools.
SPORTS
December 29, 2000 | By Rich Fisher, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Anyone complaining about holiday preparations putting a crimp in their schedule should check out Joy Silver's itinerary. The 20-year-old Rutgers-Camden sophomore center is taking a full course load as a criminal justice major while also caring for her 15-month-old son, Isaac. In her "spare" time, the 5-foot-11 Silver is leading the 7-2 Raptors women's basketball team in scoring (18.3 points per game), rebounding (9.7), assists (11), and blocked shots (5). "I'm going crazy every day," Silver said, repeating it for emphasis in a drawn out "Ev-er-y day. " "But I'm glad it happened," she quickly added, referring to Isaac's birth.
LIVING
October 30, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the legions of American women who put up with months of nausea and vomiting rather than risk taking medication during pregnancy, there is good news. A Canadian company plans to market Diclectin, the only drug that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has declared to be safe and effective for "morning sickness" - the misnamed misery that afflicts up to 80 percent of pregnant women. Here's the kicker: The drug - made of a vitamin and an antihistamine - was approved 44 years ago. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals withdrew its American brand in 1983 because of lawsuits blaming the product for birth defects.
NEWS
February 11, 2000 | By C. Kalimah Redd, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Lisa Gedaka, the biggest thing is squatting. The Gloucester Catholic girls' basketball coach is nine months pregnant and has been instructed by her doctor not to squat on the sideline. Too much of it could put pressure on the baby and cause premature rupturing of the amniotic sac. Gedaka was due to give birth Sunday, but she has continued to coach - and tried to avoid squatting. "It's very hard because now that I can't squat, I didn't realize how much I did do it," Gedaka said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1998 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two parts. Two networks. And one very hot English actress, who's all over the dial tonight. Helen Baxendale begins her evening at 8 on NBC, continuing her guest-star run on Friends as Ross' post-Rachel romance, Emily. Then, at 9, it's over to PBS, where tonight and every Thursday through May 21 she'll be playing the slightly dour, diffident Cordelia Gray, an office assistant turned fledgling detective in An Unsuitable Job for a Woman, based on the novel by P.D. James. So how'd she do it?
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
He was partying too much and had no sense of direction. - A morally outraged Dennis Rodman, on the last days of Chris Farley It was never a question of "if," right? It was just a question of "when. " It was yesterday when a pair of French paparazzi turned their lenses on young British princes William and Harry, breaking a promise to not pester the royal teen-agers in their private moments. Editors and photographers had solemnly taken the pledge in the days following the grisly Aug. 31 death of the boys' mother, Princess Diana.
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