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Morphine

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March 17, 1997 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER
Morphine is a one-trick pony, but the Boston trio does its trick very well. With only bass, drums (no cymbals), baritone sax and very little radio airplay, the band sold out the Trocadero on the first night of its tour. Saturday's diverse crowd was out looking for a good time on St. Patrick's Day weekend, and already seemed familiar with the material from the just-released Like Swimming. Morphine is a study in basics. Frontman Mark Sandman, who sings like a cross between Lou Reed and Mark Knopfler (and looks like a cross between Lou Reed and Fred Gwynne)
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | by Richard Horton, Special to the Daily News
Premature babies feel pain. This statement may seem obvious. But as recently as 1987, when a report in the medical journal, The Lancet, compared the effects of surgery in pre-term infants with and without anesthetic, a fierce debate ensued. The subject: What are the ethics of withholding anesthesia? Dr. K.J.S. Anand, who led the research, referred to "traditional beliefs that pre-term babies are not able to perceive pain. " No infant in the study "displayed any clinical evidence of pain during the surgical procedure," he wrote.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I have an embarrassing story to tell you about how I tore my quadriceps muscle. I didn't do it skiing or running, snowboarding or hiking. All I did was get off the toilet seat. Yes, I'm too old to pee-pee without hazard. Last Sunday I left the bathroom, took a step, and got a pain in my thigh that felt as bad as childbirth without the ice chips. I tried to take two more steps, but couldn't walk. I broke out in a sweat and cried out in pain. The dogs didn't notice anything amiss.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Hospital's decision to treat a newborn boy for morphine withdrawal against his mother's wishes has unleashed a brouhaha, including an emergency court order, a social-media storm, and plans for a protest demonstration Friday morning in front of the hospital on Spruce Street. All sides agree that the mother, Jade Nelson, 22, takes prescription morphine to relieve chronic pain caused by sickle-cell anemia, and that her son was born Dec. 27 with the drug in his system. But many other facts - the baby's condition, the parents' behavior, and the doctors' management of the case - are in dispute.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1998 | By Dianna Sinovic, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you are in pain, you want relief. That is easy to say, but not so easy to do. "Pain is one of the more under-treated conditions in medicine today," said Robert T. Nelsen, managing director at Arch Venture Partners in Seattle, "and part of the reason is that there aren't great drugs without a lot of side effects. " Despite the proliferation of analgesics on the market, they all basically work the same way. And the gold standard for treating severe pain, morphine, causes serious side effects.
NEWS
October 6, 1994 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Tremaine Jackson recovered in a hospital bed from a gunshot wound suffered in a gun battle with FBI agents in March, did the painkillers in his body render unreliable his confession to detectives? Yesterday, his defense team put a doctor on the stand to tell a jury that the morphine and other drugs given Jackson raised doubt about his statements to the homicide detectives. "No. I don't think at that point in time is when you should read someone their rights," Andrew Levette Jr., an anesthesiologist, told defense lawyer Quentin Brooks.
NEWS
September 1, 2007 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Garrett Reid, son of Eagles coach Andy Reid, found himself back in court yesterday after testing positive for drugs in his urine. Montgomery County Court Judge Steven T. O'Neill said the amount of morphine in an Aug. 10 test was so low that technicians could not determine whether he had used heroin or simply eaten a poppy-seed bagel. But O'Neill said that Reid, as a drug addict, would not get the benefit of the doubt. He therefore ordered Reid to be confined to home and not to drive until he has his sentencing in about two months on the drug and traffic charges to which he pleaded guilty July 26. No new charges were filed.
NEWS
August 26, 2008 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Chester County coroner could not determine whether a Phoenixville man who died five days after his arrest at a concert in Camden last summer was the victim of an accident or a homicide. The family of Brett Katzenmoyer has charged in a federal lawsuit that he died after being beaten by Camden police. The corner did note that the 21-year-oldsuffered head injuries while being subdued by police, and suffered "extensive microscopic" brain damage consistent with a severe concussion.
NEWS
January 13, 2013
Chanting "free baby Dillen," seven people stood in front of Pennsylvania Hospital on Friday morning to protest its decision to treat newborn Dillen Whitest for morphine withdrawal against the wishes of his mother, Jade Nelson. The baby was born with morphine in his system because Nelson, 22, of North Philadelphia, takes prescription morphine for pain caused by sickle cell anemia. Hospital officials say the baby, born Dec. 27, needed to be given and then gradually weaned from morphine to relieve withdrawal symptoms, a contention the family disputes.
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NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Years after he was exposed to Agent Orange in the steamy jungles of Vietnam, Bob Evans was prescribed morphine to kill his excruciating pain. He lived mostly in a stupor until early last year, when he began weaning himself off the addictive drug. A few months later, Evans, 66, surprised his family and friends by dancing with his daughter, Amanda, at her wedding. "I feel so much better," Evans said in an interview last month in the Mount Laurel home he shares with his wife, Donna.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Mancini, the Philadelphia nurse prosecuted for handing her 93-year-old dying father his prescription morphine, has quit her job and is devoting herself to advocating for state "Death With Dignity" laws. Mancini, 58, has been traveling the country, telling audiences that she was wrongly prosecuted, that her father's end-of-life wishes were clearly stated and cruelly ignored, and that the hospice involved failed him. She is haunted by what happened to her father and to her. "I'm trying in my mind to make this right for my dad. I'm doing it for him," Mancini said after speaking to 70 senior citizens at the Free Library of Philadelphia branch on Rittenhouse Square.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
IF YOU THOUGHT Jason David Frank was an animated character as Tommy Oliver in "Mighty Morphin Power Rangers," just wait until you ask him about Wizard Con Philly 2014. "I love Wizard . . . they're there for the fans," says Frank. "They're very organized and I know what I'm getting into. I'm doing a Q&A, I have VIP Meet and Greets and I have a karate class that's free on Sunday. " "It's just the best," Frank added. "You might have one or two actors from people's favorite shows from the '80s and '90s and then have people from current shows like 'The Walking Dead.' Even kids that show up on Sunday get a chance to have something to do because . . . there's stuff for kids.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the hospice nurse called police in the assisted-suicide case of Barbara Mancini, David Casarett knew he had work to do. He feared that the actions of one hospice nurse could discourage Americans from using that model of palliative care for the terminally ill, or inhibit dying people in pain from taking morphine. So Casarett, a University of Pennsylvania physician and chief medical officer of Penn-Wissahickon Hospice, teamed with law professor Thaddeus Pope, formerly of Widener University and an expert in end-of-life law, to develop ethical guidelines for hospice workers nationwide on when to report suspicions of assisted suicide.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A legal defense fund has been set up to help Barbara Mancini, the Philadelphia nurse charged with assisted suicide for giving her 93-year-old father morphine in February. The fund was created by Compassion & Choices, an advocacy group focused on giving dying people more control at the end of life. Mancini, 57, of Roxborough, has incurred more than $104,000 in legal fees, said her husband, Joe. "We are very grateful," he said Tuesday. He said he and his wife had paid attorney fees by draining their college fund and borrowing from family members whom they hope to repay.
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
If she lived in Oregon, Washington state, or Vermont, Barbara Mancini could have handed her terminally ill father the morphine he wanted, and there the story would have ended. But in Pennsylvania, it was just the start of a legal saga that has refueled the national debate over assisted suicide and cast the 57-year-old Philadelphia nurse as either a compassionate daughter comforting a dying man, or a criminal enabler in his death. Under the state penal code, "a person who intentionally aids or solicits another to commit suicide is guilty of a felony.
NEWS
October 12, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
POTTSVILLE, Pa. - Barbara Mancini, a Philadelphia nurse charged with a felony of assisted suicide, pressured a hospice to prescribe morphine for her father with the intention of helping him end his life, Senior Deputy Attorney General Anthony Forray argued Thursday. During a hearing focused on a defense motion to dismiss the felony charge, Forray said Mancini gave her father a bottle of morphine knowing it could end his life. When the morphine didn't do the job, she asked a hospice nurse for more, Forray said.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia nurse charged with assisted suicide for giving morphine to her terminally ill, 93-year-old father has been suspended from her job without pay, run up legal fees of $90,000, and often can't sleep because she feels so angry and hurt, her husband said in an interview. "It is at times, for all of us, unbearable," Joe Mancini said, at times breaking into tears himself. Barbara Mancini, 57, was charged with aiding a suicide, a felony, on Feb. 7 in Pottsville. Her case erupted into worldwide news after her preliminary hearing on Aug. 1. She could face up to 10 years in prison.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia nurse charged with assisted suicide in the death of her terminally ill, 93-year-old father has asked a court to dismiss the case. Attorneys for Barbara Mancini, 57, on Tuesday filed the petition in Schuylkill County Court. They argued that she did nothing more than hand her father, Joe Yourshaw, his bottle of morphine at his request last February while he was in hospice care at his Pottsville home. Mancini's attorneys also contend that the state law that forbids aiding a suicide is vague; that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that dying patients have a right to all the pain relief they need even if it hastens death; and that Yourshaw's death was not a suicide because he did not die until four days later in the hospital.
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Yourshaw was 93 and in hospice care at his home in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, in February when he asked his visiting daughter for his bottle of morphine. That much appears undisputed. Now, Barbara Mancini of Philadelphia is facing prosecution for allegedly aiding her father's suicide - an allegation she denied through her lawyers. "Prosecution of Mancini is an assault on a loving daughter and a violation of a dying patient's constitutional right to pain relief," said Kathryn Tucker, a lawyer with Denver-based Compassion and Choices, an end-of-life advocacy group that is helping Mancini.
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