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Morse Code

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NEWS
April 5, 1997 | By Stephen A. Arata
All of the electricity in my house went out not long ago. When we tried to turn on our two flashlights, we discovered that the batteries were dead. We finally went to the emergency drawer in the kitchen and pulled out some candles and matches. By the candles' light, dinner was finished, homework was completed, and stories were told. By that same candlelight, I read a magazine article about the gradual phasing out of the supposedly antiquated system of Morse Code. I thought, with a great sense of irony, that those who wished to do away with Morse Code probably didn't have any candles in an emergency drawer somewhere.
LIVING
February 15, 2000 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most days, when Charles Fulp is operating, people call him "Doctor. " He's a dentist with a practice in his comfortable stone house in Perkasie, Bucks County. This weekend, though, Fulp will operate in his cramped basement, and he will be simply "K3WW," his amateur-radio call sign, as he chats with other hams all over the world. Fulp will be participating in a contest, practicing what even its adherents acknowledge is a dying art: Communicating by Morse code. Dits and dahs - the short and long beeps that for 150 years told the world of war, peace, rising stocks, sinking ships, new babies and dead soldiers - are used regularly today by virtually no one other than a select group of amateur radio operators.
NEWS
January 30, 1999
It came to the rescue countless times out in the open seas. In one of the cheesiest sci-fi films of the '90s - "Independence Day" - it was used to coordinate the attack on the marauding aliens. But thanks to new technology, the world may have to lay in ruin before you hear a Morse code message again. On Monday, the Morse code dashes off as nations around the world turn off their beeping equipment and switch over to a satellite- and radio-based system. All passenger ships and most cargo ships traveling on international waters must also use the new system.
NEWS
August 25, 1993 | Daily News wire services
FOND DU LAC, WISC. GIVING A LESSON ON WORK ETHIC Some students wondered why he didn't quit. And he certainly doesn't need the paycheck. But the winner of half of a record $111 million lottery jackpot went back to work yesterday as a junior high teacher. "In the halls, you hear congratulations, but otherwise I don't think it's too different," said Leslie Robins. Well, actually there was one big difference. Robins wore a colorful tie bearing the cartoon characters Sylvester the Cat and Tweety Bird.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Compared with past outings, the Warminster Amateur Radio Club's 1987 Field Day seemed, on the surface, decidedly unspectacular. High winds and rain plagued the annual event several years ago, but participants at the weekend event were treated to sunny skies and warm weather. There was no local disaster, as there was in 1971 when flooding upstate led to the declaration of a state of emergency and the field outing was cut short so members could lend assistance. And the club used conventional gas-powered generators to produce electricity, not the bicycle-powered generator that was tried one year.
NEWS
August 6, 2004
New Jersey politicians may be looking for new ways to communicate since the FBI is tape-recording their conversations. It made headlines in New Jersey that a guy named Mark Halper, who was wired by the U.S. attorney in New Jersey, is involving Gov. McGreevey in the arrest of a guy named David D'Amiano. D'Amiano is said to have required a political payoff in exchange for Halper's getting much more than $3 million for his farmland. In a conversation between Halper and Gov. McGreevey, which was tape-recorded without the governor's knowledge, the governor said the word "Machiavelli.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | By Pamela Stock, Special to The Inquirer
In the age of communication through personal lap-top computers, advanced cablevision and personal FAX machines, why would anyone want to bother with ham radio? The 23 hams who took the Federal Communications Commission-required amateur-radio licensing exams administered at the Warminster Recreation Center last Thursday gave many reasons - in both English and Morse code. After all, their hobby is striking up conversations with any of some one million people worldwide. Susan Kang, 15, of Horsham, along with her brothers Steven, 17, and James, 13, first became interested in amateur radio because their father had one. "I think it's fascinating that you can speak to people all over the world," she said.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
Dave Wittman of Wallingford communicates with people all over the United States by Morse code, tapping out 20 words per minute, and decoding dots and dashes from those who answer his signal. John Bartholomew of Broomall belongs to a 700-member radio network that requires each new member to make a rooster call. Vic Tenaglia of Yeadon speaks to others around the world by means of state- of-the-art computer-generated digital electronic bursts and often sends his transmissions to satellites that relay them halfway across the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1988 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Val is offering a night's lodging to one and all. Bring the kids. Val lives in Teleneshty. That's Teleneshty, Moldavia, U.S.S.R. "Yes, I am serious," he was saying in beautiful English to fellow amateur radio operators who were listening on the radio band on a recent night. "Just, please, write first. " Such familiarity is commonplace in a hobby that puts everyday people in touch with everyday people, bound warmly by a love of radio and electronics. One million everyday people bound warmly to a comfy chair, as well.
NEWS
May 7, 2004 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
The U.S. Mint's offering of a silver, five-coin set of the 2004 state quarters has won the interest of collectors. Sales are near 50,000 sets, all struck at the San Francisco Mint and carry the "S" mint mark. Sets cost $23.95, and include the Michigan, Florida, Texas, Iowa and Wisconsin quarters. Whether the mint will strike sets of earlier quarter issues is an open question, but silver sets of the complete, 50-state series would add interest for collectors. Queries go to the mint at 1-800-872-6468, or online at www.usmint.
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NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Emery P. Dalesio, Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. - N. Joseph Woodland, 91, the coinventor of the bar code that labels nearly every product in stores and has boosted productivity in nearly every sector of commerce worldwide, has died. Mr. Woodland, who was born in Atlantic City, died Sunday in Edgewater, N.J., from the effects of Alzheimer's disease and complications of his advanced age, his daughter, Susan Woodland, said Thursday. Mr. Woodland and Bernard Silver were students at Philadelphia's Drexel Institute of Technology - now Drexel University - when Silver overheard a grocery executive asking an engineering school dean to channel students into research on how product information could be captured at checkout, Susan Woodland said.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
RICHMOND, VA. - Tobacco companies have introduced almost no new cigarettes or smokeless tobacco products in the U.S. in more than 18 months because the federal government has prevented them from doing so, an Associated Press review has found. It's an unprecedented pause for an industry that historically has introduced dozens of new products annually. Officials at the FDA say that the reviews of applications for new products have taken so long because of "significant deficiencies" and because the agency is taking extra care in reviewing products that pose public-health risks.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | Reid Kanaley
When a video won't run on your smartphone's native browser, or you need to scan and share a document, it would be good to have some software applications on hand that serve the moment. Here are some to keep in mind. Skyfire Web Browser , by Skyfire Labs Inc. is $2.99 on Apple devices and $4.99 for the full version on Android after a three-day free trial. Skyfire's usefulness on the iPhone is its ability to play many videos that run on Adobe's Flash software — something Apple's Safari browser doesn't do. The Skyfire trick for both Apple and Android devices is to compress incoming video, dramatically shrinking your data usage.
REAL_ESTATE
January 1, 2012 | By Al Heavens, Inquirer Columnist
Are you the sort of person someone at the turn of the 20th century might have called a "tinkerer"? I'm referring to the type who likes to build things or learn something new every day, no matter how old he or she gets. When I was a teenager, I lived next door to a guy who kept bees and sold the honey to neighbors and friends, after reassuring all of us that we had little chance of being stung if we just left the insects alone. To save money, my father took a night course at the high school to learn car repair - long before a tune-up required a laptop and automaker-designated software.
NEWS
October 30, 2011 | By John Rogers, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Long before there was an Internet or an iPad, before people were social-networking and instant-messaging, Americans were already wired. Last Monday marked the 150th anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental telegraph. It electronically knitted together a nation that was simultaneously tearing itself apart, North and South, in the Civil War. "It was huge," says Amy Fischer, archivist for Western Union, which strung the line across mountains, canyons and tribal lands to make the final connection.
NEWS
November 26, 2006 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carla-Sabrina Pomponi is a treasure hunter. Every day, the armchair adventurer pores over a gem of a children's tale about good and evil fairies and plots her quest for $2 million in real-life booty. The Royersford florist and musician is among a legion of puzzlers of all ages beguiled by Secrets of the Alchemist Dar, a fantasy picture book by Michael Stadther that conceals visual clues in its lush illustrations. The cryptic notations lead to 100 diamond rings - one worth $1 million - paid for by the author and hidden somewhere in the terrestial or cyber world.
NEWS
August 6, 2004
New Jersey politicians may be looking for new ways to communicate since the FBI is tape-recording their conversations. It made headlines in New Jersey that a guy named Mark Halper, who was wired by the U.S. attorney in New Jersey, is involving Gov. McGreevey in the arrest of a guy named David D'Amiano. D'Amiano is said to have required a political payoff in exchange for Halper's getting much more than $3 million for his farmland. In a conversation between Halper and Gov. McGreevey, which was tape-recorded without the governor's knowledge, the governor said the word "Machiavelli.
NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Radio gear and laptops? Check. Hot dogs, pastries, potato chips, Twizzlers and sodas? Roger. Twenty-five ham radio operators from throughout Chester County came well prepared for their annual 24-hour Field Day competition, held recently in the basement of the county's Government Services Center on Westtown Road. The goal was simple: To contact as many other ham radio operators as possible, all over the world, in a 24-hour period. Meanwhile, clubs around North America were trying to do the same thing in the competition, which has been held since 1933.
NEWS
May 7, 2004 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
The U.S. Mint's offering of a silver, five-coin set of the 2004 state quarters has won the interest of collectors. Sales are near 50,000 sets, all struck at the San Francisco Mint and carry the "S" mint mark. Sets cost $23.95, and include the Michigan, Florida, Texas, Iowa and Wisconsin quarters. Whether the mint will strike sets of earlier quarter issues is an open question, but silver sets of the complete, 50-state series would add interest for collectors. Queries go to the mint at 1-800-872-6468, or online at www.usmint.
NEWS
January 1, 2002 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Regis, call me. Word is you desperately need a phone-a-friend, a lifeline for your ailing show. Who Wants to Be a Millionaire was once a ratings juggernaut, placing several shows a week atop the Nielsens. But it has slipped badly, and ABC has said it might pull the plug after this season. There's even talk of letting a comedian host and exiling you, Reege, to a syndicated version. Wrong answer! Yes, we know the theories - overexposure, tough time slots, a rival in Weakest Link, blah, blah, blah.
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