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Mortality Rates

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NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Two Abington Township hospitals have been recognized as being among 100 hospitals nationwide with the lowest mortality rates for patients older than 65. Abington Memorial Hospital, with 460 beds, and the 254-bed Holy Redeemer Hospital, located about a mile apart, were among 11 Pennsylvania hospitals on the list. The list was compiled by a Chicago-based independent health-care-consulting firm, Michael Pine Associates Inc., which used data from the federal Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA)
NEWS
March 23, 1986
It is a rare thing when an agency of the federal government takes action on a controversial issue and manages to provide a clear public service. Recently the Health Care Financing Administration released a report on the mortality rates of Medicare patients receiving treatment or surgery for nine common procedures: congestive heart failure, heart attack, pneumonia, gallbladder, prostate, pacemaker implant, coronary bypass, gastrointestinal hemorrhage and major joint procedures. This information gives the public for the first time an understanding of a basic difference in the ability of specific hospitals to provide particular treatments.
NEWS
December 28, 2001
Philadelphia is indeed fortunate to have one of the nation's premier medical centers. For its medical expertise, its advanced research, and its high teaching standards, the 700-bed Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania consistently ranks among the top hospitals and academic medical institutions in the United States. (The influential U.S. News and World Report's "best hospitals" listing ranked HUP number 10 in 2000 and number 14 this year.) It is especially disquieting, then, to learn that HUP fared badly in the latest statewide hospital assessment by the independent Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new state report that compares hospital performance on 15 common medical problems concludes that most institutions in this region are providing "good to excellent care," said Joe Martin, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, which produced the report. The report, which is based on 1997 data, compares the hospitals on volume, mortality rates, how long patients stayed in the hospital and how much the hospitals charged for care. Categories include heart attack, stroke, pneumonia and hip operations.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, one of the region's premier academic medical centers, had higher-than-expected death rates in five of 22 categories of medical care examined in a state report released today. That was the worst performance of any hospital in the state. The report, compiled by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, an independent state agency, examined care provided in 2000. Last year was a period of upheaval for the University of Pennsylvania Health System, to which HUP belongs.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1999 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Death rates at Southeastern Pennsylvania hospitals were at expected levels last year, but charges were higher than the statewide average for 15 medical treatments and procedures, according to a report being released today by an independent state agency. The hospital performance report, issued by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, found that mortality rates at 53 area hospitals dropped for eight conditions it studied, but rose for seven others. The hospitals' overall mortality rate for the 15 conditions was unchanged from a year earlier at 7.5 percent.
NEWS
December 17, 1999 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia hospitals are among 14 in the state that had higher than expected death rates for certain medical procedures for two years in a row, according to a state agency. The Health Care Cost Containment Council said Temple University Hospital had a higher than expected mortality rate for vessel surgery involving the aorta and other major arteries and veins surrounding the heart, in both 1997 and 1998. Episcopal Hospital had higher than expected death rates for stroke and major intestinal procedures, according to the council's latest report, on 1998 data, which was to be issued today.
NEWS
March 16, 1986 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consider these numbers. In 1984, 50 Medicare patients underwent coronary bypass surgery at the hospital of the Medical College of Pennsylvania. Of that number, 20 percent died, according to federal hospital mortality records released last week. The same year, 448 Medicare patients underwent bypass surgery at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. According to those same records, 1.8 percent died. How is it that two major teaching hospitals, each prestigious in its own right, have such vastly different track records performing bypass surgery?
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A New Jersey health-care monitoring organization yesterday released a list of mortality rates for New Jersey's 92 hospitals and said nearly all had death rates within expected ranges. At the same time, the organization's report reignited a dispute over whether such figures were significant and should be released to the public. The federal government has twice since 1986 released its own hospital mortality rates, but the Garden State organization - the Peer Review Organization (PRO)
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
A study by a private firm has turned up higher than anticipated mortality rates for two groups of recipients in a state-administered health care program, but the cause of the deviation has yet to be determined. The study by the Solon Consulting Group of Silver Spring, Md., showed that while overall mortality rates for participants in the HealthPass program were slightly lower than for other Philadelphia Medicaid recipients, higher rates were recorded for HealthPass obstetrical patients over 40 who were treated in hospitals.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A new study offers more evidence that life expectancy for some U.S. women is falling, a disturbing trend that experts can't explain. The latest research found that women younger than 76 are dying at higher rates than in previous years in nearly half of the nation's counties - many of them rural and in the South and West. For men, life expectancy has held steady or improved in nearly all counties. The study is the latest to spot this pattern, especially among disadvantaged white women.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
An upward blip in Philadelphia's infant-mortality rate in the late 1990s was related to the closures of several hospital maternity units in the city, a new study concludes. Financial pressures led 13 of the city's 19 maternity units to shut down between 1997 and 2009, a cut that worried the medical community. The study, led by Scott A. Lorch, a neonatologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, looked only at the period 1995 through 2005, when nine maternity units closed. To his surprise, the newborn death rate rose abruptly after the first several closures in the mid-1990s, but then returned to the pre-closure rate - even though more hospitals stopped delivering babies.
NEWS
June 22, 2010 | By HESHIMU JARAMOGI
PHILADELPHIA City Council recently held hearings on the issue of infant mortality. Many experts testified. A lot of important information was shared - much of which we've heard over the last 20 years. Let's review some of that data. There is a disparity in the rates of infant mortality affecting African-Americans and others in the city and state. West, Southwest and upper North Philadelphia have the highest rates of infant mortality, according to Melita Jordan, director of the state health department's bureau of family health.
SPORTS
February 1, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Players in the NFL, although bigger and stronger than ever, are dying young at a rate expers find alarming according to a study by the Scripps Howard News Service. The study found that many of the players are dying from ailments typically related to weight. The heaviest athletes are more than twice as likely to die before their 50th birthday than their teammates, according to the study, which used a computer database containing information from 3,850 former professional football players who died in the last century.
NEWS
December 2, 2003 | By ELLIOTT S. FISHER
NO ONE IN Washington is completely satisfied with the Medicare legislation that Congress approved last week. For many conservatives, the shift toward private health plans is too limited; for many liberals, the new prescription-drug benefit is too stingy. Yet almost everyone agrees that the current bill worsens the program's long-term financial stability. Constructive debate about Medicare's costs, however, is hampered by a flawed assumption: that more care - and more expensive care - is better care.
NEWS
December 28, 2001
Philadelphia is indeed fortunate to have one of the nation's premier medical centers. For its medical expertise, its advanced research, and its high teaching standards, the 700-bed Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania consistently ranks among the top hospitals and academic medical institutions in the United States. (The influential U.S. News and World Report's "best hospitals" listing ranked HUP number 10 in 2000 and number 14 this year.) It is especially disquieting, then, to learn that HUP fared badly in the latest statewide hospital assessment by the independent Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, one of the region's premier academic medical centers, had higher-than-expected death rates in five of 22 categories of medical care examined in a state report released today. That was the worst performance of any hospital in the state. The report, compiled by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, an independent state agency, examined care provided in 2000. Last year was a period of upheaval for the University of Pennsylvania Health System, to which HUP belongs.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mortality rates at most Pennsylvania hospitals were within the expected range last year, but there are significant differences in two other possible quality indicators - length of stay and readmission rates - according to a report released today. "Basically, when you look across the commonwealth, the public is getting pretty good care," said Marc Volavka, executive director of the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, known as PHC4. "There are still areas for quality improvement.
NEWS
December 17, 1999 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia hospitals are among 14 in the state that had higher than expected death rates for certain medical procedures for two years in a row, according to a state agency. The Health Care Cost Containment Council said Temple University Hospital had a higher than expected mortality rate for vessel surgery involving the aorta and other major arteries and veins surrounding the heart, in both 1997 and 1998. Episcopal Hospital had higher than expected death rates for stroke and major intestinal procedures, according to the council's latest report, on 1998 data, which was to be issued today.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1999 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Death rates at Southeastern Pennsylvania hospitals were at expected levels last year, but charges were higher than the statewide average for 15 medical treatments and procedures, according to a report being released today by an independent state agency. The hospital performance report, issued by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, found that mortality rates at 53 area hospitals dropped for eight conditions it studied, but rose for seven others. The hospitals' overall mortality rate for the 15 conditions was unchanged from a year earlier at 7.5 percent.
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