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Mortar

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FOOD
September 13, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
A mortar and pestle are not to be found in most kitchens, though most cooks know what they are. And those who do own them probably rarely - if ever - use them. For the record, the mortar is a bowl-shaped container that can be made of glass, porcelain, wood etc. Ingredients such as peppercorns, seeds and nuts are pulverized in the mortar by crushing them with the pestle - a small, clublike implement. Diana Kennedy, author of The Cuisines of Mexico (Harper & Row), calls the mortar and pestle - molcajete and tejolote in Spanish - indispensable not only for serious Mexican cooks, but for all who love the kitchen.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Scott Sonner and Ted Bridis, Associated Press
HAWTHORNE, Nev. - A mortar shell explosion killed eight Marines and injured a half-dozen more during mountain warfare training in Nevada's high desert, prompting the Pentagon to immediately halt the use of some of the weapons worldwide until an investigation can determine their safety, officials said Tuesday. The explosion occurred Monday night at the Hawthorne Army Depot, a facility used by troops heading overseas, during an exercise involving the Second Marine Expeditionary Force from Camp Lejeune, N.C. Several Marines from the unit were injured in the blast, authorities said.
REAL_ESTATE
July 8, 1988 | By Al Carrell, Special to The Inquirer
Our home is not new, and we've noticed some areas where the mortar looks as though it's starting to fall out from around some of the bricks. I assume I can just replace it, but how do you do this? Mortar can erode with time and because of wind and excess moisture. Chimneys, wing walls and areas where water drains away are the first to go. When this happens, it's time for tuck-pointing. The first step is to clean out the bad spots. The best way is to use a cold chisel to remove all the loose mortar.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1987 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owners of a retail and commercial office complex in Bethlehem, Pa., yesterday joined the growing list of those who have filed suits charging Dow Chemical Co. with fraud and federal racketeering violations in the development of an allegedly defective mortar additive. GLS, a general partnership that owns the three-story Marketplace in Bethlehem, also charged Dow with marketing the additive, called Sarabond, despite knowledge that it was "inherently dangerous, defective and hazardous" and would cause severe structural damage in buildings that used it. The alleged scheme to defraud users constituted racketeering, the suit charges.
LIVING
March 16, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I live in a redbrick house built in the 19th century. A few months ago, I hired a mason to come and do some pointing of the brick facade. But the mortar doesn't look the same as the original. In fact, recent rains seem to have washed some of the mortar onto the brick face, so it looks like it is streaking. Some of the brick looks like it is chipping off. Why did this happen? Answer: It likely has something to do with the composition of the mortar mixture. If you're building a new brick wall in the backyard, you're usually pretty safe buying a bag of mortar at the home center, adding the right amount of water, and going to it. But that doesn't work with pointing a brick facade as old as yours appears to be. The old brick likely is soft and porous, and the original mortar was formulated to accommodate it. Your mason probably used modern masonry cement, which is designed for the harder bricks of the last 80 or so years, rather than the older ones.
REAL_ESTATE
October 21, 1990 | By Al Carrell, Special to The Inquirer
The man who cleaned our chimney said we needed to tend to some loose mortar joints before using the fireplace this winter. What exactly is involved in repairing the joints? Do a thorough inspection of the fireplace to make sure you find all of the loose joints. If you're going to do the repair work, you might as well do all of it at once. Loose joints can be extremely dangerous and should be repaired before you light a fire. To begin, you will need to remove the loose mortar.
NEWS
July 5, 1995 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gene Foschini is perched on a scaffold at 11th and Ritner, slapping down some wet cement. But in his imagination, he's on stage, starring as Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire. "Remember what Huey Long said - 'every man is uh king,' " the South Philly bricklayer says in his best Louisiana accent. "And I am the king around heah, so don't fuh-get it!" Foschini's buddies on the scaffold nod their approval. But it's a hot summer day, and two stories up, the cement is drying fast.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We have a brick and mortar edging on our driveway and steps leading up to the front door. The mortar needs repair. Is this something we can do ourselves, or should we have a professional do it? Answer: These are the kinds of jobs performed by masons with years of experience. Although I have built brick walkways and garden beds over the years, I've done it for the experience, rather than from necessity. I've also pointed brick chimneys and stone walls because they were jobs that had to be done quickly, or they were too small to be cost-effective for a mason to do them.
NEWS
April 21, 2004 | By Carol Rosenberg INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Insurgents fired a fusillade of mortars on the coalition-controlled Abu Ghraib prison yesterday, killing 22 Iraqi captives and wounding 92. The attack was puzzling to U.S. commanders, who consider the 4,400 detainees to be anti-U.S. insurgents, some of whom are suspected of launching similar mortar and missile attacks. Marines helped evacuate wounded detainees. Twenty-five of the seriously injured were taken by helicopter to two U.S. military field hospitals, one of which is inside the Green Zone, which houses coalition headquarters.
NEWS
January 5, 1994 | By David Lee Preston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondent Terri Sanginiti contributed to this article
Less than two weeks after three cellmates allegedly tried to make a hole in a cell wall at the Camden County Jail, officials yesterday found evidence that two other prisoners were trying the same thing in another cell. Warden David S. Owens Jr. said the two escape attempts were the first since he took over the jail after an escape on April 10. During a routine inspection about 8:20 a.m. yesterday, Owens said, a corrections officer found that a few ounces of mortar had been removed from the cinder-block wall of a third-floor cell roughly below the cell used in April - and that soap and toilet paper had been stuffed into the opening.
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NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia officials say deteriorated rubble stone and mortar, set in place in the early 1900s, caused the sudden collapse of two Cobbs Creek rowhouses Monday. As a demolition crew worked Tuesday to tear down the pancaked homes, the commissioner and emergency services director of the Department of Licenses and Inspections said "the content and structure" of a foundation, made of rubble stone and mortar, under the party wall connecting 6015 and 6017 Spruce St. had broken down over decades.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Ben Hubbard, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Mortar shells crashed into an outdoor cafe at Damascus University on Thursday, killing at least 10 students in the deadliest of a rising number of mortar attacks in the heart of the Syrian capital. The strikes have escalated as rebels fighting to topple President Bashar al-Assad try to enter the city, terrifying civilians whose support the opposition needs to advance its cause. It was unclear who fired the rounds. The government blamed "terrorists," its blanket term for those fighting Assad's regime.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Scott Sonner and Ted Bridis, Associated Press
HAWTHORNE, Nev. - A mortar shell explosion killed eight Marines and injured a half-dozen more during mountain warfare training in Nevada's high desert, prompting the Pentagon to immediately halt the use of some of the weapons worldwide until an investigation can determine their safety, officials said Tuesday. The explosion occurred Monday night at the Hawthorne Army Depot, a facility used by troops heading overseas, during an exercise involving the Second Marine Expeditionary Force from Camp Lejeune, N.C. Several Marines from the unit were injured in the blast, authorities said.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
By Brian Mello and Mark Stein The violence in Syria strayed beyond the country's borders last week, when mortar fire fell on the Turkish town of Ak├žakale, killing a woman and four children. The Turkish parliament moved quickly to authorize military retaliation, and Turkish mortars targeted Syrian military sites. Exchanges of mortar fire continued over the weekend. This marked a new phase in which one of Syria's neighbors was drawn into the fighting. Will the crisis grow into a regional war?
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
AKCAKALE, TURKEY - Turkey and Syria fired artillery and mortars across their volatile border for a fifth consecutive day on Sunday, in one of the most serious and prolonged flare-ups of violence along the frontier. The exchange of fire stoked fears that Syria's civil war will escalate into a regional conflagration drawing in NATO member Turkey, once an ally of Syria's President Bashar Assad but now a key supporter of the rebels fighting to topple him. Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu had warned on Saturday that Ankara would respond forcefully to each errant Syrian shell that lands on Turkish soil.
NEWS
May 26, 2012 | By Zeina Karam and Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - President Bashar al-Assad's forces killed at least 50 civilians, including 13 children, in central Syria on Friday, activists said, in one of the highest death tolls in one specific area since an internationally brokered cease-fire went into effect last month. Syrian troops using tanks, mortars, and heavy machine guns pounded the area of Houla, a region made up of several towns and villages in the province of Homs, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and the Local Coordination Committees activist groups said.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixty-seven years later, he still has dreams of that dark, volcanic island - and the unimaginable horrors he witnessed there. He recalls a friend shot through the head, an American flag fluttering atop a mountain, and the sharp sting of a bullet passing through his jaw. Pvt. Bob Scullin was 19 when he landed on Feb. 19, 1945, with tens of thousands of other Marines on Iwo Jima, whose very name conjures images of ferocious combat. Twenty-seven service members - 22 Marines and five Navy seamen - received the Medal of Honor for their actions during a two-month battle that claimed the lives of 4,590 Americans and more than 20,000 Japanese.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The skyline will look a little empty during the next two months for those used to seeing the Virgin Mary statue atop Camden's Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital. The upper half of the 30-foot-high statue was taken down in three sections Thursday by Kreilick Conservation and transported to Swedesboro for repairs, hospital officials said. The Aug. 23 earthquake caused a shift of several inches in the middle section of the limestone statue, which resulted in a large, vertical crack.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The skyline will look a little empty during the next two months for those used to seeing the Virgin Mary statue atop Camden's Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital. The upper half of the 30-foot-high statue was taken down in three sections by Kreilick Conservation on Thursday and transported to Swedesboro for repairs, hospital officials said. The Aug. 23 earthquake caused a shift of several inches in the middle section of the limestone statue, which resulted in a large, vertical crack.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Jessica Gresko, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Safety nets are being installed beneath the ceiling of the Washington National Cathedral to guard against falling debris after the landmark building was damaged by last week's earthquake. Putting up the netting will allow the world's sixth-largest cathedral to be used for events marking the 10th anniversary of 9/11, including a concert that evening at which President Obama will speak. The cathedral's head stonemason, Joe Alonso, said Thursday that when workers entered the building after the 5.8-magnitude quake Aug. 23, they found the floor speckled in places with small pieces of mortar that had rained down from the ceiling.
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