CollectionsMortgage Broker
IN THE NEWS

Mortgage Broker

NEWS
July 3, 2005 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a mystery worthy of Hollywood: In February, $4 million suddenly appeared in the checking account of a suspended Philadelphia lawyer. Who wired it? And why? Is it, as Homeland Security officials in Dallas allege, an effort to launder money? Could it be, as a federal prosecutor in Philadelphia suspects, part of some complex international criminal fraud? Or is it, as the lawyer insists, all quite innocent - simply a surprise investment from an old client who wants to help him make major motion pictures?
BUSINESS
May 14, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
American Business Financial Services Inc. lost $33.2 million, or $10.53 a share, in the first quarter, returning the struggling Center City lender to default status on its own loans. The company secured a temporary waiver from the lender, said Albert W. Mandia, its executive vice president and chief financial officer. While the company now expects losses through Sept. 30, "we can now see a path to profitability by the quarter ended Dec. 31," Mandia said. In late 2002, Center City promoters counted American Business Financial as a major coup, luring the lender from Bala Cynwyd with an aid and loan package from the state and city worth $19.6 million.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2003 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brenda Hayden's summer mystery, the case of the missing mortgage broker, took an expensive turn last month. After seven weeks of unanswered phone calls, the bargain mortgage rate she had landed to refinance her Marlton home did a vanishing act as well. At 5.375 percent on a 30-year loan, she would have saved $115 a month. When the broker finally called back, she said, "he told me, 'I lost your loan, and I don't know what you expect me to do about it.' " Hayden answers that he could have fessed up earlier, while she still had a chance to improve on her 6.875 percent rate.
NEWS
September 4, 2002 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Up to 200 Pennsylvania and New Jersey residents may have been defrauded by a career scam artist once dubbed the "Con Man Casanova" for previous crimes - and he is still looking for more customers, authorities warned yesterday. James J. Masiello, 56, is alleged to have stolen between $150,000 and $200,000 - and reams of personal financial information - by posing as a mortgage broker and soliciting "processing" fees from families interested in refinancing their homes, Montgomery County Assistant District Attorney Laurel Grass said.
NEWS
February 8, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A mortgage broker was appointed last night as the newest member of the Township Council. Joseph P. McCrea, 35, an assistant vice president at Countrywide Home Loans in Sewell, filled the seat vacated by Democrat Raymond J. Rapposelli. He will serve the 10 months left in Rapposelli's four-year term and, he said, will campaign in the June primary for a spot on the Democratic council ticket for the November election. McCrea said last night that his real estate experience would help with Washington Township's open-space acquisition program.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
Residents living near the sinking homes in Wissinoming say the rowhouses showed visible signs of settling long before the rapid deterioration of the past three years. Yet, families who bought the homes in that period were able to obtain mortgages. Something that should not have happened if an alert appraiser had noted the settlement and recommended further investigation before the loans were approved. According to Harry Marder, president of the American Society of Appraisers, such vigilance is not always rewarded.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Obtaining a mortgage on the Internet was supposed to take the hassle out of the financing end of Rosanne and Jason Toohey's home purchase. Earlier this year, an on-line mortgage broker found the Tooheys a competitive interest rate for their condo mortgage, but the couple didn't bargain on the delays, lost documents, misinformation and unresponsive loan agents that came with the deal. The Web-based mortgage broker reimbursed some of the unexpected costs caused by the delays, but when the mortgage finally closed five days late, the two vowed never to venture back on line for mortgage money.
REAL_ESTATE
August 2, 1998 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Although computers are transforming the real estate industry in a variety of ways, the greatest effect of this technology has been on the way houses are financed and refinanced. Especially the speed with which mortgage applications are being processed and approved. "We did our quickest one the other day - 3.41 seconds ," said Dan Rawitch, chief executive officer of Finet Holdings Corp. of Walnut Creek, Calif., which takes applications on its Web site. "It's very quick. " While most applications aren't being processed and approved in less than four seconds, the industry's computerization has cut approval time by more than half.
NEWS
April 22, 1996 | BY FRANCESCA CHAPMAN Daily News wire services, the New York Daily News, Entertainment Weekly and People magazine contributed to this report
In between bombing in "The Scarlet Letter" and irking Pentagon brass with her next role as a Navy SEAL, Demi Moore has been vigorously peddling her June 28 release, "Striptease. " Now Hollywood execs on the project are worried that the actress is not helping their cause. If you saw Moore bumping and grinding recently on the Barbara Walters special, or caught her strip act last fall on "The Late Show" with David Letterman, you've heard her pitches promoting the flick. Acoording to Moore, "Striptease" is a paean to women's self-esteem: Yeah, I'm naked in a bar full of leering old men, but I'm stripping for myself.
REAL_ESTATE
February 19, 1995 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
PNC Mortgage and Coldwell Banker Corp. will have their Home Mortgage Network joint venture up and running this month, according to the chairman of PNC Mortgage, a unit of Philadelphia's PNC Bank Corp. Home Mortgage Network will allow home buyers to shop for mortgages while they shop for a home in any of Coldwell Banker's 340 company-owned offices nationwide. Buyers will not be limited to doing business with PNC, but will have a variety of lenders to choose from, Walter C. Klein, chairman and chief executive of PNC Mortgage, said.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|