CollectionsMortgage Rates
IN THE NEWS

Mortgage Rates

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 17, 2012
Thirty-year fixed mortgage rates rose for the third straight week, climbing to 3.62 percent, Freddie Mac reported Thursday. Last week, the 30-year fixed rate average was 3.59 percent. The rate remains below the 4.15 percent it was last year at this time. The 15-year rate stood at 2.88 percent, up from 2.84 percent a week ago and below last year's 3.36 percent. "The latest economic indicators point toward low inflation but gradually stronger economic activity which placed further upward pressure on long-term Treasury yields and, in turn, fixed mortgage rates," said Freddie Mac chief economist Frank Nothaft.
NEWS
August 20, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Fixed mortgage rates dropped again this week as a new report quelled fears of accelerating inflation. The average 30-year fixed rate mortgage fell to 5.82 percent, according to Bankrate.com's weekly national survey of large lenders. The 30-year fixed rate mortgages in this week's survey had an average of 0.32 discount and origination points. The 15-year fixed rate mortgage popular for refinancing retreated from 5.3 percent to 5.2 percent. The average rate for the jumbo 30-year fixed-rate mortgage dropped from 6.12 percent to 6.06 percent, and the average one-year adjustable rate mortgage sank from 4.15 percent to 4.09 percent.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1987 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
A few area mortgage lenders edged the interest they charge on 30-year fixed-rate loans back into the single digits this week, but whether others will jump on the bandwagon is unclear. "The trend definitely has been downward," said Diane Curran, assistant director of the Mortgage Reporting Service of Jenkintown. The service publishes the weekly Mortgage Reporting Guide, which surveys 300 area lenders for mortgage rates. "But rates are not really plunging down comfortably into single digits yet. "This won't be the week to see a great rush back to single digits, but it may signal a trend.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Last week's rapid decline in mortgage rates in the Philadelphia area might start slowing today because of upbeat news about the nation's economy. The Mortgage Reporting Service, which surveys 200 lenders for its publication, the Weekly Mortgage Guide, said that an unprecedented two-thirds of the lenders had dropped their rates within the past week. The lowest rate for a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage, reported by two lenders, was 8.5 percent. Fifty lenders were reporting rates below 9 percent, the lowest in a decade.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 28, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
When it comes to mortgages, experience apparently isn't the best teacher. Recent findings by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which oversees mortgages and credit cards, among other things, show that almost half of U.S. borrowers don't shop for home loans. The findings were similar to those of LendingTree.com in December 2010, during the depths of the foreclosure crisis. That survey found that 40 percent of 1,317 people contacted obtained a single quote for a mortgage.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Fixed interest rates for 30-year mortgages remain well below 4 percent, and industry observers predict they won't break 5 percent by the end of 2015. Yet sales of both newly built and previously owned houses, while much improved since scraping bottom in 2010-11, remain well below average - because interest rates are just part of a home-buying decision. In fact, national data reflecting the last 10 years of home sales - 2005 to 2014, including the mid-decade housing boom and bust - and the interest rates during that same period suggest that one has little to do with the other.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has forced a retail chain, USA Discounters, to pay $400,000 and a mortgage lender, Amerisave Mortgage Corp., and its owner to pay more than $20 million in refunds and penalties for deceptive charges imposed on service members and home buyers, the agency said this week. The CFPB said Amerisave used a deceptive "bait-and-switch" scheme, luring customers with mortgage rates available only to people with an unusually high FICO credit score of 800 - even when they had entered a lower score on a referral site that led to Amerisave.
REAL_ESTATE
March 23, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
While the rest of us were shoveling winter's snow and slipping on ice, the survey-takers were hard at work, often coming up with residential real estate information that has little bearing on this market. OK, repeat after me: "All real estate is local. " Sometimes, however, there are nuggets to be gleaned from the volume of "breaking news" I get e-mailed to me around the clock. One, from the venerable Keith Gumbinger at HSH.com, whom I remember before he was a website, talked about affordability levels based on fourth-quarter 2013 data.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Houses are often our biggest investments. Know that borrowing rates for those wanting to take out mortgages will likely creep higher this year. Currently, a 30-year fixed mortgage costs 4.32 percent, while an adjustable rate costs 3.46 percent. In addition, refinancing won't be as easy as it has been. Tighter mortgage rules that took effect Jan. 10 limit people from taking out a mortgage or refinancing an existing one if it puts their overall household borrowing at more than 43 percent of income, according to Brian Simon, of New Penn Financial mortgage brokers in Plymouth Meeting.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
As the "polar vortex" spins down from the Arctic, stay indoors and ponder where interest rates are headed in 2014 - both as an investor and consumer. Mortgage rates? Probably 5 percent by year's end. Auto loans? Unchanged at 4.25 percent for new cars, 4.75 percent for used. The 10-year Treasury? Probably 3.5 percent to 4 percent by the second half. So says Greg McBride, senior financial analyst at Bankrate.com, in North Palm Beach, Fla. (And yeah, we are envious, Greg.) Provided America's tepid economic recovery continues apace, McBride projects that "the Federal Reserve will keep dialing down its bond purchases through the rest of this year.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It was in the depths of the real estate downturn, June 2010, that Robert I. Toll, cofounder of the luxury home builder Toll Bros. Inc., stepped down as chief executive officer and handed the reins to Douglas C. Yearley Jr. The move had been in the works for a while, but as Yearley recalled in a recent interview at corporate headquarters in Horsham, "Bob wanted to wait a bit until the market showed signs of improvement. " "He didn't want to dump a huge mess into my lap," said Yearley, 53, who joined Toll Bros.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
If the U.S. government defaults on its debt, what will be the impact in the financial world, and what does it mean for the average citizen? The answer: There would be a lot of pain to go around. Perhaps most disturbing would be universal doubt about the creditworthiness of the United States. It would be an unprecedented shattering of the international image of the nation. Right behind that comes wave after wave of fiscal uncertainty. That doubt will roil the markets, but it goes beyond just bad times for investors.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
For want of a few pieces of paper, Cheyenne DiEnno and David Bjornsson may have just lost about $14,000. Is Chase Bank to blame for a loan deal gone awry? Or did Chase try its hardest, and simply not manage to get everything it needed from the South Jersey couple in time to close their home refinancing in June - two months after they applied, and after mortgage rates had spiked? Those are key questions raised by a dispute that pits DiEnno and Bjornsson against JPMorgan Chase.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By Christopher S. Rugaber, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. sales of previously occupied homes slipped in June to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.08 million but remained near a 31/2-year high. The National Association of Realtors said Monday that sales fell 1.2 percent last month from an annual rate of 5.14 million in May. The NAR revised down May's sales, but they were still the highest since November 2009. Despite last month's dip, home sales have surged 15.2 percent from a year ago. Sales have recovered since early last year, buoyed by job gains and low mortgage rates.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|