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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The following review originally appeared during the 2008 Philadelphia Film Festival. Isaiah Zagar's art is all over Philadelphia's South Street corridor. And his restless spirit - and painful secrets - are all over In a Dream, a stunning, deeply personal documentary portrait by the muralist's youngest son, Jeremiah Zagar. Like the dazzling, colorful mosaics that Isaiah has pasted to buildings around town - crazy-quilt images of people (often including the artist himself), shards of shattered mirror, cracked crockery, wine bottles, bicycle wheels - his life has been kaleidoscopic, yet singularly focused.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a time when many city dwellers shake their heads and think "if it isn't set in concrete, someone will steal it," someone has done even that at the little Falls of Schuylkill Library. A 76-year-old tile mosaic has been extracted from the sidewalk in front of the library, which is on the corner of Midvale Avenue and Warden Drive in the city's East Falls section. "It couldn't have been easy," said librarian Wendy Robinson, who so far has been unable to solve the mystery of the missing mosaic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Isaiah Zagar's art is all over Philadelphia's South Street corridor. And his restless spirit - and painful secrets - are all over In a Dream, a stunning, deeply personal documentary portrait by the muralist's youngest son, Jeremiah Zagar. Like the dazzling, colorful mosaics that Isaiah has pasted to buildings around town - crazy-quilt images of people (often the artist himself), shards of shattered mirror, cracked crockery, bottles, bicycle wheels - his life has been kaleidoscopic, yet singularly focused.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Elizabeth Horkley, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a snowy day before the Feb. 10 opening of "Unearthing a Masterpiece" at the Penn Museum, exhibition coordinator Kate Quinn stood on South Street, watching the enormous crane that was to lift the star of the show - the magnificent late-Roman Lod mosaic - into the museum. South Street was closed to cars, but pedestrians continued to walk by even as, moments later, the first of the 17-by-24-foot floor mosaic's seven pieces rose into the air. "They were on their phones and not noticing the almost-2,000-year-old floor flying above their heads," Quinn recalls.
LIVING
March 4, 2005 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The ancient art of mosaic is back in style, and artist Sarah Kelly offers do-it-yourself advice in The Complete Mosaic Handbook: Projects, Techniques, Designs (Firefly Books, $35). The book covers the history of mosaic and includes a gallery of examples of the art form, as well as an overview of the tools and equipment needed and a primer on techniques and design. Kelly offers 26 mosaic projects for artists of all skill levels, from simple tile placemats and coasters to an elaborate peacock and a garden path.
NEWS
January 20, 1987 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
Blue Bell Elementary School art teacher Ami Silverman was troubled. In the weeks following the Challenger space-shuttle tragedy last January, her kindergarten students kept turning in drawings of flaming rocket ships and flying skulls. When discussions in other classes also showed shock and confusion at the deaths of New Hampshire schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe and six other crew members, Silverman and another teacher, Donna Hartman, decided to take a new tack and focus on McAuliffe's life and achievements.
NEWS
October 25, 2006 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
A little more than two years ago, the fantastical constructions on an old South Street double lot teetered on the edge of obliteration. Created by the feisty mosaic artist Isaiah Zagar, 67, the sculptured walls and installations that he dubbed the Magic Garden were viewed by the actual owner of the lot, a Boston-based limited partnership, as a "visual obstruction. " The work had to go, to prepare the land for sale. But Zagar, who cleared the area at 1024-26 South St. a decade ago, scattered the rats, bagged the trash, shooed away the rowdy urinators, and began to build an imaginative universe on real estate he did not own, dug in his heels.
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
He works in tiles, bright fragments of mirrors, spontaneous swirls and patterns. They work as executives for organizations. The free-spirited artist Isaiah Zagar of Philadelphia has captured the imagination of the American Society of Association Executives, which has chosen his artwork to symbolize their 6,000-person annual meeting here this year. "The theme is supposedly evolution," said Zagar. "Well, great. " Zagar, who has produced a two-panel mosaic that will later be permanently displayed in the Pennsylvania Convention Center, says he's "an intuitive poet" who doesn't think about literal translations of his work.
SPORTS
October 20, 2001 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It had to be as big as the man himself. No, bigger. It certainly did not take long for Jonathan Mandell to figure out that much. Mandell, who lives in Bala Cynwyd, is a Wilt Chamberlain fan. More important, he is an accomplished artist. So when he decided to memorialize the Philadelphia basketball legend with a mosaic at Overbrook High School, from which Chamberlain graduated in 1955, he wondered which way to go. Go small? Or go large, like Chamberlain himself? Mandell went large.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Elizabeth Horkley, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a snowy day before the Feb. 10 opening of "Unearthing a Masterpiece" at the Penn Museum, exhibition coordinator Kate Quinn stood on South Street, watching the enormous crane that was to lift the star of the show - the magnificent late-Roman Lod mosaic - into the museum. South Street was closed to cars, but pedestrians continued to walk by even as, moments later, the first of the 17-by-24-foot floor mosaic's seven pieces rose into the air. "They were on their phones and not noticing the almost-2,000-year-old floor flying above their heads," Quinn recalls.
REAL_ESTATE
February 4, 2013 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Most parents don't think of being a twosome again until the house is devoid of offspring. Not Suzanne and Chuck Cruit of Media. Maybe it was because the Cruit nest had no one zip code for long. During the couple's 28 years of marriage, they have lived in Washington, D.C.; Huntington Beach, Calif.; Newtown Square, Delaware County; and East Goshen, Chester County. With life's changes so clearly and chronologically documented, the Cruits didn't need a crystal ball to get an accurate picture of the future.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, Marla Milgram has been a fan of the Barnes Museum, even taking a yearlong course on its world-famous collection of impressionist paintings. Now, with the museum set to move from Lower Merion to Philadelphia, Milgram has found a way to keep a piece of the Barnes close to home. In her home, actually. She commissioned local artist Jonathan Mandell to create a mosaic depicting the eastern end of the museum's Great Room, with all the famous works of art re-created in tiny shards of glass, tile, and stone.
NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the summer of 1988, Salvatore Ciambella was at work in the lobby of the former Bellevue-Stratford hotel in Center City. In the lobby. On the lobby. Mr. Ciambella was on his hands and knees, restoring parts of the mosaic, tile by tiny tile. "It's tedious," Mr. Ciambella told an Inquirer interviewer. "But I like the challenge. " On Friday, Oct. 7, Mr. Ciambella, 82, a stone mason and lifelong resident of Chestnut Hill, died of leukemia at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
THE NEW year ushers in a fresh start for many of Philadelphia's cultural institutions. Catch these events before they shutter for good. And don't say we didn't warn you. Franklin Square Remember summer? Prolong those sweet memories with one last visit to Franklin Square before the rehabbed park closes up shop until April. The mini-golf course, playground and Philadelphia Park Liberty Carousel are all open, despite the weather outside being more frightful than delightful. Kids are treated to their own version of New Year's Eve ( sans champagne)
NEWS
November 30, 2010 | By Katie Eder, Inquirer Staff Writer
On an unusually warm Sunday for November, four very different Chester County artists arrived at their exhibit at West Chester University, bringing with them a large canvas and paint supplies. They had not come to create art alone. Accompanying them were nine children, ages 4 to 16, who live in emergency shelters throughout Chester County. Most said they had never worked with paint before, not even in school. "We don't have a lot of money to give, but we have our time and our skills," said Adrian Martinez, a 61-year-old painter and sculptor who grew up in poverty in Washington.
LIVING
January 22, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The answering machine gives her away: "You have reached Barbie. I'm either grouting, gardening, or watching Law & Order . . . " Those are the fixations, in correct order, of Barbie Henig, a mosaic-maker, gardener, and crime-series fan from Ardmore who has been known to create some rather unorthodox mosaics - on bowling balls and basketballs - using grout-sealed shards of pottery and glass scavenged on an out-of-the-way beach in Ventnor. She calls herself a "shardist," which rhymes with artist, which raises a question: How, exactly, should we think of mosaics, that ancient practice of creating images or decorative designs from colored glass and stone?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The following review originally appeared during the 2008 Philadelphia Film Festival. Isaiah Zagar's art is all over Philadelphia's South Street corridor. And his restless spirit - and painful secrets - are all over In a Dream, a stunning, deeply personal documentary portrait by the muralist's youngest son, Jeremiah Zagar. Like the dazzling, colorful mosaics that Isaiah has pasted to buildings around town - crazy-quilt images of people (often including the artist himself), shards of shattered mirror, cracked crockery, wine bottles, bicycle wheels - his life has been kaleidoscopic, yet singularly focused.
NEWS
November 23, 2008 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The visionary moment that helped inspire a community-square project came after death in Iraq touched Doylestown. A routine morning jog capped by the sight of a flying bald eagle led a local businesswoman to think of a patriotic pin worn by one grieving mother and the dog tags around the neck of another. That moment last spring helped bring the jogger together with a mosaic artist and the mothers of two 26-year-old Doylestown Township servicemen who died within a week of each other.
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