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NEWS
May 13, 1986
I'm not surprised that the Moscow authorities have said very little about the nuclear accident. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if next year they said that it didn't happen at all. Dave B. Olim Ambler.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1986 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few years ago, the kitchen of the Japanese Embassy here ran out of Heinz tomato ketchup. In many of the world's largest cities, this sort of commodity can be obtained with relative ease. Such is not the case in the Soviet capital, as the Japanese knew. Off went a Telex to Helsinki, Finland, where a store that specializes in solving such problems was ready and waiting. Only one bottle could be found on short notice, but off it went, packed and labeled, on the next flight to Moscow, 650 miles away.
NEWS
December 13, 1987 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Soviet citizen held up the current issue of the weekly newspaper Nedelya and pointed to the cover photograph of Mikhail S. Gorbachev, broadly smiling, in Washington. "Probably, he didn't know what happened in the streets here this week," said the Soviet. He was not himself a dissident or potential emigre, but he was well aware of the violent squelching of demonstrations in Moscow during the "Mikhail and Ron" summit. But Gorbachev did know what happened in Moscow. During his hypnotic news conference Thursday evening in Washington, he was even asked about it - specifically, about what happened last Sunday.
NEWS
July 17, 1987
After slipping into Israel almost unnoticed this week, a Soviet delegation is breaking Moscow's 20-year diplomatic boycott of Israel with style. The leader of the delegation told Israeli listeners "Boker tov" (Hebrew for 'good morning') on the army radio station, and the visitors have talked nonstop with almost all the leading Israeli publications. But when it comes to diplomacy, and the underlying purpose of the visit, the Kremlin's agenda is murky. The Soviet foreign ministry insists that the delegation is concerned only with consular matters, like checking up on the Russian Orthodox Church's property in the Holy Land.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 prostitutes are working in Moscow, some of them students, a Soviet law-enforcement official was quoted as saying yesterday. In the daily Sovietskaya Rossiya newspaper, Lt. Col. E. T. Chaikovsky, chief of the Moscow criminal investigation department, appealed to the public for assistance in cracking down on prostitution. "In order to make a prostitute answer for it (her illegal activity), it is necessary to catch her red-handed at the moment of taking money," he said.
NEWS
March 7, 1986
Soviet Communist Party Congresses are usually full of wooden platitudes recited from approved texts. But Western attention has been riveted on the meetings of the 27th party congress as if it were the Superbowl. The reason: to see whether Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev really intends to overhaul his country's economy and politics or whether his rhetoric of radical reform only masks a policy of tinkering. There was no shortage of "watershed" rhetoric. The Soviet leader ticked off all the catch phrases of Moscow's think-tank experts on economic reform like market forces and financial incentives.
SPORTS
October 6, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Disgruntled forward Alexei Yashin flew from Ottawa to Moscow yesterday to practice with a team while he waits for the Senators to trade him. His agent, Mark Gander, said Yashin was tired of reading about himself in the local newspapers. "It will be easier for him to be in Russia," Gandler said. Ottawa suspended Yashin in early September when he failed to show up for training camp. He boycotted the Senators' camp because he wanted his contract renegotiated and has said he will never play for the team again.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathy Hettche said she was moved by the sadness in the eyes of the Soviet people. Jeff Prior said he took a taxi ride to a Moscow alley to sell some American clothes to a Soviet boy. Ron Karnaugh said he had trouble sleeping because dawn came to Moscow at 4 a.m. These three American swimmers, members of Kennett Square's Team Foxcatcher, were part of the 40-swimmer U.S. contingent that participated in the swimming competition at the...
NEWS
July 27, 1991
You might have been startled by Mikhail S. Gorbachev's remarks at the opening of a meeting of the Communist Party's Central Committee. Gorbachev pretty much advocated abandonment of the party's central beliefs, especially the doctrines of Marx and Lenin. He sounded pretty much like a misplaced Swedish Social Democrat with a Russian accent. This has caused a great flap among people who think about such things. It is remarkable to see one of the world's major political movements announcing that it is abandoning what it believes in. In this country, of course, it is only the announcing that startles us. Our Democratic Party, grown plump on PAC contributions even though it can't win national elections, has given up on opposing anything the Republicans propose, no matter how crazy.
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NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
You can't make this stuff up. No, you wouldn't want to make this stuff up about a presidential candidate who could wind up running this country. Donald Trump actually said yesterday that he hoped Russia had hacked into Hillary Clinton's email server and would now release 30,000 emails. In other words, the GOP candidate sanctioned cyber-spying by a foreign nation in order to influence an election in his favor. This just as U.S. intelligence agencies say they are highly confident - as are well-known cybersecurity firms - that it was Russian government spy agencies that hacked into the Democratic National Committee's emails, 20,000 of which were released the day before the convention with the clear intent of undercutting Clinton.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2016
Answer: Copenhagen, Denmark, and Edinburgh, Scotland. All three cities are at 55 degrees north latitude.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
Jack Bausman, 92, a Cold War-era correspondent and former Moscow bureau chief for the Associated Press, died Thursday at a hospital in Stamford, Conn., his daughter, Mary-Fred Bausman-Watkins, said. He had heart surgery in April and never fully recovered, she said. Mr. Bausman arrived in Moscow as the news agency's bureau chief in July 1968, about a month before the Soviet Union invaded Czechoslovakia. He also reported from Frankfurt, Germany, from Warsaw, Poland, and from Budapest, Hungary, during a four-decade career with the AP, including his four years in Moscow.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When Ukraine President Petro Poroshenko addressed a joint session of Congress last week, he called on members to support Ukrainian freedom and democracy. They stood and cheered. Ukrainians must "live free or die," the president said, using a slogan from the American Revolution to describe his struggle with "rebels" who have taken over the eastern regions of his country. In reality, these separatists are Russian proxies, whom the Kremlin armed and organized in an effort to drag Kiev back into Moscow's orbit.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Will Englund, Washington Post
MOSCOW - Alexei Navalny, the blogging scourge of corrupt Russian officials, may have been led off in handcuffs Thursday after being sentenced to five years in prison on dubious charges, but it turns out the charismatic protest leader still had some clout. Somebody in a position to do something about it must have decided that Navalny was more valuable - or less dangerous - as a free man than as an incarcerated one. So prosecutors in the city of Kirov went to court and told a judge he should be released until his appeals can be heard.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In the latest political show trial in Moscow, Alexei Navalny, the anticorruption activist and charismatic opposition leader, was sentenced to five years in jail - for corruption. Apparently there is no move too cynical for Russian leader and former KGB operative Vladimir Putin. Only last week a dead man - Sergei Magnitsky, a whistle-blower who was jailed and beaten to death in prison - was judged guilty of the very embezzlement scheme he had exposed (which was committed, in reality, by top government officials)
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Maria Danilova and Sean Yoong, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Moscow's main airport swarmed with media from around the globe Wednesday, but the man they were looking for - National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden - was nowhere to be seen. The mystery of the former spy's whereabouts only deepened a day after President Vladimir Putin said Snowden was in the transit area of Sheremetyevo Airport. In the airport were ordinary scenes of duty-free shopping, snoozing travelers, and tourists sipping coffee, but no trace of America's most famous fugitive.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | Associated Press
MOSCOW - Yes, he's at a Moscow airport, and no, you can't have him. Russian President Vladimir Putin gave the first official acknowledgment of the whereabouts of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden on Tuesday and promptly rejected U.S. pleas to turn him over. Snowden, who is charged with violating American espionage laws, fled Hong Kong over the weekend, touching off a global guessing game over where he went and frustrating U.S. efforts to bring him to justice. Putin said Snowden was in the transit zone of Sheremetyevo Airport and has not passed through Russian immigration, meaning he technically was not in Russia and thus was free to travel wherever he wanted.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Kathy Lally and Anthony Faiola, Washington Post
MOSCOW - Edward Snowden, sought on espionage charges after bringing secret U.S. surveillance programs to light, receded still further into the shadows Monday as the United States strenuously called on Russia to turn him over for prosecution. Snowden, 30, a former government contractor who has not been seen in public since he was said to have arrived in Moscow on Sunday after slipping out of Hong Kong, set off a flurry of diplomatic activity around the globe as frustrated U.S. officials tried to interrupt his flight to asylum.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Anthony Faiola, Washington Post
LONDON - A day after securing an end to the European Union's weapons embargo on Syria, Britain and France are facing criticism from Russia, and pressure at home and abroad, to show restraint before acting to arm the rebels seeking to oust Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Britain, along with France, scored a diplomatic victory in Paris on Monday, effectively blocking an attempt by other European nations to extend the regional embargo that has prevented them from sending weapons to help the Syrian opposition.
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