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Moses

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Move over, Charlton Heston: You are still the most famous Moses of all time, but Ben Kingsley is amply qualified to stand on the same pedestal with you. Before you roll the Red Sea over me, Mr. Heston, I hasten to add that you are still the definition of this towering role. But after you see Kingsley's interpretation of the lawgiver, I'm sure you'll like it as much as many television viewers will. Moses, a four-hour mini-series, will be shown in two parts on the TNT cable channel, at 8 p.m. Sunday and Monday.
NEWS
December 13, 1998 | By Jane R. Eisner, Editor of the Editorial Page
So, Moses is hot. Star, new Spielberg movie. Cover, Time magazine. Long profile, the New Yorker. Subject of many well-reviewed books by eminent scholars. I imagine him stirring from that other place, where our greatest and humblest heroes reside, and wondering what all the fuss could be about: Why me? Why now? Why again? Weren't Michelangelo and Charlton Heston enough? But even this outsized prophet, who overcame physical disability and the psychological scars of childhood abandonment to become God's greatest servant, liberator and law-giver, never could have fathomed the lessons he still could teach American popular culture.
SPORTS
April 9, 1986 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, Daily News Sports Writer
Your all-star center has impaired vision and is spending the remainder of the regular season pedaling a stationary bicycle, just in case he is able to see his way clear to participate in the playoffs. Your instant-offense guy off the bench has a hyperextended knee and is suiting up in street clothes. Your long-injured shooting guard still has sore feet, and also is recovering from groin surgery. What's a team to do? Well, if you're the Sixers, you try to hold the ship together with spit and baling wire while somehow managing to put together a five-game winning streak.
SPORTS
April 22, 2012 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the 400-meter hurdles contestants who took to the track at Franklin Field for the opening race of the Friday program at the 1976 Penn Relays was a tall and slender man wearing glasses, whom few people recognized by his face or his name. But Edwin Moses, a student at Morehouse College in Atlanta, was familiar with Franklin Field, having trained there in each of the two previous summers in the hours away from his work as an industrial engineering intern with Lukens Steel Co. of Coatesville.
NEWS
August 18, 2010 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
LAWYER AND ACTIVIST Charles W. Bowser was remembered as the "Moses of black politics" and a courageous and tenacious fighter for justice at his funeral yesterday. Scores of people from the legal and political arena - a former and a current member of Congress; three former Philadelphia mayors; a retired Commonwealth Court judge; a current and a former Common Pleas Court judge; and numerous lawyers and members of City Council attended the service at the Pinn Memorial Baptist Church, in Wynnefield.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rich and Michele Mendelson were among the first in line for the Tabernacle Experience, an Old Testament-inspired exhibit that's drawing the faithful and the curious to a grassy field in Winslow Township. "It was spiritual," Rich, a truck driver, says. "Enlightening," adds his wife, who teaches at a day care. Adjectives like those are why Debra Groller, a nondenominational Christian minister from Deptford, felt called to host this unusual attraction through Sunday at Camp Haluwasa, a Christian facility on Ehrke Road.
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Behold Bruce Feiler's optimism. You and your relatives, he says with conviction, can talk about religion and politics at Thanksgiving and survive. The best-selling author of several books connecting the biblical past to the present, Feiler says he understands it's a risky proposition. But he rejects the conventional wisdom that if you want to get to the pumpkin pie without inciting World War III, keep your opinions about health care, gay rights, abortion, nuclear energy, the bailout, the White House, and Fox News to yourself.
LIVING
March 31, 1993 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The name cards at 125 place settings suggested that this would be a Passover Seder different from most. "Ruth, Rosalie, Carol, Ruth, Renee, Adele, Leila, Margot, Hilda, Andrea, Dina, Hope, Gail, Kathy, Helen, Pearl," read a row of first names at one table. And shortly after 6 p.m. Monday, the women to whom those names belonged began to arrive in the spacious dining hall at Temple Beth Zion-Beth Israel in Center City. A few came clutching their family's best candlesticks.
NEWS
October 6, 1997 | By Lillian Weis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's quite a feat for any 13-year-old to stand in front of a crowd and chant from the Torah in Hebrew. But what is normally a struggle for most has been a labor of love and determination for Ian Geoffrey Amsterdam. Ian, who has Down syndrome, studied for about nine months to prepare for his bar mitzvah. As he underwent this important rite of passage into religious adulthood on Saturday, Ian led his congregation in prayer at Temple Emanuel in Cherry Hill. Ian's bar mitzvah was especially meaningful because it fell during the High Holidays, Rabbi Jerome P. David said.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Cary Moses, there was no other way out after he told on two fellow inmates at the Montgomery County Correctional Facility. So he left. That didn't work, either. Moses was found guilty Tuesday of escape after a two-day trial in which his attorney, Ray Roberts, argued that his client had no choice after being threatened by the inmates whom he fingered for drug use. "Here's one guy who had the guts to come forward and do something about it," Roberts said of his client.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Moses Pierce stood amid the shuffle of tourists and commuters outside City Hall, eager to engage passersby who rarely looked up from their cellphones. He didn't let "the devices," as he calls them, inhibit his job, though. Hello, ma'am. Can I help you get to where you're going today? Welcome to the park, my man. Please, remember for next time -- no smoking, all right?   For 25 years, Pierce has walked the streets and parks of Center City, a "traveling concierge," as he describes himself, as a member of the Center City District's Community Service Representative team.
NEWS
July 17, 2016
California (BMG **) Achieving what Radiohead's A Moon Shaped Pool couldn't, the seventh album by the SoCal pop-punk band - and first since coleader Tom DeLonge was replaced by Alkaline Trio guitarist Matt Skiba - has succeeded in pushing Canadian rapper Drake's Views off the top of the Billboard album chart. Proving . . . what, exactly? Certainly that the snarky, aging pop-punk band retains more audience share than might be expected, and that their less-ambitious-than-Green Day three-minute rips continue to appeal to both current and former suburban youths.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
Scores of people - many of them elderly, with small, rickety carts in tow - began lining both sides of 62d Street near Cedar Avenue in West Philly at 4 a.m. They sat on milk crates and boxes one Monday this month, waiting for hours for someone to bring them what they need most this holiday season: food. Philabundance truck driver Jackie Cooley Jr. pulled up shortly after noon - as he has every Monday for three years - and beeped his horn. The crowd cheered and parted. "We love you, Jackie!"
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
AFTER THE 76ERS had acquired Julius Erving before the 1976-77 season, the team went on a run of being eliminated in the NBA Finals three times and the Eastern Conference Finals twice in a six-year span. While those teams were composed of other star-level players such as Doug Collins, George McGinnis, Bobby Jones, Darryl Dawkins and Lloyd Free, to name a few, there was an ingredient missing. Billy Cunningham, who took over as head coach before the 1977-78 season, knew exactly what it was. "What we needed was that physical presence," Cunningham said yesterday.
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Columnist
I HAD TICKETS for Game 5 of the 1983 NBA Finals at the Spectrum. It was just before I got into the writing business full-time and nine years after I was supposed to see Moses Malone at Cole Field House. Caesar Alsop, my great friend from the University of Maryland who would become the Daily News sports editor, had been telling me stories about how this Moses was going to take the Terps to the Promised Land. C-Man grew up in Virginia and knew all about the man-child from his home state.
NEWS
September 15, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers were practicing for the start of the 1983 playoffs when coach Billy Cunningham approached Moses Malone in front of reporters and asked him: "How do you think the playoffs will go?" "Fo, fo, fo," Mr. Malone reportedly replied in regard to how many games the Sixers would need in each of the three series to sweep the playoffs and win the NBA championship. The Sixers actually needed one more game to go all the way, but the words uttered by Mr. Malone became a permanent part of the lexicon in Philadelphia and gave him legendary status alongside Julius Erving, Maurice Cheeks and other stars of the city's last NBA title team.
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
THE LEGEND goes like this: That once upon a time, a man named Moses Malone came upon this land and foresaw great things - not only the 1983 NBA championship for the Philadelphia 76ers, but historic domination for his team. The legend is wrapped up in one phrase, one bold prediction on the eve of the playoffs, indelible partly because of its sheer audacity and partly because of Malone's particular patois. One phrase: Fo', fo', fo'. Of course, most stories are never quite that simple and neither is this one. The basics are true.
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Too young. Too soon. Too sad. That's what crosses your mind first when you wake up on a Sunday morning and find out that Moses Malone has died at the age of 60. Way too young. It was a little more than two weeks ago that we lost Darryl Dawkins, the vibrant, backboard-shattering giant whose departure from the 76ers in 1982 made room for Malone to become the team's missing link to an NBA title. One enormous character gone at the age of 58 and now the lunch-pail legend that followed Chocolate Thunder to Philadelphia is no longer with us, either.
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | By Sarah Todd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The death of 76ers great Moses Malone rocked the sports world Sunday. A ferocious rebounder, the Hall of Famer known as the Chairman of the Boards was mourned far and wide. Former and current NBA players took to social media, released statements, and expressed grief over losing the three-time MVP who led the Sixers to their last NBA title in 1983. "I am extremely saddened to hear of Moses' passing this morning. This is extremely tough for me. I am completely in shock and words can't express the pain and loss I am feeling right now," Dominique Wilkins said in a statement.
SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
JULIUS ERVING, Charles Barkley, and Allen Iverson were among the former players who shared their thoughts on the passing of Moses Malone. Malone, who helped lead the Sixers to the 1983 NBA championship, died yesterday morning in his sleep in Norfolk, Va. He was 60. Doctor J tweeted that he was already dealing with the death of his high school coach at Roosevelt (N.Y.) High when he learned of Malone's passing. "Lost Coach Ray Wilson and friend Moses Malone this week," Erving wrote.
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