FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 6, 1994 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They come to dance, listen to music, be with friends and be themselves. On this cool autumn night, many of the teenagers, dressed in black and sporting an array of pierced parts and hats, gather in front of Breakers, a teen nightclub on Route 30 in the heart of Frazer's business district. It's Friday night, and that means alternative music at Breakers. Inside, white strobe lights blink and the music of Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Nine Inch Nails blares as the under-21 crowd gyrates and jumps and prepares to "mosh," a bruising form of slam dancing in which everyone thrashes against one another.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Despite all the negative chatter the issue of immigration generates, the fact is that Americans love the trial-and-error tragicomic saga of fresh-off-the-boat immigrants who try to fit like square pegs into America's round hole. The latest proof is the runaway success of the movie Borat. Before there was Borat, there was Taxi's Latka Gravas, Andy Kaufman's lovable mechanic of mysterious Eastern European descent. In between, there was, and for that matter is, Gogol Bordello, led by human-cannonball front man Eugene H?tz, perhaps best known for his role as Alex in the movie version of Everything Is Illuminated.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerry Mele is making the world safe for metal. As a storm of headbangers gathers in the parking lot, this new-age security guru addresses the force at the Star Lake Amphitheater here. Assembled to hear The Word are clean-cut guards who, in their neat polo shirts, look more as if they're ready for an Up With People audition than the onslaught of nearly 5,000 hard-core rock-and-rollers. "If people come over the barricades, I tell them I don't want their feet in somebody's face," Mele tells them in tough, gravelly New Yorkese.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | By Cheryl Squadrito, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Skid Row's show at the Spectrum Theater on Friday wasn't perfect, but then again, rock and roll isn't supposed to be. Thanks to a murky sound system, the otherwise entertaining performance was marred by a muddy mix that claimed guitars and bass and, sometimes, Sebastian Bach's vocals. The group - known for its high-energy shows and Bach's arrest record - began with the title track from its second effort, Slave to the Grind. From there, the 8,000 headbanging fans heard almost-thrash versions of songs such as "Big Guns" and "Makin' Mess," from Skid Row's self-titled first album, and newer tunes, such as "Creepshow" and "Monkey Business," that were raw and raunchy.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
The conversation of those who hang out at the Deptford Mall is peppered with slang. For the hapless shopper, who may be confused by what he or she overhears on a Friday night - or for the aspiring "mall rat," who wants to become more than just a "wannabe" - here is a by-no-means-complete dictionary of Deptford Mall-speak. Community puke (noun) An unknown, unattractive person, who has just passed a bench on which a group of mall rats is sitting. Dweeb or biff (noun). A nerd.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1995 | By Kira L. Billik, FOR THE INQUIRER
Faith No More is anything but predictable. No musical style, genre, or nuance is outside its realm of possibility. Jacks of all trades, master of all - the group dares audiences to accept it and couldn't care less if they don't. Such was the basis of its riotous, challenging show Monday night at the Tower Theater in support of its latest release, King For a Day . . . Fool For a Lifetime. Had a hankerin' for a country-esque ballad? The Bay Area quartet provided "Take This Bottle.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | Daily News wire services
TAMPA, Fla. Dead man found in ticketed car A man was found gagged and shot in the head in the back seat of a car that was ticketed at an expired parking meter, police said. The victim, Robert Enlow, had been reported missing from a halfway house where he was serving time for fraud. Enlow, 69, was in critical condition yesterday at a hospital. Restaurant manager Phil Carlile noticed a BMW with tinted windows parked out front when he opened shop Monday. Three hours and one parking ticket later, Carlile and a second parking meter officer looked inside the car and saw Enlow lying in the back seat, bound with duct tape, gagged and shot more than once.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
You would be forgiven for mistaking the return of Vanilla Ice as a sure sign that we are living in the end times, an augur of the pop apocalypse we all so richly deserve. F. Scott Fitzgerald's claim that there are no second acts in American life has been disproved before, but, really, the return of never-shoulda-beens like Ice is just the secondhand smoke of American life. In the early '90s, Ice had a blockbuster hit with "Ice Ice Baby," which featured the MC mouthing off over Queen and David Bowie's "Under Pressure.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1998 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Despite the dizzying transformations that rock has gone through in the last 40-plus years, one standard still applies: If it annoys parents, teachers and principals - that rock-and-roll rebel hat trick - then the kids will love it. Korn, whose new album, Follow the Leader (Epic), debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard charts, knows this all too well. Earlier this year, when a Michigan high school assistant principal suspended a student for wearing a T-shirt simply emblazoned with the band's name, Korn took action, threatening a multimillion-dollar lawsuit and milking it for all the media attention it was worth.
LIVING
February 12, 1995 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Valentine's Day is made for lovers. The candy companies churn out heart-shaped boxes full of sweets, Hallmark works overtime to make cards, lingerie chains make fancy frou-frou, and all the restaurants, flower shops and jewelers make a bundle. Luckily, Continuum Records has made something for the rest of us . . . the ones who've had our hearts ripped out of our rib cages and flung, still pumping, into the street, where they get run over by the Dumped truck and ground forever into the icy pavement of broken dreams.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2013
Rabbi Moshe Greenberg, 84, a religious educator who survived a brutal gulag in Siberia and secretly taught Judaism under an oppressive Soviet regime, has died in Israel. The Hasidic Chabad Lubavitch movement, of which Mr. Greenberg was a member, said he died Tuesday. Mr. Greenberg was born to a Hassidic family in Moldavia at a time when Jews were oppressed and Jewish practices were forbidden by the Soviets, Chabad said Thursday. At 14, he went to Tashkent in Uzbekistan to study Judaism at a secret Chabad seminary.
SPORTS
April 20, 2011 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Even in the best of times with the NFL, the annual announcement of the regular-season schedule ranks somewhere on the excitement scale between flossing and checking your engine oil. There is no mystery to the slate of opponents. With the slotted system the NFL put in place several years ago, the following season's opposition is known as soon as the last down of the regular season is recorded. For more than three months, we have known the Eagles would be scheduled to play, aside from their division rivals, the teams in the NFC West, the teams in the AFC East, and, because they won the division, the first-place teams from the NFC North and NFC South.
NEWS
February 21, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael "Micha" Moshe, 63, of Cherry Hill, a former Israeli soldier who came to South Jersey to live the American dream and developed an insurance business, died Feb. 12 of a stroke at Virtua Voorhees. Mr. Moshe moved his family from Israel to Cherry Hill in 1981, and then held different jobs for a decade until he started the health and life insurance company Moshe & Associates. Working in insurance let Mr. Moshe help people, which he enjoyed, his daughter Donna said. The business also allowed Mr. Moshe to discuss his life with his clients, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Despite all the negative chatter the issue of immigration generates, the fact is that Americans love the trial-and-error tragicomic saga of fresh-off-the-boat immigrants who try to fit like square pegs into America's round hole. The latest proof is the runaway success of the movie Borat. Before there was Borat, there was Taxi's Latka Gravas, Andy Kaufman's lovable mechanic of mysterious Eastern European descent. In between, there was, and for that matter is, Gogol Bordello, led by human-cannonball front man Eugene H?tz, perhaps best known for his role as Alex in the movie version of Everything Is Illuminated.
NEWS
October 30, 2005 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By midnight, everyone will know. For the 400,000 who ride SEPTA buses, trolleys and subways daily to jobs, classes, malls and doctors, the Halloween gong could mean trouble. Time to break out the bicycles, walking sneakers and car keys; time to find the nearest Regional Rail line; and, for some, time to be marooned at home. For 5,300 employees of two SEPTA unions, it would be time to march and wave picket signs, gut-check time as their wages and benefits were shut off. And for SEPTA management, it would be time to feel pressured - by the loss of riders who might never return, and by the chance of fouling political waters where the transit agency's long-term salvation might ultimately lie. Nearly a year of on-again, off-again labor talks - a mincing minuet now headed for the mosh pit - will culminate in a devastating strike by 12:01 a.m. tomorrow unless minds can meet by then.
NEWS
December 18, 2003 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid glowing accolades and optimistic cheer, acclaimed architect Moshe Safdie was introduced to Philadelphia yesterday as the design inspiration for the renovation and expansion of the Central Branch of the city's Free Library at 19th and Vine Streets. Safdie, a Boston-based architect who apprenticed with Louis I. Kahn in Philadelphia in the 1960s, was selected this fall after a competitive search in which the work of 39 designers was considered, said Kevin E. Vaughan, the library's associate director.
NEWS
November 13, 2003 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Architect Moshe Safdie, who recently completed widely praised libraries in Salt Lake City and Vancouver, was selected yesterday by the Free Library to design an addition capable of transforming the cluttered neoclassical palace on Logan Square into a modern intellectual and social hub for Philadelphia. Library director Elliot L. Shelkrot said board members picked the 65-year-old, Israeli-born architect for the $110 million project because of his ability to design welcoming, light-filled spaces that are modern in both appearance and function.
NEWS
July 29, 2003 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Perry Farrell's Lollapalooza brand debuted in 1991, it let out the angst-ridden howl of alterna-culture staking its claim to the mainstream. Borrowing the all-day carnival concept from European rock festivals, Lollapalooza served up a tattooed fruit basket that succeeded well enough to lead to its own demise. The strength-in-numbers concept spawned niche-marketed summer tours from H.O.R.D.E. to Ozzfest to Warped, and Lolla's mixed bag could no longer compete. The Lollapalooza that played the Tweeter Center on Sunday, the first since 1997, has been retooled for the marketplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
You would be forgiven for mistaking the return of Vanilla Ice as a sure sign that we are living in the end times, an augur of the pop apocalypse we all so richly deserve. F. Scott Fitzgerald's claim that there are no second acts in American life has been disproved before, but, really, the return of never-shoulda-beens like Ice is just the secondhand smoke of American life. In the early '90s, Ice had a blockbuster hit with "Ice Ice Baby," which featured the MC mouthing off over Queen and David Bowie's "Under Pressure.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1998 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Despite the dizzying transformations that rock has gone through in the last 40-plus years, one standard still applies: If it annoys parents, teachers and principals - that rock-and-roll rebel hat trick - then the kids will love it. Korn, whose new album, Follow the Leader (Epic), debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard charts, knows this all too well. Earlier this year, when a Michigan high school assistant principal suspended a student for wearing a T-shirt simply emblazoned with the band's name, Korn took action, threatening a multimillion-dollar lawsuit and milking it for all the media attention it was worth.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|