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Moshulu

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June 20, 1996 | by Christian Ewell, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff writer Stu Bykofsky contributed to this report
When you spend $1.1 million on a boat, the last thing you worry about is bureaucratic clutter. Especially when you spend another $6 million transforming it into a restaurant, as Eli Karetny has. So when the city rejected the developer's zoning permit application for his long-awaited Moshulu restaurant, he didn't panic. He appealed. With support from a Queen Village neighborhood group, Karetny said he expected his restaurant to get its variance next Wednesday, when it's scheduled for a zoning hearing.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
The Moshulu, a longtime fixture on Penn's Landing, left port on Tuesday escorted by tug boats to a temporary resting spot in Camden near the Walt Whitman Bridge. The ship, which has been docked in Philadelphia for 14 years and has served as a restaurant, is scheduled to be moved later to an undetermined permanent location on the Delaware, where it is to undergo restoration as a sailing ship. The project is expected to take about two years. The restoration is to be financed by Specialty Restaurants Inc. of Anaheim, Calif.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | By Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
First the Flyers and the 76ers. Now the Moshulu may be moving to New Jersey. A once-proud sailing vessel in the grain trade and winner of the last great "Grain Race"from Australia to Europe in 1939, the Moshulu has been docked on the Delaware at Penn's Landing as a restaurant ship since 1976. It has been closed and boarded since a four-alarm fire last July 11 that fire officials said started when a bare light bulb ignited paper products in a storage area of the hold. Some 200 patrons fled the blaze and six people, including three firefighters, were slightly injured.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Broken, charred and weather-beaten, she was not the gleaming beauty who first anchored at the foot of Chestnut Street 14 years ago, but this grand old lady of Penn's Landing left Philadelphia yesterday with her manila-colored masts straight and proud and glided gracefully down the Delaware River. It was farewell for the Moshulu. A small crowd of well-wishers, many of whom had waited hours to bid goodbye, looked on quietly from a balcony as the ship's blue-carpeted gangplank was finally pulled in at 3:30 p.m. and two red-decked tugboats nudged up close to lead the 394-foot barkentine away.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Dick Pothier and Michael B. Coakley, Inquirer Staff Writers Inquirer staff writer Tom Torok contributed to this article
A smoky four-alarm fire erupted late last night aboard the Moshulu, the grand old restaurant ship on the Philadelphia riverfront, plunging its dining room into darkness and sending 200 patrons scrambling for the gangplanks. The restaurant manager and at least two guests were injured fleeing the huge square-rigger, afloat in 35 feet of water in the Delaware River near the foot of Chestnut Street at Penn's Landing. A firefighter also was injured. Fire officials initially feared that the steel-hulled vessel, perhaps the best-known landmark on the city's downtown waterfront, might sink, but they later said it appeared in no danger of going down.
FOOD
September 29, 1996 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Even when it floundered, I never stopped liking the original Moshulu. Admittedly, there were moments during the floating restaurant's 14-year stand at Penn's Landing when I shuddered at gritty or threadbare upholstery or sniffed at less than appetizing aromas wafting from the galley. But whatever it was that I didn't love about that Moshulu was always outweighed by the way I felt just stepping on deck. The place oozed romance. For the hour or two that it took to eat a meal or sip a tall drink, I could pretend that I was sailing toward some exotic port, the wind in my hair and the sea spray on my face.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the frozen cold of winter, when the Delaware is a river of jagged ice and melted snow, when bitter winds whip the waterfront and most other geese have long since flown South, these two - a sedentary couple - still make their home at the Moshulu. And with the help of friends like Willie Edney, they remain geese of ample girth - even now, after the grand old restaurant ship has been closed for six months and its daily kitchen handouts have dried up. "Usually I bring a loaf of wheat bread.
NEWS
July 27, 1996
Those who enjoyed sitting aboard the 1980s pre-fire Moshulu restaurant with its rough-hewn deck boards, mediocre food and spectacular view will love the luxurious $10 million, turn-of-the-century rehab version christened by the mayor this week. Anchored on South Columbus Boulevard, the newly restored Moshulu is a potential tourism bonanza - not as a restaurant per se (we haven't sampled the food yet) but on the promise that the restored ship will give the bustling, club-dominated waterfront a more historic feel.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | By Michael B. Coakley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Moshulu, the grand old four-masted square-rigger that was extensively damaged by a fire on Philadelphia's riverfront last summer, may be sailing for new waters, according to a spokesman for the restaurant chain that owns it. Specialty Restaurants Inc. of Anaheim, Calif., plans to refit the Moshulu, a Penn's Landing landmark since 1976, and sail it to a new home. Possible moorings being considered include Jersey City, Wilmington, San Francisco and San Diego, the spokesman said yesterday.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Entertainer Christopher Manos was on the deck of the Moshulu in 1989, singing a song called "Bad Night in Philly," when he stopped in mid-note to announce the ship was on fire. About 200 patrons of the restaurant ship anchored at Penn's Landing scrambled to safety. The four-alarm blaze, started by a naked light bulb that ignited paper products in the hold, wrecked the historic iron barkentine. But the Moshulu, which had survived occupation by the Nazis and many owners and occupations over its 96-year history, would survive the fire.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kouny Vilayphanh, who came to this country from Laos 33 years ago when he was 6, has a crystal-clear reason for his participation in Philadelphia's Southeast Asian Dragon Boat Festival, held Saturday at the marina at Penn's Landing. Vilayphanh, whose dragon boat team was affiliated with a Lao temple in South Philadelphia, said he wanted to keep Lao traditions and culture alive, especially among the young. "We're losing that day by day," he said. The Dragon Boat Festival was part of an active day along the Delaware River waterfront, despite cloudy skies that barely let the sun peek though for a few minutes at a time.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
Around midday recently at Spruce Street Harbor Park on Penn's Landing, families picnicked along the edge of the promenade, young adults and children swung lightly in hammocks or played games, and couples sat side by side reading in Adirondack chairs shaded under the trees tinseled with color-changing LED lights. Spruce Street Harbor Park was created by the Delaware River Waterfront Corp. and Groundswell Design Group with a $310,000 grant from the nonprofit coalition ArtPlace America.
FOOD
September 13, 2013 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Not since Philadelphia's Great Steakhouse Rush of 2008-2009 has Center City seen the luxe grandeur of Ocean Prime , which opened this week at 15th and Sansom Streets (124 S. 15th St., 215-563-0163), a $5 million build-out of the former Roy's. This is the 10th Ocean Prime for restaurateur Cameron Mitchell, who owns about 20 restaurants nationwide. Entrees start at $27 for chicken and top at $47 for twin lobster tails. Opens 4 p.m. daily.   Siggie is back Old-timers may remember Helen Sigel Wilson, one of the city's most decorated amateur golfers of the 1940s and 1950s, who made her living with the restaurants Helen Sigel Wilson's in Center City and L'Auberge in Wayne.
FOOD
January 5, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Chef Mark Berenato's first solo restaurant - a rustic, balconied BYOB in Haddonfield's Shoppes at 116 - carries the name da Soli , Italian for "on my own. " There seems to be a sly undercurrent there. Until last year, Berenato was chef at Tre Famiglia , a half-mile away up Haddon Avenue, and the breakup was not pretty. (Tre Famiglia actually hung a banner on its facade to disavow any connection between the restaurants.) At da Soli (116 Kings Highway East, Haddonfield, 856-429-2399)
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By STEPHANIE FARR & REGINA MEDINA, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
FROM FLYERS fans who held their own Boston Tea Party on the Moshulu to aging veterans who held tight to their beers at a South Philly pub, Philadelphians celebrated yesterday what they celebrate best - victory - not over a team or a city, but over a single man. No parade will be held to honor this moment and no trophies or rings awarded, but the residents of the birthplace of freedom took great comfort in knowing that freedom's enemy - Osama bin...
NEWS
February 4, 2011 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Marty Grims was looking to open a suburban branch of his renowned White Dog Cafe in University City, he found what appeared to be a perfect location at the western edge of downtown Wayne. Not only was the affluent Delaware County suburb the epicenter of a mini restaurant renaissance - where diners didn't blink at forking over $40 for a prime cut of steak - but compared with his original location on narrow Sansom Street, Grims said, Wayne offered "a plethora of parking. " That depends on your definition of plethora . Plagued by two years of delays, the White Dog Cafe was one of the most eagerly awaited restaurants on the Main Line.
NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Joanne Aitken and David B. Brownlee
We share the gratitude of maritime enthusiasts, preservationists, and design buffs for philanthropist H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest's gift enabling the SS United States Conservancy to purchase and rescue the fastest ocean liner ever built. Now it's up to Philadelphians to figure out how to keep this extraordinary combination of beauty and technological prowess on the Delaware, where it has berthed since 1996. The conservancy is looking for a public-private partnership to develop the ship as a museum with other functions; hotel, restaurant, and conference center come to mind.
NEWS
July 15, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The beach is a family place. It's true when you plant that umbrella in the sand and send the little ones off on a tear, all lathered up to plunge into the surf. And it's also true when it comes to restaurants - both for those seeking the perfect seaside meal, and for those doing the cooking. So I'm glad to report that restaurants owned and inspired by families are alive and well at the Jersey Shore. Yes, the big money these last few years has been pouring into the new casino restaurants in Atlantic City, as well as Moshulu owner Marty Grims' growing stable of snazzy grown-up eateries.
NEWS
May 18, 2007 | By Alan Jaffe FOR THE INQUIRER
Longtime visitors remember Wida's, a mainstay built in the 1920s that in more recent years billed itself as "an old-fashioned seashore hotel like grandmother used to frequent. " Well, grandma, Wida's is gone. But unlike the island's cedar-shingled bungalows that were torn down and replaced with vinyl-sided seamonsters, Wida's has undergone a face-lift, an update, and a name change. Say hello to Daddy O. Martin Grims, the restaurateur who owns the Moshulu and several Main Line bistros, has turned the old Brant Beach structure into a 22-room boutique hotel and dining room aimed at the hip, urbane patron.
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