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October 7, 1986
Janine Wedel's "The church's influence in Poland is political" (Op-ed Page, Sept. 27) is admittedly an anthropologist's look at the situation in Poland. Ms. Wedel is unwittingly describing the perennial work of the church throughout the world against ignorance and concupiscence, Poland no exception. She fails to realize: "It is impossible without Christ," in the words of Pope John Paul II, "to understand the history of the people who have passed or are passing through this land" of Poland.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
To many Polish American Catholics in South Jersey, St. Joseph's is the mother church. Their love for her endures like the New Hampshire granite of which the majestic edifice at 10th and Liberty Streets in Camden was constructed nearly a century ago. The Whitman Park neighborhood has frayed almost beyond recognition, and church membership has fallen to less than a quarter of its mid-20th-century peak of nearly 4,000 families. But St. Joe's will likely be filled next Sunday as the parish celebrates its 120th anniversary.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
As Bishop S.C. Madison, who also goes by the title of "Sweet Precious Daddy Madison," made his way through the congregation at the United House of Prayer for All People, money was thrust at him from all sides. "Here, Sweet Daddy. Over here," shouted one woman who simply wanted the bishop to touch her hand. Looking at this unabashed admiration of Madison last night from close to 2,000 people who packed the church, at 16th and Fitzwater streets, it was hard to believe there are deep dissensions within this South Philadelphia church.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The charges against Msgr. William J. Lynn are narrow: that the former Archdiocese of Philadelphia official endangered children by letting two priests live or work in parishes despite signs they might abuse minors. But the case prosecutors finished presenting Thursday stretched beyond those confines. Day after day in Courtroom 304 of the city's Criminal Justice Center, the church itself seemed to be on trial. Over eight weeks, jurors saw a parade of witnesses and close to 2,000 documents, some decades old, that detailed what bishops, pastors priests, and church officials knew and did about Philadelphia-area priests suspected of abusing children.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
Eleven members of the troubled Church of the Lord Jesus Christ of the Apostolic Faith have been charged in connection with a bloody brawl at the church last month. Charges against the 11 range from aggravated assault to conspiracy. Ten of the suspects gave themselves up at the South Detective Division, 24th and Wolf streets, yesterday. The suspects agreed to surrender after an investigation began of charges made by Kevin Brooks, 25, and several other men, who complained they were set upon inside the church at 22nd and Bainbridge streets last Feb. 23, beaten, kicked and thrown out of the building.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
After only three years of existence, the African American Catholic Congress is experiencing the same type of pains common to many established churches hundreds of years older. Political battles, philosophical differences, ego clashes and even death threats have befallen the fledgling church. Some members have already left the mother church, Imani Temple at 48th Street and Baltimore Avenue, to follow its first pastor, the Rev. Randolph H. Caines Jr., while others have opted to stay with the new minister, the Rev. Rose Vernell.
NEWS
December 15, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was once known as "Little Ukraine," a swath of North Philadelphia along Franklin Street, north of Spring Garden Street and south of Girard Avenue. Others might have called it "East Poplar" or Northern Liberties. But for Slavic immigrants, it had the ethnic resonance of South Philly or Chinatown. It was where neighbors spoke Ukrainian, where shop signs were written in the Cyrillic alphabet. And there was the cathedral - St. Mary's, informally, to earlier generations; now the Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
NEWS
June 6, 1994 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Showing a mixture of frustration and defiance, about 50 people stood on the white steps of St. Peter Claver Church at 12th and Lombard Streets yesterday morning, vowing to keep the historically black church functioning as a place of worship. Bolstered by song and prayer - and occasionally using harsh language that denounced Philadelphia's Catholic leaders as "racist" and "sinners" - black and white worshipers gathered at 9:30 in the morning, not knowing if they would be locked out of the building.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Marc Meltzer contributed to this report
Clara Ballard, a devoted churchwoman and minister's wife for more than 65 years, will be remembered Saturday at services in West Philadelphia, where she lived. Ballard, who often reached out to help children caught up in troubled situations, died Monday. She was 90. "Her outreach to people was amazing," said her husband of 69 years, the Rev. Dr. Marion O. Ballard. "She could meet people for the first time, and her demeanor was just like she had known them forever. " The clergyman held the pulpit at Tindley Temple and other Methodist churches during an era when African-American ministers were fighting for recognition and better treatment of the black community.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By John P. Martin and Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writers
After calling nearly 50 witnesses and presenting close to 1,900 documents over eight weeks, prosecutors on Thursday rested their case in the landmark trial involving child sex abuse by Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests. The team of district attorneys ended by letting jurors handle what they contend is the closest thing to a smoking gun in the case: a tattered gray folder that had been hidden in a locked safe at archdiocesan offices for more than a decade. Inside were handwritten and typed records, including a list that Msgr.
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NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
To many Polish American Catholics in South Jersey, St. Joseph's is the mother church. Their love for her endures like the New Hampshire granite of which the majestic edifice at 10th and Liberty Streets in Camden was constructed nearly a century ago. The Whitman Park neighborhood has frayed almost beyond recognition, and church membership has fallen to less than a quarter of its mid-20th-century peak of nearly 4,000 families. But St. Joe's will likely be filled next Sunday as the parish celebrates its 120th anniversary.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The charges against Msgr. William J. Lynn are narrow: that the former Archdiocese of Philadelphia official endangered children by letting two priests live or work in parishes despite signs they might abuse minors. But the case prosecutors finished presenting Thursday stretched beyond those confines. Day after day in Courtroom 304 of the city's Criminal Justice Center, the church itself seemed to be on trial. Over eight weeks, jurors saw a parade of witnesses and close to 2,000 documents, some decades old, that detailed what bishops, pastors priests, and church officials knew and did about Philadelphia-area priests suspected of abusing children.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By John P. Martin and Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writers
After calling nearly 50 witnesses and presenting close to 1,900 documents over eight weeks, prosecutors on Thursday rested their case in the landmark trial involving child sex abuse by Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests. The team of district attorneys ended by letting jurors handle what they contend is the closest thing to a smoking gun in the case: a tattered gray folder that had been hidden in a locked safe at archdiocesan offices for more than a decade. Inside were handwritten and typed records, including a list that Msgr.
NEWS
March 7, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
HARRIETT MARGARET Bates Urquhart, a pillar of Holy Temple Holiness Church, a strong advocate for the role of women in the church and founder of a successful scholarship program, died Feb. 26. She was 84 and lived in Chestnut Hill. Harriett also was active in the Apostolic Faith Churches of God Inc., in which she served as financial secretary under three presiding bishops, including her late husband, Bishop Abraham Urquhart. She held the title of "mother" in her church for more than 60 years, and was dedicated to supporting her husband in his work as a church leader.
NEWS
December 15, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was once known as "Little Ukraine," a swath of North Philadelphia along Franklin Street, north of Spring Garden Street and south of Girard Avenue. Others might have called it "East Poplar" or Northern Liberties. But for Slavic immigrants, it had the ethnic resonance of South Philly or Chinatown. It was where neighbors spoke Ukrainian, where shop signs were written in the Cyrillic alphabet. And there was the cathedral - St. Mary's, informally, to earlier generations; now the Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Marc Meltzer contributed to this report
Clara Ballard, a devoted churchwoman and minister's wife for more than 65 years, will be remembered Saturday at services in West Philadelphia, where she lived. Ballard, who often reached out to help children caught up in troubled situations, died Monday. She was 90. "Her outreach to people was amazing," said her husband of 69 years, the Rev. Dr. Marion O. Ballard. "She could meet people for the first time, and her demeanor was just like she had known them forever. " The clergyman held the pulpit at Tindley Temple and other Methodist churches during an era when African-American ministers were fighting for recognition and better treatment of the black community.
NEWS
July 15, 1995 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Edna M. Trapp, a mainstay at Thankful Baptist Church and a leader in Baptist organizations throughout the region, died Wednesday. She was 84 and lived in West Mount Airy. Trapp was married for 53 years to the Rev. Dr. Harrison J. Trapp, pastor of Thankful Baptist Church. He died in November 1987. For many years, Trapp, the former Edna Murphy, was a substitute teacher in the Philadelphia public schools. But most of her time was consumed taking leadership roles not only in her husband's church, but also in numerous state and national Baptist organizations.
NEWS
June 6, 1994 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Showing a mixture of frustration and defiance, about 50 people stood on the white steps of St. Peter Claver Church at 12th and Lombard Streets yesterday morning, vowing to keep the historically black church functioning as a place of worship. Bolstered by song and prayer - and occasionally using harsh language that denounced Philadelphia's Catholic leaders as "racist" and "sinners" - black and white worshipers gathered at 9:30 in the morning, not knowing if they would be locked out of the building.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
Eleven members of the troubled Church of the Lord Jesus Christ of the Apostolic Faith have been charged in connection with a bloody brawl at the church last month. Charges against the 11 range from aggravated assault to conspiracy. Ten of the suspects gave themselves up at the South Detective Division, 24th and Wolf streets, yesterday. The suspects agreed to surrender after an investigation began of charges made by Kevin Brooks, 25, and several other men, who complained they were set upon inside the church at 22nd and Bainbridge streets last Feb. 23, beaten, kicked and thrown out of the building.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
As Bishop S.C. Madison, who also goes by the title of "Sweet Precious Daddy Madison," made his way through the congregation at the United House of Prayer for All People, money was thrust at him from all sides. "Here, Sweet Daddy. Over here," shouted one woman who simply wanted the bishop to touch her hand. Looking at this unabashed admiration of Madison last night from close to 2,000 people who packed the church, at 16th and Fitzwater streets, it was hard to believe there are deep dissensions within this South Philadelphia church.
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