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Mother Nature

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NEWS
April 26, 1994 | Photographs for The Inquirer by Joan Fairman Kanes
It's a lot easier being green when someone makes it fun. From puppet shows to a book sale, everything at Narberth Park on Saturday revolved around Earth Day, with the Narberth Civic Association setting up booths from noon to 4 p.m. Dozens of children and their parents took part in activities centered on environmental themes. Borough officials were on hand to distribute recycling literature.
NEWS
April 28, 2003
SARS has arrived. People wearing masks to protect themselves is laughable. A virus is a hundred times smaller than a bacteria, so the mask blocks the virus from inhalation about 0.001 percent of the time. Why is it here? Where did it come from? Answer: Overpopulation and the mysterious bowels of nature. Nature senses and reacts to its environment. If there are too many living creatures, it will send forth a system (a disease) to relieve and correct the problem. Since Adam and Even started the human race eons ago, the number of humans has exploded on this finite globe.
NEWS
March 9, 1996
Dear God, We don't mean to tattle and get YOU so angry that you REALLY turn Philadelphia into Buffalo or International Falls, but could you maybe send Mother Nature to a parenting class or something? She's been real mean to us this winter and just won't seem to quit. To tell the truth, she's letting some of her bad kids - Snow, Sleet, Ice and Cold - run wild in our streets. Could you maybe ask her to send them on vacation - at least until next winter - and let Warm Sun and Flowers come out and play?
NEWS
February 2, 1996
Gov. Ridge is playing politics, trying to jawbone the feds into more generous aid for the disaster of the Great Blizzard and its meltdown floods. The thing is, he's mostly right. Ridge already got into a pretty public snit - if a bit prematurely - with President Clinton and the Federal Emergency Management Agency about assistance. He now is careful to say that FEMA is working hard to help. FEMA administers the possible federal help when Mother Nature kicks citizens around in a big-time way. The rub is FEMA's traditional position of "no dough for snow.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Matthew Schofield, McClatchy Newspapers
POPLAR ISLAND, Md. - Eighteen years ago, Justin Callahan took a small boat into the Chesapeake Bay to study the last remaining bits of what had been a wildlife paradise. Bobbing above what once was a miles-long island that had eroded to a couple of tiny pieces of dirt, he had no way of knowing the scale of the plan that the Army Corps of Engineers was hatching. It was some plan, inviting comparisons to the Titanic in terms of engineering hubris and to Jurassic Park in terms of one-upping the natural world.
SPORTS
June 15, 1990 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
At sopping wet Veterans Stadium last night, with only one hour left in Flag Day, the umpires hoisted a white one. We surrender. It's raining too hard. It's not going to stop soon enough. Go home. Get some sleep. Come back Friday for two, beginning at 5:35. Phillies manager Nick Leyva, for one, had received better news. His team held a 2-0 lead over the Chicago Cubs in the top of the fifth and the game was two outs away from becoming official when crew chief Terry Tata waved for the grounds crew at 9:04.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | by Jean McGillicuddy, For the Daily News
We asked Hannah Hogan, president and designer for Snipes Nursery in Morrisville, Pa., to share some ways to spice up the holidays using materials provided by Mother Nature. 1. Mini Christmas trees. Spruce up your home with small potted evergreen trees - the kind you can buy in almost any supermarket. Tie a generous bow around the pot and trim branches with miniature ornaments or a garland of stars. "Use a mirror on the table as a dish underneath the tree and its effect is doubled," said Hogan.
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | By Tara Dooley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For federal employees itching to get back on the job after more than three weeks on furlough, two snow days in a row were anything but a welcome relief from the daily grind. "I had cabin fever for the last three weeks," said Larry Teller, an administrative aide in the Environmental Protection Agency's Philadelphia office. "Last week I was going bananas because I had run out of chores," said Teller, who lives in Haddonfield. "I mean, how many chores can you do? So I was looking forward tremendously to be back to work Monday.
NEWS
December 4, 2002
The Bush administration's assault on environmental protection reaches an appalling new high - or low - with the U.S. Forest Service's proposal to essentially gut 20-year-old management planning rules for deciding the most appropriate uses of the nation's 192 million acres of national forest. The proposal, to become effective in 90 days, will "better harmonize the environmental, social and economic benefits" of the forests, the Forest Service said in a press release. That's bureaucratic gibberish for eroding safeguards under the National Environmental Policy Act that protect fish and wildlife.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | By Heather Moore, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Unlike Monday's snowy surprise, yesterday brought a taste of the tropics - 85 degrees and sunny, most everyone running around in shades, sandals, bikinis and swimming trunks. So went the April Fools' joke played by Sandy Roberts' kindergarten class at Buckingham Elementary School. Youngsters tricked the already-confused Mother Nature by having a beach day. With the heat turned up and the Beach Boys playing, the children were delighted with the irony. On Monday, Julia Ciccone, 6, built a snowman with her sister.
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NEWS
March 24, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
PHILLY'S POLAR vortex-ish temperatures rose this week to just over freezing and in time for spring, so thanks, Mother Nature. But who do we thank for a litigation-lovin' homeless woman in L.A.? Or the tenacious reporters working at In Touch Weekly ? Or the utter lack of Bieber news in this column? Don't you know Temporary Tattle doesn't need your thanks, just your undivided attention in Celebrityville? Yesterday Jo Anne Vandegriff , a self-described homeless woman living in L.A., has filed a lawsuit against Halle Berry , Amanda Bynes , Armie Hammer and Disney . She admits the filing is a ploy to pitch her 2,000-page Civil War romance miniseries, "Heaven's Angels.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Hurricane Sandy hit the Jersey Shore a year ago today, the wetlands-monitoring equipment of Tracy Quirk, an Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University researcher, was in its path. If the storm washed everything away, two years of painstaking work - not to mention hours of slogging through marsh muck in hip waders to install the devices - would be compromised. She'd have to start over to get continuous, long-term data. The equipment, it turned out, did more than survive.
NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I started gardening to get closer to Mother Nature, but now I hate her. Perhaps hate is too strong a word. Let's just say that we're frenemies. Because it turns out that Mother Nature is the ultimate mean girl. Let me explain. A few weeks ago, I planted and mulched a large perennial garden, which took five days of hard labor and was worth every minute. I had no idea how much I would love this garden, which was lush, fragrant, and colorful, blooming with purple hyssop, blue plumbago, pink roses, yellow and pink coneflower, black-eyed Susans, lavender, and daises.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Rema Rahman, Associated Press
One man's passion for planting has led to the creation of the Pohatcong Native Arboretum in Bergen County, an American Indian-inspired nature sanctuary nearly 11 years in the making, where a garden of trees and plants native to northwest New Jersey is set for public display. Creator and founder Anthony Pasquini said he was still fine-tuning the site in the days leading up to Tuesday's dedication ceremony, which will mark its public opening. Pasquini said his work planting and designing the arboretum is done and that he hopes to hand over maintenance of the site to the community.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Celebrate spring, knowing that a warm, sunny day can be followed by a frigid, cloudy one. Don't be tricked into planting too soon. For most flowering annuals, as well as vegetables like tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, beans and squash, wait until the last frost date, close to Mother's Day (May 12), give or take a week depending on your planting zone. Cool-weather crops such as peas, beets, lettuce, broccoli, and cabbage can be planted outside anytime now. Start seeds indoors and out. You were planning to buy all your transplants?
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman and Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writers
The skies might not have been, but the consensus among golfers Sunday at the Pennsauken Country Club was clear: The weather forecasters had lied. Through last week, meteorologists predicted a springlike, midwinter gift would descend on the Philadelphia region for the weekend: blue skies, plenty of sun, temperatures in the mid-60s. Accordingly, golfers who hadn't touched their clubs in weeks, if not months, swarmed the Pennsauken course, reserving tee times days in advance. By Friday, it had been booked for Saturday and Sunday through 2 p.m. - "unheard of in January," said Bryan Garrison, an assistant professional at the club.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Matthew Schofield, McClatchy Newspapers
POPLAR ISLAND, Md. - Eighteen years ago, Justin Callahan took a small boat into the Chesapeake Bay to study the last remaining bits of what had been a wildlife paradise. Bobbing above what once was a miles-long island that had eroded to a couple of tiny pieces of dirt, he had no way of knowing the scale of the plan that the Army Corps of Engineers was hatching. It was some plan, inviting comparisons to the Titanic in terms of engineering hubris and to Jurassic Park in terms of one-upping the natural world.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | Associated Press
NEWBERRY, Mich. - Rain is lending a hand to crew members who are battling a wildfire that has consumed 31.6 square miles of forest in the eastern port of Michigan's sparsely populated Upper Peninsula. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources said Sunday that the fire near Newberry is about 47 percent contained. The agency says it now estimates the fire has covered 20,255 acres, down slightly from Saturday's figure. Spokesman Dean Wilson says that's based on more accurate measurements.
SPORTS
August 15, 2011 | Associated Press
WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. - Marcos Ambrose should be on pins and needles. He says he's not. "No, not at all," Ambrose said Sunday after NASCAR postponed the Sprint Cup race at Watkins Glen International. "It keeps me relaxed. You can't fight the weather, so I just worry about stuff you can control. " Steady rain began just when the race was scheduled to start at 1 p.m. and did not abate in time for track crews to dry the 2.45-mile racing surface. They did give it a shot with jet driers that got the front straightaway nearly race-ready, but a second front moved in. The race is now scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. Monday, but rain also is in the forecast in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York.
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Take a hat, lather on the sunscreen, and lose the flip-flops - this year, the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education has decided to make you hike to its annual summer outdoor sculpture exhibition. It's an unchallenging ramble along the center's Widener Trail, as it turns out, through lovely, sun-dappled woods, open meadows, and an unexpected pine grove, with birds and other wildlife your only company. Even better, the show, "Facts and Fables: Stories of the Natural World," is the first one I've seen here (or at the center's Second Site, a former farm located a mile or so away)
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