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Motion Sickness

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NEWS
July 27, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
What's worse to hear from the back seat than "Mommy, I have to go to the bathroom"? It's, "Pull the car over to the side, Daddy, I'm gonna be carsick. " It must be vacation season. From boats, planes and cars comes the misery of motion sickness. As a seasick victim once growled from the side of a boat, "When it hit, I was afraid I was going to die. After awhile, I was afraid I wasn't. " Dr. Anthony Sherman, who practices general internal medicine at Pennsylvania Hospital in Center City, explains that motion sickness results when there is a mismatch of clues coming in from your body's various senses, the inner ear, the eyes; and other information - such as your knowledge of where your body is in space.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | From MICHAEL LACING
OH BABY After seeing the full-page nude shot of Drew Barrymore in the current issue of Vanity Fair, e.t. phoned home and said he may stick around a little longer. LOVE THY NEIGHBOR The New York Rangers not only choked in the playoffs but didn't get Eric Lindros. The Yankees and Mets both stink. Boy, it doesn't get any better than this. OPEN BOOK At the recent American Medical Association convention, doctors discussed whether to post fees on the door. If successful, lawyers may announce whether they live under a big rock or a little rock.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Karl Neumann, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Cruising has gained tremendous popularity among leisure travelers in recent years. But many others are leery of stepping aboard, fearing that they will suffer mal de mer - seasickness. Everyone has cures for motion sickness. Folk medicine calls for eating ginger root and olives. Ships' bartenders recommend either brandy and port, or creme de menthe with bitters. But, as always, the best medicine is an ounce of prevention. Today, many seagoers wear wristbands to prevent motion sickness.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a reporter aboard the "Vomit Comet," I thought my job seemed easy enough: to make sure NASA's photographer got a good shot of the two students from Rowan University doing an experiment on the flight, take mental notes, and follow the rules to avoid motion sickness. Rule No. 1 was to keep your head steady. Rule No. 2 was to avert your eyes from anyone else throwing up. But before I knew it, Rowan senior Bill McCorkle was using his airsickness bag, and his partner, D.J. Kephart, had asked me to take over.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
HOME TRUTHS Dan Quayle take note: Sixty-three percent of respondents to a recent survey don't expect American families to return to the traditional values of the 1950s. In addition, 55 percent of 1,009 adults surveyed by the Barna Research Group of Glendale, Calif., said that in the near future, "adults will support laws that make it easier to do whatever they wish regarding family and child-rearing practices. " CHILDREN IN MOTION If your child is prone to motion sickness, here are some travel tips from Parenting magazine.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
This year, New York City marks the centennial of the city's consolidation from 40 municipalities into five boroughs on Jan. 1, 1898. On that day, the population jumped to 3.4 million from 2 million, making it, at the time, the world's second-largest city, after London. It's a yearlong celebration, and some of the biggest events, naturally, take place this summer. The Five-Boroughs-One-City Weekend on June 19-22 will be a highlight, but many other events are being swept into the celebration.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
For the first two years of its existence the Women's Theatre Festival called itself the Women's Theatre Festival at Penn. When planning began last fall for the festival's third season, chairman Ann Louise Elliott appealed to University of Pennsylvania officials for money and, she said, "they basically said no. " "'We don't have any money this year, but we're sure you can do it on your own,"' Elliott said she was told. The university's confidence was not misplaced. Elliott, the eight members of the festival's board and a group of volunteers put together an event that offers more performers than the first two festivals and will present them in a single theater.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alan Rubin, 87, of Center City, a retired obstetrician and gynecologist and a prolific contributor to medical research, died at home Monday, May 16, of complications from Parkinson's disease. Dr. Rubin had a practice in Center City, served on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, and was chief of gynecology at the former Graduate Hospital when he retired in 1989. Before that, he was chairman of the obstetrics and gynecology department at Albert Einstein Medical Center.
SPORTS
February 19, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
UNIONDALE, N.Y. - Claude Giroux, in his first crisis as the Flyers' captain, harshly criticized his struggling team for "going through the motions" in Montreal on Saturday night. For one day, at least, the motion sickness is over. As if on cue, 26 seconds into the Flyers' first game since Giroux's outburst, the 25-year-old center scored on a rebound and finished with three points, sparking a 7-0 romp over the New York Islanders at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on Monday afternoon.
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SPORTS
February 19, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
UNIONDALE, N.Y. - Claude Giroux, in his first crisis as the Flyers' captain, harshly criticized his struggling team for "going through the motions" in Montreal on Saturday night. For one day, at least, the motion sickness is over. As if on cue, 26 seconds into the Flyers' first game since Giroux's outburst, the 25-year-old center scored on a rebound and finished with three points, sparking a 7-0 romp over the New York Islanders at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on Monday afternoon.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alan Rubin, 87, of Center City, a retired obstetrician and gynecologist and a prolific contributor to medical research, died at home Monday, May 16, of complications from Parkinson's disease. Dr. Rubin had a practice in Center City, served on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, and was chief of gynecology at the former Graduate Hospital when he retired in 1989. Before that, he was chairman of the obstetrics and gynecology department at Albert Einstein Medical Center.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a reporter aboard the "Vomit Comet," I thought my job seemed easy enough: to make sure NASA's photographer got a good shot of the two students from Rowan University doing an experiment on the flight, take mental notes, and follow the rules to avoid motion sickness. Rule No. 1 was to keep your head steady. Rule No. 2 was to avert your eyes from anyone else throwing up. But before I knew it, Rowan senior Bill McCorkle was using his airsickness bag, and his partner, D.J. Kephart, had asked me to take over.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
This year, New York City marks the centennial of the city's consolidation from 40 municipalities into five boroughs on Jan. 1, 1898. On that day, the population jumped to 3.4 million from 2 million, making it, at the time, the world's second-largest city, after London. It's a yearlong celebration, and some of the biggest events, naturally, take place this summer. The Five-Boroughs-One-City Weekend on June 19-22 will be a highlight, but many other events are being swept into the celebration.
NEWS
September 29, 1994 | By ROBERT SCHMUHL
From America's founding until quite recently, people in political life and civic-minded folk in general assumed, accurately or otherwise, that a common body of public knowledge was shared by the citizenry at a given time. The relatively small number of information sources helped shape this belief. There were fewer distractions or alternatives. Now, with so much choice - and so much more to come - there will be new responsibilities of citizenship. Interestingly, with all the different possibilities for information, it will no longer serve much purpose to pillory "the media" for superficial or slanted coverage.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
HOME TRUTHS Dan Quayle take note: Sixty-three percent of respondents to a recent survey don't expect American families to return to the traditional values of the 1950s. In addition, 55 percent of 1,009 adults surveyed by the Barna Research Group of Glendale, Calif., said that in the near future, "adults will support laws that make it easier to do whatever they wish regarding family and child-rearing practices. " CHILDREN IN MOTION If your child is prone to motion sickness, here are some travel tips from Parenting magazine.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | From MICHAEL LACING
OH BABY After seeing the full-page nude shot of Drew Barrymore in the current issue of Vanity Fair, e.t. phoned home and said he may stick around a little longer. LOVE THY NEIGHBOR The New York Rangers not only choked in the playoffs but didn't get Eric Lindros. The Yankees and Mets both stink. Boy, it doesn't get any better than this. OPEN BOOK At the recent American Medical Association convention, doctors discussed whether to post fees on the door. If successful, lawyers may announce whether they live under a big rock or a little rock.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Karl Neumann, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Cruising has gained tremendous popularity among leisure travelers in recent years. But many others are leery of stepping aboard, fearing that they will suffer mal de mer - seasickness. Everyone has cures for motion sickness. Folk medicine calls for eating ginger root and olives. Ships' bartenders recommend either brandy and port, or creme de menthe with bitters. But, as always, the best medicine is an ounce of prevention. Today, many seagoers wear wristbands to prevent motion sickness.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
For the first two years of its existence the Women's Theatre Festival called itself the Women's Theatre Festival at Penn. When planning began last fall for the festival's third season, chairman Ann Louise Elliott appealed to University of Pennsylvania officials for money and, she said, "they basically said no. " "'We don't have any money this year, but we're sure you can do it on your own,"' Elliott said she was told. The university's confidence was not misplaced. Elliott, the eight members of the festival's board and a group of volunteers put together an event that offers more performers than the first two festivals and will present them in a single theater.
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