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NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By Steve Edgcumbe, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly 200 traffic citations were issued to motorists along Route 3, the West Chester Pike, on Monday as municipal police from West Goshen to Upper Darby beefed up patrols on the 27-mile stretch of highway. The citations were handed out between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. during a "safety blitz" of the roadway. The blitz was part of an ongoing state Department of Transportation program that aims to boost safety on 55 major highways in the state. "It went very well," Newtown Township Police Chief Stanley Short said yesterday.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | BY TED LEONARD
I agree with Joanne R. Denworth's assessment of the need to repair the state's highways and bridges (Guest Opinion, "Fix roads, but don't forget mass transit"), but I am concerned that she is also advocating that the state's motorists reach deeper into their pockets to fund mass transit systems most of them will never use. It may surprise many motorists to learn they already pay a great deal for mass transit. Motorists pay 18 cents federal tax at the gas pump, of which only 10 cents is used for highway maintenance.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
Mary Tate thought she heard a bomb explode. But the loud bang that filled her Oldsmobile Toronado as she drove down Admiral Wilson Boulevard toward the Benjamin Franklin Bridge on Wednesday evening was the sound of her own windshield breaking. Tate's car was one of several vehicles that were bombarded Wednesday evening as vandals dropped debris from the Conrail railroad bridge onto moving vehicles below. "I didn't know what happened," said Tate, of Philadelphia, who estimated that she was driving about 30 m.p.h.
NEWS
May 9, 1986 | By SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia ambushed its own Kelly Drive rush-hour commuters this morning. The heavily-traveled scenic drive was shut down - without warning to motorists - at 6 a.m. The occasion was the Dad Vail Regatta. It's the world's largest intercollegiate rowing competition, according to Jack Seitz, president of the Collegiate Rowing Association. About 75 colleges, 1,000 sculls, 3,000 competitors and up to 25,000 spectators are here for the two-day event, according to a report by 92nd Police District Capt.
NEWS
August 28, 2001
IN RESPONSE to your Aug. 20 editorial ("Red Means Stop"): I want to assure you and your readers that the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation is committed to maintaining the safest possible state highway system for the millions of people who use it each day in the Greater Philadelphia Region and throughout the commonwealth. PennDOT invested $27 million from 1995 to 1997 to rebuild and improve safety along 13 miles of Roosevelt Boulevard between 9th Street and the Bucks County line.
NEWS
April 12, 2002 | By Joseph J. Stine
The Black Ministers Council of New Jersey is urging motorists stopped by police to refuse any request for a search and demand a legal reason for the examination (news brief, March 14). When I heard about this, I couldn't help thinking about the bad old days 34 years ago when I was a young police sergeant in North Philadelphia. I remember being full of hope and ideals. I knew my squad was going to make a difference for the people living in that crime-infested neighborhood. My assignment just before being promoted had been in the lily-white Northeast part of the city.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Burlington County Bridge Commission calls them "openings. " But to the hundreds of motorists stuck each time the deck of the Tacony-Palmyra or Burlington-Bristol Bridges rises, those random events are definitely closings. "My son has a doctor's appointment at 6 o'clock," said a frustrated William Lyou, stuck in an opening last week that had begun at 5:13 p.m. It was 5:32, peak rush hour. Traffic on Route 73 in New Jersey was backed up for nearly a mile, and vehicles on Robbins Street in Philadelphia were halted for blocks.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
The motorist's best friend - right turn on red - could be an endangered species in Philadelphia. At yesterday's City Council hearing on pedestrian safety, several experts suggested the city abolish legal turns at red lights because motorists frequently ignore people crossing the street. Though statistics show only a minor increase in accidents at turn-on-red intersections, David Bachman, a PennDOT traffic expert, said the turns have created a "pedestrian-unfriendly environment.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Philadelphia motorists, the nightmare may continue. Just as they await the scheduled completion of the Schuylkill Expressway reconstruction project later today, plans already are in place to convert West River Drive from a one-way entry or escape route during the morning and evening rush hours to a two-way thoroughfare all the time, beginning Monday. Montgomery Drive, Neill Drive, the Falls Bridge and Calumet Street also will be made two way 24 hours a day. Compounding the difficulties, West River Drive will be closed for repairs from the Sweetbriar cutoff to Eakins Oval for two weeks, beginning Monday, Streets Commissioner Alexander L. Hoskins announced yesterday.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
An air-traffic controller driving to work on Interstate 95 yesterday afternoon teamed up with another motorist to stop a tractor-trailer that had sideswiped a city police cruiser near the Benjamin Franklin Bridge, police said. The officer driving the police car, Andrew Martin, assigned to the Accident Investigation Division, received head, face and shoulder injuries in the accident. He was reported in stable condition last night at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to police accident investigators, Martin was southbound on the expressway about 2:15 p.m. when the rear wheels of the rig hit the police car, causing it to run out of control and strike a wall on the shoulder of the highway.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A computer malfunction has saved about 17,000 motorists, including hundreds in four South Jersey towns, from getting $85 tickets for running red lights. The company that operates red-light cameras for 17 New Jersey towns, American Traffic Solutions Inc. of Tempe, Ariz., has notified the state that a computer glitch occurred between May 28 and June 30 and resulted in motorists not receiving notices of violations that had occurred earlier this year. Under state law, if a ticket is not served within 90 days, it must be dismissed.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
CAMDEN COUNTY PATCO riders and motorists who use the Ben Franklin Bridge can talk to DRPA officials at three public meetings next month. The meetings are being held to provide more information about expected delays for both train commuters and motorists caused by a two-year, $103-million track construction project on the bridge. Those delays will increase on Friday, as single-tracking will last from 5:30 a.m. on Fridays until 4:30 a.m. on Mondays. Then, in early June, one track will be closed all day, every day, for 60 days.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania motorists, already facing higher prices at the gas pumps, will see some vehicle fees rise next week, courtesy of the transportation-funding law approved last year. Act 89, the transportation measure advocated by Gov. Corbett and narrowly approved by the legislature in November, will provide about $2.3 billion more a year by 2018 for better roads, safer bridges, and improved public transit. This year, the revenue will be about $350 million, but it will increase each year as taxes and fees rise.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A majority of New Jersey motorists continues to support the use of red-light cameras, but in declining numbers, a new survey by AAA shows. The poll of 1,000 motorists found 56 percent support use of the cameras to catch drivers who run red lights. That's down from 77 percent in 2007, before New Jersey allowed the use of such cameras, and down from 61 percent in 2011, as cameras were being used in 25 towns as part of a five-year pilot program. Some of the change in attitude may be attributed to their increased usage, as people who have been caught by red-light cameras are more likely to view them negatively, AAA Mid-Atlantic spokeswoman Jenny Robinson said.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Burlington County Bridge Commission calls them "openings. " But to the hundreds of motorists stuck each time the deck of the Tacony-Palmyra or Burlington-Bristol Bridges rises, those random events are definitely closings. "My son has a doctor's appointment at 6 o'clock," said a frustrated William Lyou, stuck in an opening last week that had begun at 5:13 p.m. It was 5:32, peak rush hour. Traffic on Route 73 in New Jersey was backed up for nearly a mile, and vehicles on Robbins Street in Philadelphia were halted for blocks.
NEWS
November 30, 2013
As the first Pennsylvania suburb prepares to install red-light cameras, Abington Township residents may well fear that their tax bills will take a big jump to pay for the program if not enough motorists flout the law. That's the dilemma posed by red-light camera enforcement programs, which require substantial sums upfront to cover the cost of installing and maintaining cameras, as well as the paperwork associated with issuing $100 tickets to motorists who...
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The speed limit on Kelly Drive near Fountain Green Drive is 35 m.p.h., but the average speed of motorists is nearly 55. In an attempt to slow everybody down, the city has installed sensors in the roadway that determine the speed of vehicles approaching Fountain Green, about a half-mile north of the Girard Avenue Bridge. If a vehicle passes the sensor going above the speed limit, the light at Fountain Green turns red. Previously, the light turned red only if a car was waiting to turn onto Kelly Drive or a pedestrian pushed the crosswalk button.
NEWS
September 9, 2013
Among the legions of motorists who take to the roads each day in New Jersey, it may be difficult to find one who doesn't realize that texting behind the wheel is dangerous, according to opinion surveys. Distracted driving has killed and seriously injured people on highways across the region and nation. So why do so many motorists still text? The question continues to dog lawmakers in Trenton. Having sensibly banned drivers from even handling cellphones, much less texting with them, the Legislature is toying with the idea of allowing police to confiscate smartphones on the spot if drivers are caught holding them.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis and Megan Rogers, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - The state Senate approved a $2.5 billion transportation-funding bill Wednesday, aimed at repairing thousands of aging bridges and miles of roads while pumping more money into transit, setting the stage for a fight over the bill's fate in the House. The plan, championed by Transportation Committee Chairman John Rafferty (R., Montgomery), ups the ante on the $1.8 billion proposal Gov. Corbett unveiled in February to address the state's infrastructure problems. Rafferty's bill, was approved on a 45-5 vote, would increase driver's license and vehicle-registration fees, and put a hefty surcharge on speeders and others who violate traffic laws.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vice President Joe Biden will be in Philadelphia Monday morning to address the University of Pennsylvania's 257th commencement. The ceremony will be held at Franklin Field and motorists should be prepared for traffic backups in the area. Biden will receive an honorary doctor of laws degree.  
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