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NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Burlington County Bridge Commission calls them "openings. " But to the hundreds of motorists stuck each time the deck of the Tacony-Palmyra or Burlington-Bristol Bridges rises, those random events are definitely closings. "My son has a doctor's appointment at 6 o'clock," said a frustrated William Lyou, stuck in an opening last week that had begun at 5:13 p.m. It was 5:32, peak rush hour. Traffic on Route 73 in New Jersey was backed up for nearly a mile, and vehicles on Robbins Street in Philadelphia were halted for blocks.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By Steve Edgcumbe, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly 200 traffic citations were issued to motorists along Route 3, the West Chester Pike, on Monday as municipal police from West Goshen to Upper Darby beefed up patrols on the 27-mile stretch of highway. The citations were handed out between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. during a "safety blitz" of the roadway. The blitz was part of an ongoing state Department of Transportation program that aims to boost safety on 55 major highways in the state. "It went very well," Newtown Township Police Chief Stanley Short said yesterday.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | BY TED LEONARD
I agree with Joanne R. Denworth's assessment of the need to repair the state's highways and bridges (Guest Opinion, "Fix roads, but don't forget mass transit"), but I am concerned that she is also advocating that the state's motorists reach deeper into their pockets to fund mass transit systems most of them will never use. It may surprise many motorists to learn they already pay a great deal for mass transit. Motorists pay 18 cents federal tax at the gas pump, of which only 10 cents is used for highway maintenance.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
Mary Tate thought she heard a bomb explode. But the loud bang that filled her Oldsmobile Toronado as she drove down Admiral Wilson Boulevard toward the Benjamin Franklin Bridge on Wednesday evening was the sound of her own windshield breaking. Tate's car was one of several vehicles that were bombarded Wednesday evening as vandals dropped debris from the Conrail railroad bridge onto moving vehicles below. "I didn't know what happened," said Tate, of Philadelphia, who estimated that she was driving about 30 m.p.h.
NEWS
May 9, 1986 | By SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia ambushed its own Kelly Drive rush-hour commuters this morning. The heavily-traveled scenic drive was shut down - without warning to motorists - at 6 a.m. The occasion was the Dad Vail Regatta. It's the world's largest intercollegiate rowing competition, according to Jack Seitz, president of the Collegiate Rowing Association. About 75 colleges, 1,000 sculls, 3,000 competitors and up to 25,000 spectators are here for the two-day event, according to a report by 92nd Police District Capt.
NEWS
August 28, 2001
IN RESPONSE to your Aug. 20 editorial ("Red Means Stop"): I want to assure you and your readers that the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation is committed to maintaining the safest possible state highway system for the millions of people who use it each day in the Greater Philadelphia Region and throughout the commonwealth. PennDOT invested $27 million from 1995 to 1997 to rebuild and improve safety along 13 miles of Roosevelt Boulevard between 9th Street and the Bucks County line.
NEWS
April 12, 2002 | By Joseph J. Stine
The Black Ministers Council of New Jersey is urging motorists stopped by police to refuse any request for a search and demand a legal reason for the examination (news brief, March 14). When I heard about this, I couldn't help thinking about the bad old days 34 years ago when I was a young police sergeant in North Philadelphia. I remember being full of hope and ideals. I knew my squad was going to make a difference for the people living in that crime-infested neighborhood. My assignment just before being promoted had been in the lily-white Northeast part of the city.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
The motorist's best friend - right turn on red - could be an endangered species in Philadelphia. At yesterday's City Council hearing on pedestrian safety, several experts suggested the city abolish legal turns at red lights because motorists frequently ignore people crossing the street. Though statistics show only a minor increase in accidents at turn-on-red intersections, David Bachman, a PennDOT traffic expert, said the turns have created a "pedestrian-unfriendly environment.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Philadelphia motorists, the nightmare may continue. Just as they await the scheduled completion of the Schuylkill Expressway reconstruction project later today, plans already are in place to convert West River Drive from a one-way entry or escape route during the morning and evening rush hours to a two-way thoroughfare all the time, beginning Monday. Montgomery Drive, Neill Drive, the Falls Bridge and Calumet Street also will be made two way 24 hours a day. Compounding the difficulties, West River Drive will be closed for repairs from the Sweetbriar cutoff to Eakins Oval for two weeks, beginning Monday, Streets Commissioner Alexander L. Hoskins announced yesterday.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
An air-traffic controller driving to work on Interstate 95 yesterday afternoon teamed up with another motorist to stop a tractor-trailer that had sideswiped a city police cruiser near the Benjamin Franklin Bridge, police said. The officer driving the police car, Andrew Martin, assigned to the Accident Investigation Division, received head, face and shoulder injuries in the accident. He was reported in stable condition last night at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to police accident investigators, Martin was southbound on the expressway about 2:15 p.m. when the rear wheels of the rig hit the police car, causing it to run out of control and strike a wall on the shoulder of the highway.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis and Chris Palmer, STAFF WRITERS
For nearly 24 hours, said Philadelphia lawyer Mark Kaltenbach, he had gone nowhere but the driver's seat of his car, stranded with 500 other motorists on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. It was dark, bitter cold - wind chills were in the single digits - and blizzardlike conditions were everywhere. He got out of his car and walked. Kaltenbach trudged in snow 2 to 3 feet deep from mile marker 129 to mile marker 127.5, only to find that a turnpike telephone recording had wrongly said he would find emergency workers there.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Top state officials profusely thanked the guardsmen, firefighters, and others who helped keep stranded travelers safe after last weekend's snowstorm brought about the state's latest impromptu turnpike tailgate party. And they certainly deserve credit for preventing the worst, as do the civilians who helped each other during the ordeal. But more than gratitude, the Wolf administration and the Turnpike Commission owe emergency workers and the public a promise that this will be the last in a long series of dangerous surprise sleepovers on Pennsylvania's highways.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Staff Writer
FOR ONE CHERRY HILL motorist, getting stuck in a pile of snow during the height of this weekend's blizzard was just the beginning of her problems. According to Cherry Hill police, who responded to about 40 calls for disabled cars during the weekend's storm, one call about 8 p.m. Saturday was "unlike the rest," a news release said. When officers got to the scene of the accident, on Route 70 near Brace Road, motorist Tamera Flynn declined any police assistance, despite the fact that the 2007 Lexus she was driving was "stranded" on a large pile of snow, the news release said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Over the last decade, American cities have been making a concentrated effort to repair the damage done by a century of car-first policies. It hasn't been easy, because so much public territory was ceded to motorists in that period. Streets got wider, sidewalks narrower. Elegant street lamps were replaced with highway lights that cast our neighborhoods in the melancholy shadows of an Edward Hopper painting. But now, urban planners are starting to pile up the wins. They've introduced amenities that encourage the slow-movers - things like sidewalk cafes, parklets, bike lanes, and riverfront trails.
NEWS
September 3, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police are asking for the public's help in finding an East Germantown man who they say shot another man in the head last week in a neighborhood dispute. Chris Miller, 24, also known as George Spain and "Fell," is wanted on aggravated assault charges. About 6 p.m. Aug. 25, police said, Miller walked up to a 29-year-old man who had stopped his car at a stop sign at Woodlawn and Bloyd Streets in East Germantown. The man made it through the intersection, then heard a gunshot and blacked out, he told police.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
TWO CYCLISTS riding Indego bikes got a taste of life in the fast lane when they cruised down Interstate 676 Sunday night. A video captured by a driver's dashcam shows the pair using Indego, the city's bike-sharing system, heading westbound around 10 p.m. Neither of the cyclists appears to be wearing a helmet as they ride between the edge of the far-right lane and a concrete barrier. Mervin Choun, the driver who filmed the video, said he was heading to his Brewerytown home when he noticed the traffic slowing down near the interstate's 8th Street entrance.
NEWS
June 26, 2015
I WAS AFRAID for a while Philadelphia City Council wouldn't come up with the funds to close the school-funding gap. Well, Council didn't, just $70 million of the $103 million Schools Superintendent William Hite had requested. The remaining deficit will come (we hope) from Good Gov. Wolf, handcuffed by a tax-averse Republican Legislature. Where will Philly's $70 million come from? It is reported $50 million will come from a 4.5 percent property-tax increase, $10 million from an increase in the use-and-occupancy tax on commercial property (I'll let the Chamber of Commerce worry about that)
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
After five years, New Jersey's pilot red-light camera traffic program came to a quiet end. But the debate continues on whether the controversial experiment improved safety or was just a cash cow for municipalities that raked in millions from frustrated motorists. Six municipalities in Camden and Gloucester Counties installed cameras at nine intersections in South Jersey under the program, which began in 2009. The cameras nailed hundreds of thousands of motorists blowing through intersections when the light was red. At $85 each, the citations pulled in millions of dollars in fines for more than two dozen municipalities, which were allowed to keep the bulk of the money to add to their coffers.
NEWS
November 4, 2014
THE BUREAU OF Administrative Adjudication. I always loved the sound of the name, if not the process. That's where you go to fight your parking tickets, and that's where I went last week with Brian Yan, a guy fighting for a principle. In August, I reported that Yan, 38, had pulled into a parking space in Center City and was ticketed before he could walk to the curb. He filed an appeal the day he was ticketed and received a response the same day, saying it had been received. A month later, he got a letter saying his appeal was rejected - he thought he had filed an intent to appeal - and that he must pay $36, or he could appeal again.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
PAUL DiMAIO screamed and screamed into his phone. Maybe it was for a few minutes, maybe more. Time had lost all meaning. His panicked cries came out small and tinny on his wife's cellphone, lost among the unnerving sounds of a highway on Monday afternoon - the whooshing of passing motorists, and the wail of an approaching ambulance. Moments earlier, Lisa Taylor DiMaio had been chatting with her husband about their family. The conversation came to a sudden halt just before 4 p.m. when a black sedan cut in front of her Jeep Liberty on a southbound lane of I-95, not far from State Road.
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