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Motorola Mobility

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NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Google already makes the Android software that powers the country's most commonly owned type of smartphone. The announcement that it plans to buy Motorola Mobility, a leading U.S. handset developer, sets the stage for a head-to-head contest with Apple, which makes the Android's more profitable and highly touted competitor, the iPhone. The $12.5 billion deal, approved by both companies' boards, still must clear an antitrust review. But industry analysts and other observers of the exploding smartphone market quickly portrayed the purchase as a potential game-changer.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Standard & Poor's is saying that investors should sell Google's stock because it believes the search leader's decision to buy Motorola Mobility increases the risk to the company and its shares. Google Inc. said Monday that it will pay $12.5 billion for Motorola Mobility, a major maker of phones using Google's Android mobile software. The deal includes mobile patents that could help Google defend itself against rivals. S&P said yesterday that while the acquisition would include a patent trove, that might not be enough to keep Google's Android mobile operating software from encountering intellectual-property issues.
NEWS
October 15, 2011
Robert Galvin, 89, who was Motorola Inc.'s chief executive officer for 29 years and took it from a maker of police radios and television to one of the world's leading electronics companies, died Tuesday in Chicago. Mr. Galvin was named CEO in 1959 at the death of his father, company founder Paul Galvin. He remained in the post until 1986 and stayed on as chairman until 1990. Mr. Galvin oversaw Motorola's pioneering efforts in the cellular industry, including the creation of the first commercial cellphone in 1973 and the construction of the first cellphone network in the early 1980s.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Google Inc.'s $12.5 billion purchase of Motorola Mobility Inc. would make the online search and advertising giant the owner, not just of Illinois-based Motorola's money-losing mobile-phone factories, but also of Motorola's vast phone-patent portfolio - and its profitable, Horsham-based video-equipment arm, which counts Comcast and other TV giants among its clients. This "defensive" deal, which follows Google's failure to win Nortel Corp.'s smartphone patents in bidding against Microsoft and Apple last month, is "entirely driven by the patent portfolio," Jordan Rohan , analyst at Stifel Nicolaus & Co. , told clients in a report.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2012 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Google plummeted almost $80 a share, more than 10 percent, and trading was halted 21/2 hours Thursday after a disappointing earnings report was published ahead of schedule, surprising investors. Bleak figures in the report about online advertising dragged down Facebook stock, too, sending the Nasdaq composite index skidding on a day when the broader stock market was mostly flat. The Nasdaq fell 31.25 points, or 1 percent, to close at 3,072.87. Google was trading at $754 per share at 12:30 p.m., then fell almost $20 in a minute after investors saw the report, a draft.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2011
"There is a serious concern that you are going to get recession sooner or later. It is a phenomenal period in history. " - Jim Reid, credit strategist at Deutsche Bank AG, on the state of the global economy. "They were always getting beaten up by Apple because Apple could control the whole experience - hardware, software, packaging. Now Google can play that game, too. " - Carl Howe, researcher at Yankee Group Research Inc., regarding Google Inc.'s purchase of Motorola Mobility.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Wireless-industry analyst Roger Entner calls it the "Apple blackout. " Fans of the old TV comedy series Get Smart might think of it as the Apple "cone of silence" - the shroud due to descend momentarily on just about any technology news unrelated to the iPhone 5, which Apple is expected to unveil next week. The cone's inevitable descent surely explains why some of the biggest names in non-Apple technology took to the stage Wednesday to tout several of their latest inventions - mostly well before they'll actually hit the market.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
By all accounts, the third quarter was wretched for U.S. equity markets, with the major indexes down at least 12 percent. The Inquirer/Bloomberg Philadelphia Index slid 14.03 percent compared with a broader index it tends to track - the Standard & Poor's 500, which dropped 14.33 percent. Good news was in short supply for the 175-stock index, composed of the common stocks of companies based in the Philadelphia region or with significant operations here. Before isolating the best and worst performers from that group, I excluded any stock that began the quarter with a price below $3 a share to remove penny stocks, which tend to have the most dramatic price swings.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
GenNx360 Capital Partners, a New York industrial buyout firm started by former General Electric Equipment Services boss Arthur H. Harper and his partners — mostly African American engineers and GE veterans — says it has joined with deep-drilling rig builder Schramm Inc.'s president Edward Breiner and other managers to buy the century-old West Chester firm, in hopes of boosting sales to its multinational clients, and cutting costs. GenNx360 won't say what it's paying the previous owners, including successors of the firm's founders, who sold because the company needed more expansion capital than they could easily raise, according to people familiar with the deal.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012
IN THE REGION Leadership changes at Teva Teva Pharmaceuticals Industries Ltd. , said it is changing the leadership of its Americas unit, which is based in North Wales, Montgomery County. Bill Marth will step down immediately as president and chief executive of Teva Americas and retire at the end of 2013. Until then, he will serve as an adviser to Jeremy Levin, who since early 2012 has been CEO of the entire company. Allan Oberman will become president and CEO of Teva Americas Generics.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 2012
IN THE REGION Leadership changes at Teva Teva Pharmaceuticals Industries Ltd. , said it is changing the leadership of its Americas unit, which is based in North Wales, Montgomery County. Bill Marth will step down immediately as president and chief executive of Teva Americas and retire at the end of 2013. Until then, he will serve as an adviser to Jeremy Levin, who since early 2012 has been CEO of the entire company. Allan Oberman will become president and CEO of Teva Americas Generics.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2012 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Google plummeted almost $80 a share, more than 10 percent, and trading was halted 21/2 hours Thursday after a disappointing earnings report was published ahead of schedule, surprising investors. Bleak figures in the report about online advertising dragged down Facebook stock, too, sending the Nasdaq composite index skidding on a day when the broader stock market was mostly flat. The Nasdaq fell 31.25 points, or 1 percent, to close at 3,072.87. Google was trading at $754 per share at 12:30 p.m., then fell almost $20 in a minute after investors saw the report, a draft.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Wireless-industry analyst Roger Entner calls it the "Apple blackout. " Fans of the old TV comedy series Get Smart might think of it as the Apple "cone of silence" - the shroud due to descend momentarily on just about any technology news unrelated to the iPhone 5, which Apple is expected to unveil next week. The cone's inevitable descent surely explains why some of the biggest names in non-Apple technology took to the stage Wednesday to tout several of their latest inventions - mostly well before they'll actually hit the market.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
GenNx360 Capital Partners, a New York industrial buyout firm started by former General Electric Equipment Services boss Arthur H. Harper and his partners — mostly African American engineers and GE veterans — says it has joined with deep-drilling rig builder Schramm Inc.'s president Edward Breiner and other managers to buy the century-old West Chester firm, in hopes of boosting sales to its multinational clients, and cutting costs. GenNx360 won't say what it's paying the previous owners, including successors of the firm's founders, who sold because the company needed more expansion capital than they could easily raise, according to people familiar with the deal.
NEWS
October 15, 2011
Robert Galvin, 89, who was Motorola Inc.'s chief executive officer for 29 years and took it from a maker of police radios and television to one of the world's leading electronics companies, died Tuesday in Chicago. Mr. Galvin was named CEO in 1959 at the death of his father, company founder Paul Galvin. He remained in the post until 1986 and stayed on as chairman until 1990. Mr. Galvin oversaw Motorola's pioneering efforts in the cellular industry, including the creation of the first commercial cellphone in 1973 and the construction of the first cellphone network in the early 1980s.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
By all accounts, the third quarter was wretched for U.S. equity markets, with the major indexes down at least 12 percent. The Inquirer/Bloomberg Philadelphia Index slid 14.03 percent compared with a broader index it tends to track - the Standard & Poor's 500, which dropped 14.33 percent. Good news was in short supply for the 175-stock index, composed of the common stocks of companies based in the Philadelphia region or with significant operations here. Before isolating the best and worst performers from that group, I excluded any stock that began the quarter with a price below $3 a share to remove penny stocks, which tend to have the most dramatic price swings.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2011
"There is a serious concern that you are going to get recession sooner or later. It is a phenomenal period in history. " - Jim Reid, credit strategist at Deutsche Bank AG, on the state of the global economy. "They were always getting beaten up by Apple because Apple could control the whole experience - hardware, software, packaging. Now Google can play that game, too. " - Carl Howe, researcher at Yankee Group Research Inc., regarding Google Inc.'s purchase of Motorola Mobility.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Standard & Poor's is saying that investors should sell Google's stock because it believes the search leader's decision to buy Motorola Mobility increases the risk to the company and its shares. Google Inc. said Monday that it will pay $12.5 billion for Motorola Mobility, a major maker of phones using Google's Android mobile software. The deal includes mobile patents that could help Google defend itself against rivals. S&P said yesterday that while the acquisition would include a patent trove, that might not be enough to keep Google's Android mobile operating software from encountering intellectual-property issues.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Google already makes the Android software that powers the country's most commonly owned type of smartphone. The announcement that it plans to buy Motorola Mobility, a leading U.S. handset developer, sets the stage for a head-to-head contest with Apple, which makes the Android's more profitable and highly touted competitor, the iPhone. The $12.5 billion deal, approved by both companies' boards, still must clear an antitrust review. But industry analysts and other observers of the exploding smartphone market quickly portrayed the purchase as a potential game-changer.
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