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Mountain Gorillas

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NEWS
March 26, 1993 | by H. Dieter Stelkis, From the New York Times
I climbed the slope of the volcano slowly, knowing the gorillas were near, just beyond the green tangle of thistle and nettle in front of me. Suddenly the wall of vegetation exploded as Bilbo, the dominant silverback male of a group of gorillas studied by researchers, thundered toward me, sending me flying backward, tumbling head over heels to the bottom of this large salad bowl. I lay laughing uncontrollably, heady from the adrenaline pumping through me, happy to have survived, though ungracefully, my first personal encounter with one of the Karisoke Research Center's groups of wild mountain gorillas in Rwanda.
NEWS
January 7, 1986
Instead of burying the article about the death of Dian Fossey in the back of the Dec. 29 issue, it should have been blazed across the front page. Ms. Fossey was a martyr to the cause of saving the rare and inoffensive mountain gorillas from extinction and she was a very brave woman. Her book Gorillas in the Mist describes her long struggle against the poachers and their steel snares that maimed and crippled many of her gorilla friends. These poachers had no respect or love of wildlife and merely wanted to kill gorillas to sell parts of their remains as trophies, or to catch baby gorillas and keep them in unsanitary conditions, where they contracted many human diseases, until they could be sold to zoos.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | By Mike Steere, FOR THE INQUIRER
If warring factions and streams of refugees continue to leave them alone, Rwanda's population of mountain gorillas may emerge unscathed from the country's devastating civil war. Being left alone does not, however, guarantee a future for the great apes of northwestern Rwanda, part of a population of about 300 mountain gorillas living high in the Virunga Mountains on the borders of Rwanda, Zaire and Uganda. These gorillas constitute half the world's number of the endangered subspecies.
NEWS
August 22, 1986 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)
The central African nation of Rwanda has issued an international arrest warrant for a New Jersey wildlife researcher in the slaying of naturalist Dian Fossey, who was killed last year at an African camp where she was studying rare mountain gorillas. Actualites Nationales, a daily newsletter published by the Rwandan Ministry of Information, said Wayne Richard McGuire, 34, of Hazlet, Monmouth County, was "suspected of being implicated in the murder. " The newsletter said five Rwandans, whom it did not identify, also were suspects.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
In the deceptively short book Marilyn: Norma Jeane, with photographs by George Barris (Signet, $4.95), author Gloria Steinem writes: "If you add her years of movie stardom to the years since her death, Marilyn Monroe has been part of our lives and imaginations for nearly four decades. That's a very long time for one celebrity to survive in a throwaway culture. " You get a memorable reason why in Barris' first photograph of Monroe: The 36-year-old woman who still looks like a little girl stares at us with a vulnerability that shrivels the heart.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
The 1988 movie Gorillas in the Mist helped make mountain-gorilla tours popular in Rwanda, but an insurgency there has largely ended the tours and naturalists voice some fear for the gorillas' welfare. About 310 mountain gorillas survive in Rwanda's Kagera National Park, where armed rebels of the Rwandese Patriotic Front have been present since early this year. Since January, a group of seven or eight gorillas known as Group 9 has been missing, according to a spokeswoman for the Digit Fund, the nonprofit organization set up by the famed gorilla researcher, Dian Fossey, to protect the gorillas.
NEWS
May 4, 1986 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adventure travel is a hot market these days, with companies and people jumping into business all the time. Travel with them, most often, is exhilarating, but sometimes the adventure comes not on some mountain peak, but at some forsaken jumping-off spot when the airplane or the guide doesn't show. That's not likely to happen with Wilderness Travel, an outfit that's been around nine years. Its international staff comprises some of the last of the rugged individualists; its free 80-page picture-laden "1986 Trip Preview" is a trip all by itself.
NEWS
September 19, 1999 | By Doug Lansky, FOR THE INQUIRER
Tracking mountain gorillas was made famous by American Dian Fossey (1932-1985), who went to Zaire (now called the Republic of Congo) and Rwanda in the '60s to study primates. Fossey also wrote the book Gorillas in the Mist, later made into a major Hollywood film starring Sigourney Weaver as Fossey. Following standard operating procedure in Hollywood, the 1983 movie drifted as far as possible from the actual information in Fossey's book. From what I can tell, the main truths it captured were: (1)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1997 | By Sari Harrar, FOR THE INQUIRER
Leave it to Banff to hatch the planet's premier festival of films about mountains and their mystique. Nestled in the front range of the Canadian Rockies, the quaint British Columbia burg has long been heaven on Earth for mountain lovers. There's boulder-climbing right in town. Rock jocks who prefer ice axes and spiked boots frequent a convenient waterfall that freezes solid in the long northern winter. Less adventurous tourists with fat wallets hire helicopters to drop them in the wilderness for an afternoon and pluck them out in time to dress for dinner.
NEWS
April 29, 1994
CARTOON SANS COMPASSION I was disturbed by the lack of compassion in Signe Wilkinson's cartoon April 14 (animal lovers in the midst of human bodies in Rwanda, saying, "The endangered gorillas still seem alive . . . I guess everything's OK. "). Some Rwandans involved in the carnage there have brought suffering upon themselves and others, but the mountain gorillas, like most of the human victims, are innocent and powerless against the weapons of violence. Ms. Wilkinson is probably aware that Rwanda's gentle and intelligent mountain gorillas are on the brink of extinction as a result of human ignorance and greed.
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NEWS
October 14, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A young woman of wrenlike delicacy stood onstage at the Agnes Irwin School in Bryn Mawr and told a harrowing story that the girls in the room, smart though they were, could not grasp. In 1994, when Francine Mugueni was 4, her parents and six siblings were slaughtered in the Rwandan genocide, in which nearly a million people were killed in 100 days. Left behind to mourn and bury the bodies were mostly women and orphans like Mugueni and her 14-year-old sister. To have money to survive, they dropped out of school and cleaned offices.
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When a teacher at Episcopal Academy in Merion showed a segment of the Oscar-nominated film Hotel Rwanda in her world history class last year, Mallika Khandelwal was horrified and set out to learn more about the genocide that ravaged Rwanda in 1994. Khandelwal, 16, says she found herself "appalled yet drawn to this issue. " She rented movies, read books and attended lectures. Today, her quest to come to grips with the genocide that claimed an estimated 800,000 lives is taking her to Rwanda.
NEWS
September 19, 1999 | By Doug Lansky, FOR THE INQUIRER
Tracking mountain gorillas was made famous by American Dian Fossey (1932-1985), who went to Zaire (now called the Republic of Congo) and Rwanda in the '60s to study primates. Fossey also wrote the book Gorillas in the Mist, later made into a major Hollywood film starring Sigourney Weaver as Fossey. Following standard operating procedure in Hollywood, the 1983 movie drifted as far as possible from the actual information in Fossey's book. From what I can tell, the main truths it captured were: (1)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1997 | By Sari Harrar, FOR THE INQUIRER
Leave it to Banff to hatch the planet's premier festival of films about mountains and their mystique. Nestled in the front range of the Canadian Rockies, the quaint British Columbia burg has long been heaven on Earth for mountain lovers. There's boulder-climbing right in town. Rock jocks who prefer ice axes and spiked boots frequent a convenient waterfall that freezes solid in the long northern winter. Less adventurous tourists with fat wallets hire helicopters to drop them in the wilderness for an afternoon and pluck them out in time to dress for dinner.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | By Mike Steere, FOR THE INQUIRER
If warring factions and streams of refugees continue to leave them alone, Rwanda's population of mountain gorillas may emerge unscathed from the country's devastating civil war. Being left alone does not, however, guarantee a future for the great apes of northwestern Rwanda, part of a population of about 300 mountain gorillas living high in the Virunga Mountains on the borders of Rwanda, Zaire and Uganda. These gorillas constitute half the world's number of the endangered subspecies.
NEWS
April 29, 1994
CARTOON SANS COMPASSION I was disturbed by the lack of compassion in Signe Wilkinson's cartoon April 14 (animal lovers in the midst of human bodies in Rwanda, saying, "The endangered gorillas still seem alive . . . I guess everything's OK. "). Some Rwandans involved in the carnage there have brought suffering upon themselves and others, but the mountain gorillas, like most of the human victims, are innocent and powerless against the weapons of violence. Ms. Wilkinson is probably aware that Rwanda's gentle and intelligent mountain gorillas are on the brink of extinction as a result of human ignorance and greed.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | by H. Dieter Stelkis, From the New York Times
I climbed the slope of the volcano slowly, knowing the gorillas were near, just beyond the green tangle of thistle and nettle in front of me. Suddenly the wall of vegetation exploded as Bilbo, the dominant silverback male of a group of gorillas studied by researchers, thundered toward me, sending me flying backward, tumbling head over heels to the bottom of this large salad bowl. I lay laughing uncontrollably, heady from the adrenaline pumping through me, happy to have survived, though ungracefully, my first personal encounter with one of the Karisoke Research Center's groups of wild mountain gorillas in Rwanda.
NEWS
March 12, 1993
A LETTER ON BEHALF OF ABUSED FLOWERS EVERYWHERE May a solitary voice be heard on behalf of the prematurely forced flowers in the Philadelphia Flower Show? At a time when we react with a justifiable sense of outrage at the damage done to all the helpless animals in creation, not to mention the persecuted peoples of the Third World, is it not time to come to the defense of the living flora as well? Will no one speak on behalf of helpless tulips and hyacinths, the still-sleepy begonias and stately irises, flowers that are meant to grow slowly to maturity and have a right to a longer life?
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
The 1988 movie Gorillas in the Mist helped make mountain-gorilla tours popular in Rwanda, but an insurgency there has largely ended the tours and naturalists voice some fear for the gorillas' welfare. About 310 mountain gorillas survive in Rwanda's Kagera National Park, where armed rebels of the Rwandese Patriotic Front have been present since early this year. Since January, a group of seven or eight gorillas known as Group 9 has been missing, according to a spokeswoman for the Digit Fund, the nonprofit organization set up by the famed gorilla researcher, Dian Fossey, to protect the gorillas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
In the deceptively short book Marilyn: Norma Jeane, with photographs by George Barris (Signet, $4.95), author Gloria Steinem writes: "If you add her years of movie stardom to the years since her death, Marilyn Monroe has been part of our lives and imaginations for nearly four decades. That's a very long time for one celebrity to survive in a throwaway culture. " You get a memorable reason why in Barris' first photograph of Monroe: The 36-year-old woman who still looks like a little girl stares at us with a vulnerability that shrivels the heart.
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