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Mountains

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NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By MARGARET A. ROBINSON
I recently climbed a couple of mountains. Not big ones. A couple of low peaks north of Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire. One of my fellow climbers was an 11-year-old boy. Kids that age keep you honest, particularly after the first half hour of a new activity which is in any way taxing or monotonous. "Why are we doing this?" he wanted to know as we huffed and puffed along the dull middle part of the trail. The excitement of setting out had long since faded. Even the dog had calmed down and was starting to pant.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Dorothy Storck, Special to The Inquirer
Through some serious social miscalculation, you - reluctant neophyte to the slopes - have become involved with a skier. The snow is falling and the mountains are closing in. Take heart. The chances are good that you can survive. Not only that, you can have a lot of fun, and you never have to ski at all. The first trick is to feign delight when he - inevitably it's a he - suggests a run at dawn before the mountain "gets spoiled. " (Although skiers never quit until the ski patrol boots them off the trails, mountains start spoiling for them shortly after 8 a.m. and reach prime decline just when you think you can go outdoors without thermal underwear.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Surveying a battery of Tibetan percussion that had been transported down Himalayan mountains on horseback, Mendelssohn Club music director Alan Harler had to admit he could not really predict what he was about to hear as 200 singers assembled onstage for rehearsal with the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia. Yet any apprehension about Andrea Clearfield's new choral work, Tse Go La (At the threshold of this life), to be premiered Sunday at Church of the Holy Trinity, was short-lived. The warm, direct music Philadelphians have come to expect from Clearfield, who teaches composing at University of the Arts, has become all the more distilled as it is increasingly influenced by travels to the loftiest regions of Tibet, where she collected folk music and Buddhist songs in 2008 and 2010.
NEWS
March 8, 2004 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There really are mountains in South Jersey. You just can't see them easily. But now you can walk on them. In one of the more remote areas of the protected New Jersey Pinelands, deep in a forest more than a dozen miles from the nearest paved road, stand the Forked River Mountains. Unlike the Appalachians or the Rockies, which scream their grandeur for miles, these mountains - just foothills by comparison at 185 feet high - don't reveal themselves until you are standing on top of them.
SPORTS
February 25, 2006 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You see them huddled at Olympic bus terminals and at mountain venues, old men seemingly unaffected by the raw, mile-high cold. They wear the multicolored coats of the Turin Games' volunteers, but something else as well - a cappello alpino - a little sage-green felt hat that is topped with a black feather that is at least two feet long. They are retired members of one of Italy's most storied military units, the Truppe Alpini. All sorts of Italian police and military units have drawn Olympic duty: There are the Polizia, a kind of state police force; the Vigili, primarily traffic cops; the Carabinieri, or Meritorious Corps, who are a military unit with civilian responsibilities; and the Guardia di Finanza, who, as their name implies, concern themselves with financial crimes.
SPORTS
May 27, 1998 | By Bill Iezzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
While other hot prospects from the Northeast League play Division I lacrosse next year, Abington's Chris Bickley plans to be enjoying the mountains of Colorado. The Ghosts' most skillful player is more interested in snowboarding than in playing big-time college lacrosse. So the University of Colorado's club lacrosse team will be good enough for him. "They have a great club team," Bickley said. "They're working on getting a varsity team. " At whatever level they play, the Buffaloes will be better off with the 6-foot-2, 168-pound athlete.
NEWS
September 8, 1986 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
The great asbestos mountains loom ominously over the one-square-mile borough of Ambler, providing a curious backdrop to an area known for its small-town charm. There is a shopping district with brick sidewalks and cast-iron streetlights, a coffee shop, a tiny railroad stop and a Christian cinema. And there is the asbestos - a substance found to cause cancer - that has been accumulating in the borough as a byproduct of industry since the early 1900s. The small plot of ground in front of the mountains that used to be a playground where children giggled on swings and teenagers played basketball has been closed down and fenced in, its equipment scrubbed to remove toxic asbestos fibers before being locked away in storage.
NEWS
April 12, 2002 | By Nate House
I call it the two-year rule. What it means is that every two years I move from Philadelphia to Colorado. Two years later I move back. Now that I've been living in Philadelphia for almost four years in a row, I think I've broken that rule for good. Recently, I flew back to Colorado to visit good friends, ski good mountains, and experience the things that made me want to move there in the first place. I flew into Denver and learned that all flights to Steamboat Springs, site of the closest airport to my friend's house, were canceled because of a snowstorm.
SPORTS
July 2, 2000 | By Bill Lyon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will happen in the mountains. The mountains are where he will try to crush them. The mountains will take their legs, and then he will take their spirit. Or maybe not. Maybe this time he will be the one to be done in by the unrelenting cold and the cruelty waiting in the mountains. But either way, as Lance Armstrong begins to defend his Tour de France championship, he will enjoy the rarest thing we grant in sports - the free ride. Even if he loses, he wins. He has a lifetime pass.
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Greg Risling and Tami Abdollah, Associated Press
BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. - All that was left were footprints leading away from Christopher Dorner's burned-out pickup truck, and an enormous, snow-covered mountain where he could be hiding among the skiers, hundreds of cabins and dense woods. More than 100 officers, including SWAT teams, were driven in glass-enclosed snow machines and armored personnel carriers to hunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of going on a deadly rampage to get back at those he blamed for ending his police career.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
LANSFORD, Pa. - "Don't leave me! Don't leave me!" So says the ghostly voice, heard clearly and periodically in the No. 9 Coal Mine here, apparently from the spirit of a miner who didn't get out alive. Whether buried or asphyxiated, the names of killed and injured miners are the starting point of Anthracite Fields , the hour-long choral work to be premiered Saturday and next Sunday by the Mendelssohn Club. Its unlikely composer? The cutting-edge New Yorker Julia Wolfe. Thus this brainy, fiftysomething strawberry blonde, a founding member of downtown Manhattan's experimental Bang on a Can composer collective, found herself heading into a rustic Carbon County coal mine on a recent Sunday.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"THE SUMMIT" uses reenactment and documentary footage to tell the story of an expedition that killed 11 mountaineers on K2 in August 2008. I found the approach a bit confusing, possibly in poor taste. Is that a real screaming climber hurtling into an abyss, or an actor? The basic facts are these: Twenty-two climbers from separate expeditions and several nations took advantage of a small weather window to make for the summit under perfect conditions. Perfect weather conditions, that is. The condition of the climbers' readiness was another matter.
FOOD
September 13, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
WALLAND, Tenn. - In the spring of 1959, young John Coykendall was exploring the abandoned Ebenezer Railroad Station in Knoxville when he came across a "life-altering" treasure: the keys to a 100-year-old garden. Stashed among some old newspapers and magazines was a perfectly preserved 1913 catalog from the William Henry Maule seed company in Philadelphia. Seed catalogs may not be the stuff most 16-year-old boys dream of. But for Coykendall, a future farmer and artist who would earn a master of fine arts degree in printmaking and engraving, the catalog's exquisitely illustrated pages of Noxall beans, Surehead cabbage, and Tennessee sweet potato pumpkins lit a flame that would inspire his career.
REAL_ESTATE
August 5, 2013 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
The sign in front of this Poconos property is larger than others on the block, to accommodate the names of two generations of owners and an important message: "Keep It in the Family. " Herb and Martha Ganssloser built the vacation home in Tobyhanna Township in 1974. The wooded quarter-acre lot had a prime location two blocks from Pebble Beach, a strip of coarse sand bordering a picturesque mountain lake. The upper level of the raised ranch features a living area, a kitchen, three bedrooms, and a deck.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
Bob Gilka, 96, who oversaw National Geographic photography for more than two decades and helped establish the publication as one of the world's premier sources of photojournalism, died Tuesday in Arlington County, Va., of complications from pneumonia, said his son Jeff Gilka. As director of photography from 1963 to 1985, Mr. Gilka recruited and deployed field photographers who scaled mountains, plumbed oceans, braved the exotic near and far from home, andsometimes risked their lives to send back an image that would not disappoint.
TRAVEL
July 1, 2013 | By Andrew and Robert Wislock, For The Inquirer
We decided to take a father-son trip into the White Mountains of New Hampshire for day hikes on trails surrounding North Conway, a town in the Mount Washington Valley. The mountains' beauty is breathtaking and places life's priorities in perspective amid life's hurried pace, while providing interesting teaching moments. The first mountain we hiked was 2,800-foot Mount Willard. This three-mile trek was up a rocky trail, with ice near its top. The rising footpath slows hikers down and reminds them to enjoy the beauty.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After helping to build and rehab homes in Kentucky during spring break, 37 La Salle University students began a traditional hike up Pine Mountain to a place called High Rock about 1 p.m. Thursday. What should have been a fun excursion turned into a frightening ordeal when they got lost as darkness fell. The students and three university staffers endured subfreezing temperatures until they were rescued by authorities early Friday morning. The hikers were taken to a local hospital to be treated for hypothermia and dehydration, and one was kept for observation, said La Salle spokesman Jon Caroulis.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Greg Risling and Tami Abdollah, Associated Press
BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. - All that was left were footprints leading away from Christopher Dorner's burned-out pickup truck, and an enormous, snow-covered mountain where he could be hiding among the skiers, hundreds of cabins and dense woods. More than 100 officers, including SWAT teams, were driven in glass-enclosed snow machines and armored personnel carriers to hunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of going on a deadly rampage to get back at those he blamed for ending his police career.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The title of the photo album posted that day on Facebook said everything: "massacre on November 19, 2010. " That was the visceral reaction the mountain bikers of Ceres Park in Mantua Township had when they saw the wooden bridges they built had been cut down with chain saws on orders from Gloucester County officials. There was no notification from the county, one biker said. The bridges, which were built over streams, fallen trees, and swampland, not only made biking easier, but the bikers felt they kept the environment safer at the nature preserve.
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Greg Risling and Tami Abdollah, Associated Press
BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. - All that was left were footprints leading away from Christopher Dorner's burned-out pickup truck, and an enormous, snow-covered mountain where he could be hiding among the skiers, hundreds of cabins and dense woods. More than 100 officers, including SWAT teams, were driven in glass-enclosed snow machines and armored personnel carriers to hunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of going on a deadly rampage to get back at those he blamed for ending his police career.
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