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NEWS
July 1, 2013
Bob Gilka, 96, who oversaw National Geographic photography for more than two decades and helped establish the publication as one of the world's premier sources of photojournalism, died Tuesday in Arlington County, Va., of complications from pneumonia, said his son Jeff Gilka. As director of photography from 1963 to 1985, Mr. Gilka recruited and deployed field photographers who scaled mountains, plumbed oceans, braved the exotic near and far from home, andsometimes risked their lives to send back an image that would not disappoint.
TRAVEL
July 1, 2013 | By Andrew and Robert Wislock, For The Inquirer
We decided to take a father-son trip into the White Mountains of New Hampshire for day hikes on trails surrounding North Conway, a town in the Mount Washington Valley. The mountains' beauty is breathtaking and places life's priorities in perspective amid life's hurried pace, while providing interesting teaching moments. The first mountain we hiked was 2,800-foot Mount Willard. This three-mile trek was up a rocky trail, with ice near its top. The rising footpath slows hikers down and reminds them to enjoy the beauty.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After helping to build and rehab homes in Kentucky during spring break, 37 La Salle University students began a traditional hike up Pine Mountain to a place called High Rock about 1 p.m. Thursday. What should have been a fun excursion turned into a frightening ordeal when they got lost as darkness fell. The students and three university staffers endured subfreezing temperatures until they were rescued by authorities early Friday morning. The hikers were taken to a local hospital to be treated for hypothermia and dehydration, and one was kept for observation, said La Salle spokesman Jon Caroulis.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Greg Risling and Tami Abdollah, Associated Press
BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. - All that was left were footprints leading away from Christopher Dorner's burned-out pickup truck, and an enormous, snow-covered mountain where he could be hiding among the skiers, hundreds of cabins and dense woods. More than 100 officers, including SWAT teams, were driven in glass-enclosed snow machines and armored personnel carriers to hunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of going on a deadly rampage to get back at those he blamed for ending his police career.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The title of the photo album posted that day on Facebook said everything: "massacre on November 19, 2010. " That was the visceral reaction the mountain bikers of Ceres Park in Mantua Township had when they saw the wooden bridges they built had been cut down with chain saws on orders from Gloucester County officials. There was no notification from the county, one biker said. The bridges, which were built over streams, fallen trees, and swampland, not only made biking easier, but the bikers felt they kept the environment safer at the nature preserve.
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Greg Risling and Tami Abdollah, Associated Press
BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. - All that was left were footprints leading away from Christopher Dorner's burned-out pickup truck, and an enormous, snow-covered mountain where he could be hiding among the skiers, hundreds of cabins and dense woods. More than 100 officers, including SWAT teams, were driven in glass-enclosed snow machines and armored personnel carriers to hunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of going on a deadly rampage to get back at those he blamed for ending his police career.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Matthew Brown, Associated Press
BILLINGS, Mont. - The tenacious wolverine, a snow-loving carnivore sometimes called the "mountain devil," could soon join the list of species threatened by climate change - a dubious distinction putting it in the ranks of the polar bear and several other animals the government says will lose crucial habitat as temperatures rise. Federal wildlife officials Friday proposed Endangered Species Act protections for the wolverine in the Lower 48 states. That's a step twice denied under the Bush administration, then delayed in 2010 when the Obama administration said other imperiled species had priority.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - State Rep. Rosita Youngblood (D., Phila.) recalls being stunned when her grade-school-age granddaughter jumped up from a computer to announce that she had found, on a Pennsylvania map, a place called Negro Mountain. "I thought, there couldn't really be a Negro Mountain in Pennsylvania," said Youngblood, who is African American. But there it was, a 30-mile-ridge in the Alleghenies, 275 miles west of Philadelphia, straddling the Maryland border on the Mason-Dixon Line.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - State Rep. Rosita Youngblood (D., Phila.) recalls being stunned when her grade-school-age granddaughter jumped up from a computer to announce that she had found, on a Pennsylvania map, a place called Negro Mountain. "I thought, there couldn't really be a Negro Mountain in Pennsylvania," said Youngblood, who is African American. But there it was, a 30-mile ridge in the Alleghenies, 275 miles west of Philadelphia, straddling the Maryland border on the Mason-Dixon Line.
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