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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1996 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
This is the third year out for Movement Research Exchange (MRX), a program showcasing Philadelphia and New York dancers together at the Painted Bride in the fall, and at Manhattan's famed Judson Memorial Church in the spring. The four performers on last night's program offered work that was notably clear and mostly satisfying, even among the works-in-progress. New Yorker Jennifer Monson opened with the only no-talking dance. She began in near-darkness, projecting huge shadows with a flashlight to an active, rocking score by Zeena Parkins.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Modern dance has always had the clear light with which to illuminate hardship, injustice and psychological wounds. The movements derive from myth, psychology and observed gesture, so the dance is old as Creon but street- smart, too. The dances shown Saturday in the Independent Choreographers' Exchange concert at Conwell Dance Lab ranged from the polemical to the satiric, from a tract on abortion to a plea for opened eyes. Abstraction played a part, too, mainly in Joseph Cicala's The White Parallel, in which the choreographer danced a priestlike figure whose measured rituals danced to chant, broken by the jangle of music and a flurry of worldly movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
The Judson Dance Theater began in a New York church in July 1962. The experiments that started there - making dances with ordinary movements and largely banishing storylines, music and emotional expression - had an explosive effect in the world of dance that continues today. Now, the ever-questing Mikhail Baryshnikov has had the audacity and smarts to stage a sort of greatest-hits Judson anthology, banking on his star-power to get mainstream dance audiences to sit through some of this still-challenging work.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - The liberal and youth movements that backed the military's removal of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi are now pushing to ensure their calls for change are heard in the face of the generals' strong grip on the new leadership. At stake is the hope that the Arab world's most populous nation will emerge from more than two years of turmoil as a democracy. Morsi's removal brought a wave of celebration after millions joined four days of protests last week. But that is giving way to a harder reality for the democracy advocates who organized the protests - including many of the same movements that led the uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and then opposed the military's subsequent 17-month rule.
NEWS
October 23, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
With composers as prolific as Philadelphia-based Jennifer Higdon, even the best will sometimes toss off chamber works that boast of little more than a deadline met and an audience reasonably charmed. But all that I've heard from Higdon is the antithesis of disposability. Her new violin sonata, String Poetic, commissioned by the Kimmel Center and premiered on Saturday by Jennifer Koh, means to be absorbing for performers; desirable for audiences who think anything contemporary is abrasive; and useful, with most of the five movements so self-contained they can be played out of context, whether for encores or curtain raisers.
NEWS
January 19, 2006 | Inquirer staff writer Josh Goldstein
Eric L. Zager, a professor of neurosurgery at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, discussed Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's prospects of recovery from the stroke he suffered Jan. 4. Zager specializes in cerebral vascular surgery and cares for patients with strokes similar to that suffered by Sharon. "We simply do not have enough information to really give an accurate prediction as to his true prognosis. . . . In general, any elderly patient who has suffered a large hemorrhagic stroke and stayed in a coma for a prolonged period has a poor prognosis.
NEWS
September 17, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those who think dance exercises begin and end with step aerobics to the accompaniment of Madonna, loud and fast, might want to stop by Harcum College in a few weeks. Ask for Habiba. She'll be the one demonstrating the lock-lifts. The arabesques. Various undulations. A whole lot of shakin'. And, of course, the body wave. This body wave has nothing to do with hair. Habiba's body wave means the whole body: From the balls of her feet, which rest on the floor, to the knees, which start to bend, to the hips, which give a gentle undulation, to the torso, which leans slightly forward, to the head, which moves up and down and back.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Although Barbara Weisberger said with typical frankness that she hates the word because it is overused, "process" is the term she used to describe the workings of the Carlisle Project in her introductory remarks to the project's showcase presentation of six choreographers' ballets at the Drake Theater on Monday. Jargon notwithstanding, one of the nicest things about these annual Carlisle Project programs is that the choreographers give the audience insight into the process by commenting on what they had hoped to accomplish in the dances they made while in residency at the program in Carlisle, Pa. The range of their interests and aspirations was impressive.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The BBC Philharmonic of Manchester is marking its 60th anniversary this year. It is also making its first American tour, which included a concert Tuesday at the Grand Opera House in Wilmington. The ensemble is one of several maintained by the state-owned British Broadcasting Corp., and, as might be expected, it is presenting on this foreign tour a range of work by English composers. In Wilmington, conductor Pascal Tortelier began with pieces by Elgar and Britten before ending with a Beethoven symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Fairy-tale figures dominated the Academy of Music last night as Witold Rowicki led the Philadelphia Orchestra in programmatic favorites by Prokofiev and Rimsky-Korsakov. The Polish conductor also brought along an unfamiliar Bassoon Concerto by an earlier compatriot, Michal Spisak (1914-65). A work of modest proportions, it provided a welcome opportunity to savor the distinctive, gentle voice of the Philadelphia's longtime principal, Bernard Garfield, one of those blessed individuals who does not appear to have an aggressive bone in his body.
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NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a polite protest, the women wearing dresses and heels, the men in dark suits and ties. But when John James stepped onto Independence Mall on that hot July Fourth in 1965, he had a lot to lose. Being identified as gay - much less taking part in a public protest - could bring jeers, insults, and punches. He could be fired from his job if people knew he was gay. Psychiatrists then classified homosexuality as a mental illness, one that demanded a cure - electric shock therapy, or even lobotomy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though most outdoor performances would benefit from being indoors, the new choral/dance work Turbine unquestionably belonged where it was Sunday evening, at the Fairmount Water Works overlooking the Schuylkill - even though Saturday's downpour had cost it one of two planned performances. Early on, one puzzled over the amorphousness of this site-specific collaboration by choreographer Leah Stein, composer Byron au Yong, and the Mendelssohn Club choir. It seemed to be poetic murmuring, with short congenial melodies suggesting a lamentation recalled from a distant past.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
After 13 years, Philadelphia's Pattern Is Movement may be on its way to a breakup - Saturday's show at Johnny Brenda's is the electronic indie-soul duo's last gig - but at this particular moment, drummer Chris Ward and his pal of 22-plus years, Andrew Thiboldeaux (heavenly crooner, creamy keyboardist, songwriter) are driving to Chicago together, Thiboldeaux driving, Ward on phone duty. With the announced dissolution of the band in April (weirdly - the duo is truly at the top of its frenetic, funky game with 2014's eponymous album)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine the exact opposite of a slick urban home-design showroom, and you might land somewhere in the vicinity of WoodsEdge Farm in Stockton, N.J., a sleepy haven for llamas, alpacas, and honeybees 45 miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia. For Shannon Retseck, that's what makes it so perfect. Retseck, 28, of West Philadelphia, was at WoodsEdge to collect alpaca rugs and talk pricing with Brent Walker, 35, a third-generation New Jersey farmer who has been working to reinvent his family business.
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage and Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Market East corridor shelters plenty of concrete mutts, but the parking garage at Seventh Street may be the ugliest dog in the pet shop. Streaks of rust and pigeon poop mark the five-story hulk, built back in 1966. Its looming presence crowds the Colonial brick of the Graff House and the distinguished gray block of the Philadelphia History Museum. It offers no lure to sore-footed tourists seeking escape from the crush at the nearby Liberty Bell. To fix Market East, the haggard eight-block stretch between Independence Mall and City Hall, experts say it's crucial to fix this site.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The $15 minimum wage movement received a boost Thursday when a member of City Council introduced a bill to put the issue before Philadelphia voters in November. The measure, if approved by Council and Mayor Nutter and passed by voters, is nonbinding: It only calls on city and state officials to pass a $15 minimum wage. But advocates say it would gauge support, place pressure on Harrisburg, and lay groundwork for a court battle should the city challenge the presumption that only the state can set a minimum wage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
The moral of "Mighty Real: A Fabulous Sylvester Musical" appears to be: One generation's freak show is another generation's cultural icon/civil-rights crusader. A freak show is how Sylvester - the gender-bending, mono-monikered "Queen of Disco" - was pretty much considered by mainstream America (if it considered him at all) during his late-1970s heyday. The singer, born Sylvester James Jr., wore his sexual orientation as proudly and comfortably as he wore his flamboyant stage threads - which hardly made him an American darling in those still mostly closeted days.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Simon's Fund, the local nonprofit that highlights the dangers of sudden cardiac death in children, has invested about $200,000 to build the first national registry for adolescent hearts. HeartBytes will collect data and imaging at screenings of students and young athletes nationwide and make it available for research into the puzzle of sudden cardiac arrest. Current plans call for academics to have free use of the data. But if "someone comes along who does have funds, like Pharma, I would entertain a fee for access," said Darren Sudman, cofounder of the fund named for his late son, Simon.
SPORTS
December 18, 2014
May 8: Eagles make Marcus Smith a surprise first-round selection with the No. 26 overall pick in the draft. April 21-June 19: Smith is introduced to outside linebacker during the Eagles' offseason program. Aug. 8: Smith plays his first preseason game against the Chicago Bears and records two tackles. He finished the preseason with eight tackles and no sacks. Sept. 7: Smith is active for the Eagles' opener against Jacksonville. He does not play. Sept. 15: Smith is inactive for a game against Indianapolis.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tiny pink flags appeared recently in the ground to mark the spot where the first townhouses will be built in a bulldozed neighborhood in Mount Holly that was declared blighted more than a decade ago. Some Mount Holly Gardens residents had sued, saying the town's plan to redevelop the area was discriminatory because their rowhouses were being demolished and replaced with market-rate units they could not afford. Their case went through state and federal courts, and was settled one year ago. Under the 111-page settlement, seven homeowners agreed to move and take a buyout, while 20 others were promised new townhouses, referred to as "replacement homes," in the Gardens.
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