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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1996 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
This is the third year out for Movement Research Exchange (MRX), a program showcasing Philadelphia and New York dancers together at the Painted Bride in the fall, and at Manhattan's famed Judson Memorial Church in the spring. The four performers on last night's program offered work that was notably clear and mostly satisfying, even among the works-in-progress. New Yorker Jennifer Monson opened with the only no-talking dance. She began in near-darkness, projecting huge shadows with a flashlight to an active, rocking score by Zeena Parkins.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Modern dance has always had the clear light with which to illuminate hardship, injustice and psychological wounds. The movements derive from myth, psychology and observed gesture, so the dance is old as Creon but street- smart, too. The dances shown Saturday in the Independent Choreographers' Exchange concert at Conwell Dance Lab ranged from the polemical to the satiric, from a tract on abortion to a plea for opened eyes. Abstraction played a part, too, mainly in Joseph Cicala's The White Parallel, in which the choreographer danced a priestlike figure whose measured rituals danced to chant, broken by the jangle of music and a flurry of worldly movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
The Judson Dance Theater began in a New York church in July 1962. The experiments that started there - making dances with ordinary movements and largely banishing storylines, music and emotional expression - had an explosive effect in the world of dance that continues today. Now, the ever-questing Mikhail Baryshnikov has had the audacity and smarts to stage a sort of greatest-hits Judson anthology, banking on his star-power to get mainstream dance audiences to sit through some of this still-challenging work.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - The liberal and youth movements that backed the military's removal of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi are now pushing to ensure their calls for change are heard in the face of the generals' strong grip on the new leadership. At stake is the hope that the Arab world's most populous nation will emerge from more than two years of turmoil as a democracy. Morsi's removal brought a wave of celebration after millions joined four days of protests last week. But that is giving way to a harder reality for the democracy advocates who organized the protests - including many of the same movements that led the uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and then opposed the military's subsequent 17-month rule.
NEWS
October 23, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
With composers as prolific as Philadelphia-based Jennifer Higdon, even the best will sometimes toss off chamber works that boast of little more than a deadline met and an audience reasonably charmed. But all that I've heard from Higdon is the antithesis of disposability. Her new violin sonata, String Poetic, commissioned by the Kimmel Center and premiered on Saturday by Jennifer Koh, means to be absorbing for performers; desirable for audiences who think anything contemporary is abrasive; and useful, with most of the five movements so self-contained they can be played out of context, whether for encores or curtain raisers.
NEWS
January 19, 2006 | Inquirer staff writer Josh Goldstein
Eric L. Zager, a professor of neurosurgery at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, discussed Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's prospects of recovery from the stroke he suffered Jan. 4. Zager specializes in cerebral vascular surgery and cares for patients with strokes similar to that suffered by Sharon. "We simply do not have enough information to really give an accurate prediction as to his true prognosis. . . . In general, any elderly patient who has suffered a large hemorrhagic stroke and stayed in a coma for a prolonged period has a poor prognosis.
NEWS
September 17, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those who think dance exercises begin and end with step aerobics to the accompaniment of Madonna, loud and fast, might want to stop by Harcum College in a few weeks. Ask for Habiba. She'll be the one demonstrating the lock-lifts. The arabesques. Various undulations. A whole lot of shakin'. And, of course, the body wave. This body wave has nothing to do with hair. Habiba's body wave means the whole body: From the balls of her feet, which rest on the floor, to the knees, which start to bend, to the hips, which give a gentle undulation, to the torso, which leans slightly forward, to the head, which moves up and down and back.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Although Barbara Weisberger said with typical frankness that she hates the word because it is overused, "process" is the term she used to describe the workings of the Carlisle Project in her introductory remarks to the project's showcase presentation of six choreographers' ballets at the Drake Theater on Monday. Jargon notwithstanding, one of the nicest things about these annual Carlisle Project programs is that the choreographers give the audience insight into the process by commenting on what they had hoped to accomplish in the dances they made while in residency at the program in Carlisle, Pa. The range of their interests and aspirations was impressive.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The BBC Philharmonic of Manchester is marking its 60th anniversary this year. It is also making its first American tour, which included a concert Tuesday at the Grand Opera House in Wilmington. The ensemble is one of several maintained by the state-owned British Broadcasting Corp., and, as might be expected, it is presenting on this foreign tour a range of work by English composers. In Wilmington, conductor Pascal Tortelier began with pieces by Elgar and Britten before ending with a Beethoven symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Fairy-tale figures dominated the Academy of Music last night as Witold Rowicki led the Philadelphia Orchestra in programmatic favorites by Prokofiev and Rimsky-Korsakov. The Polish conductor also brought along an unfamiliar Bassoon Concerto by an earlier compatriot, Michal Spisak (1914-65). A work of modest proportions, it provided a welcome opportunity to savor the distinctive, gentle voice of the Philadelphia's longtime principal, Bernard Garfield, one of those blessed individuals who does not appear to have an aggressive bone in his body.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
It's been a tough year for proponents of gay-conversion therapy: In 2015, 18 state legislatures considered or enacted laws against ex-gay therapy for minors, a program promising to turn gay men straight was deemed a fraud by a New Jersey civil court, and even President Obama condemned the practice. So it's fitting that, in its twilight, the ex-gay movement is now the subject of a new history, by Temple University sociologist Tom Waidzunas. The Straight Line: How the Fringe Science of Ex-Gay Therapy Reoriented Sexuality , released by the University of Minnesota Press, documents the evolution and decline of "reorientation" - which began with early experiments like induced seizures, electroshock, and aversion therapy, and continued in the mainstream psychology community well into the 2000s.
NEWS
December 15, 2015
"PERSPECTIVE Matters" by Catherine Wallace, was one of the most asinine letters I viewed in print in quite some time First, I agree with Black Lives Matter; you are correct there. Also you are right that the organization is very relevant. Black Lives Matter in its perspective. Again I agree, countless treaties with the Native American people have been broken, ignored and worse. As far as stating that no white man has ever been owned, check out history. I am an African-American, and yes the enslavement of our forefathers was horrendous, as was the subsequent treatment they endured after so-called abolition.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
EIGHTH AND Market was humming with its usual mix of shoppers, transit riders and lost souls on Friday afternoon, as digital ads in the sky bathed the corner below in flashes of color. Asa Khalif stood on a sidewalk near the intersection, surrounded by a handful of Black Lives Matter protesters, and tried to draw attention to a protest in memory of his cousin, Brandon Tate-Brown. Ever since Tate-Brown was fatally shot by Philadelphia police during a controversial struggle in Mayfair last December, Khalif and members of the movement have routinely taken to the streets to call for justice and change - in the rain, in the snow, in numbers large and small.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The first influence that Christian McBride mentioned at the Merriam Theater on Saturday night was not one of the four civil-rights icons paid homage in his epic suite The Movement Revisited . Appropriately for a hometown performance, the bassist/composer instead began the evening by talking about his grandmother, whose hoard of Ebony and Jet magazine back issues provided his earliest introduction to African American history. He made fun of her pack-rat tendencies back then, McBride concluded, but now has her to thank for planting the seeds of his most ambitious work as a composer to date.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BACK IN 2012, Anne-Marie Slaughter wrote a piece in the Atlantic called "Why Women Still Can't Have It All. " It was a fierce, fed-up essay about how tough it remains for women with kids to advance in their careers, 50 years after feminism was born. The essay went viral and Slaughter has broadened it into a new book, Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family , which she'll discuss at the National Constitution Center on Monday evening. I'll be interviewing her there, so I've been thinking a lot about work-life balance, an issue that has consumed me since I became a parent 19 years ago. I remember racing around the kitchen one morning, congested with a cold, my baby fussing on my shoulder, stuffing bottles into a bag, racing to the sitter's and then speeding into work, only to find I was wearing two different shoes.
SPORTS
October 5, 2015 | Ed Rendell, For the Daily News
EARLIER THIS WEEK, I was listening to the radio and a song came on by Timbuk 3 titled, "The Future's So Bright. " Truth be told, the song is fairly crappy, but it has one great lyric, "the future's so bright, I gotta wear shades. " As is often the case when I listen to music, I thought about the relevance of that phrase to life, and particularly, sports. I thought about which Philadelphia professional team it would apply to. Probably not to the somewhat disappointing (at this point)
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a polite protest, the women wearing dresses and heels, the men in dark suits and ties. But when John James stepped onto Independence Mall on that hot July Fourth in 1965, he had a lot to lose. Being identified as gay - much less taking part in a public protest - could bring jeers, insults, and punches. He could be fired from his job if people knew he was gay. Psychiatrists then classified homosexuality as a mental illness, one that demanded a cure - electric shock therapy, or even lobotomy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though most outdoor performances would benefit from being indoors, the new choral/dance work Turbine unquestionably belonged where it was Sunday evening, at the Fairmount Water Works overlooking the Schuylkill - even though Saturday's downpour had cost it one of two planned performances. Early on, one puzzled over the amorphousness of this site-specific collaboration by choreographer Leah Stein, composer Byron au Yong, and the Mendelssohn Club choir. It seemed to be poetic murmuring, with short congenial melodies suggesting a lamentation recalled from a distant past.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
After 13 years, Philadelphia's Pattern Is Movement may be on its way to a breakup - Saturday's show at Johnny Brenda's is the electronic indie-soul duo's last gig - but at this particular moment, drummer Chris Ward and his pal of 22-plus years, Andrew Thiboldeaux (heavenly crooner, creamy keyboardist, songwriter) are driving to Chicago together, Thiboldeaux driving, Ward on phone duty. With the announced dissolution of the band in April (weirdly - the duo is truly at the top of its frenetic, funky game with 2014's eponymous album)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine the exact opposite of a slick urban home-design showroom, and you might land somewhere in the vicinity of WoodsEdge Farm in Stockton, N.J., a sleepy haven for llamas, alpacas, and honeybees 45 miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia. For Shannon Retseck, that's what makes it so perfect. Retseck, 28, of West Philadelphia, was at WoodsEdge to collect alpaca rugs and talk pricing with Brent Walker, 35, a third-generation New Jersey farmer who has been working to reinvent his family business.
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