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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1996 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
This is the third year out for Movement Research Exchange (MRX), a program showcasing Philadelphia and New York dancers together at the Painted Bride in the fall, and at Manhattan's famed Judson Memorial Church in the spring. The four performers on last night's program offered work that was notably clear and mostly satisfying, even among the works-in-progress. New Yorker Jennifer Monson opened with the only no-talking dance. She began in near-darkness, projecting huge shadows with a flashlight to an active, rocking score by Zeena Parkins.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Modern dance has always had the clear light with which to illuminate hardship, injustice and psychological wounds. The movements derive from myth, psychology and observed gesture, so the dance is old as Creon but street- smart, too. The dances shown Saturday in the Independent Choreographers' Exchange concert at Conwell Dance Lab ranged from the polemical to the satiric, from a tract on abortion to a plea for opened eyes. Abstraction played a part, too, mainly in Joseph Cicala's The White Parallel, in which the choreographer danced a priestlike figure whose measured rituals danced to chant, broken by the jangle of music and a flurry of worldly movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
The Judson Dance Theater began in a New York church in July 1962. The experiments that started there - making dances with ordinary movements and largely banishing storylines, music and emotional expression - had an explosive effect in the world of dance that continues today. Now, the ever-questing Mikhail Baryshnikov has had the audacity and smarts to stage a sort of greatest-hits Judson anthology, banking on his star-power to get mainstream dance audiences to sit through some of this still-challenging work.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - The liberal and youth movements that backed the military's removal of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi are now pushing to ensure their calls for change are heard in the face of the generals' strong grip on the new leadership. At stake is the hope that the Arab world's most populous nation will emerge from more than two years of turmoil as a democracy. Morsi's removal brought a wave of celebration after millions joined four days of protests last week. But that is giving way to a harder reality for the democracy advocates who organized the protests - including many of the same movements that led the uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and then opposed the military's subsequent 17-month rule.
NEWS
October 23, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
With composers as prolific as Philadelphia-based Jennifer Higdon, even the best will sometimes toss off chamber works that boast of little more than a deadline met and an audience reasonably charmed. But all that I've heard from Higdon is the antithesis of disposability. Her new violin sonata, String Poetic, commissioned by the Kimmel Center and premiered on Saturday by Jennifer Koh, means to be absorbing for performers; desirable for audiences who think anything contemporary is abrasive; and useful, with most of the five movements so self-contained they can be played out of context, whether for encores or curtain raisers.
NEWS
January 19, 2006 | Inquirer staff writer Josh Goldstein
Eric L. Zager, a professor of neurosurgery at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, discussed Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's prospects of recovery from the stroke he suffered Jan. 4. Zager specializes in cerebral vascular surgery and cares for patients with strokes similar to that suffered by Sharon. "We simply do not have enough information to really give an accurate prediction as to his true prognosis. . . . In general, any elderly patient who has suffered a large hemorrhagic stroke and stayed in a coma for a prolonged period has a poor prognosis.
NEWS
September 17, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those who think dance exercises begin and end with step aerobics to the accompaniment of Madonna, loud and fast, might want to stop by Harcum College in a few weeks. Ask for Habiba. She'll be the one demonstrating the lock-lifts. The arabesques. Various undulations. A whole lot of shakin'. And, of course, the body wave. This body wave has nothing to do with hair. Habiba's body wave means the whole body: From the balls of her feet, which rest on the floor, to the knees, which start to bend, to the hips, which give a gentle undulation, to the torso, which leans slightly forward, to the head, which moves up and down and back.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Although Barbara Weisberger said with typical frankness that she hates the word because it is overused, "process" is the term she used to describe the workings of the Carlisle Project in her introductory remarks to the project's showcase presentation of six choreographers' ballets at the Drake Theater on Monday. Jargon notwithstanding, one of the nicest things about these annual Carlisle Project programs is that the choreographers give the audience insight into the process by commenting on what they had hoped to accomplish in the dances they made while in residency at the program in Carlisle, Pa. The range of their interests and aspirations was impressive.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The BBC Philharmonic of Manchester is marking its 60th anniversary this year. It is also making its first American tour, which included a concert Tuesday at the Grand Opera House in Wilmington. The ensemble is one of several maintained by the state-owned British Broadcasting Corp., and, as might be expected, it is presenting on this foreign tour a range of work by English composers. In Wilmington, conductor Pascal Tortelier began with pieces by Elgar and Britten before ending with a Beethoven symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Fairy-tale figures dominated the Academy of Music last night as Witold Rowicki led the Philadelphia Orchestra in programmatic favorites by Prokofiev and Rimsky-Korsakov. The Polish conductor also brought along an unfamiliar Bassoon Concerto by an earlier compatriot, Michal Spisak (1914-65). A work of modest proportions, it provided a welcome opportunity to savor the distinctive, gentle voice of the Philadelphia's longtime principal, Bernard Garfield, one of those blessed individuals who does not appear to have an aggressive bone in his body.
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NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Self-driving vehicles are coming, a top Pennsylvania transportation official said Thursday, and they will change life beyond anyone's wildest imagination. A new state task force that includes industry heavy hitters General Motors and Uber has been meeting with state officials and transit trade groups to prepare Pennsylvania for arrival of the still-experimental twist on transport. The group is working to devise guidelines for how to safely test such vehicles on Pennsylvania roads, said PennDot policy director Roger J. Cohen.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Energy Department on Wednesday confirmed what many trainspotters have observed: Movements of crude oil by rail within the United States for the first five months this year are down 45 percent from last year. An average of 443,000 barrels of crude moved by rail during the first five months of this year, according to the Energy Information Administration. Nearly half of the crude carried by rail in May moved from the Midwest to East Coast refineries, which have increased their reliance upon petroleum imports.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
When the lights came up, revealing nine African American women standing in a circle, as if in prayer, delegates and guests at the Democratic National Convention broke into a chant: "Black Lives Matter! Black Lives Matter! Black Lives Matter!" Then the crowd quieted to listen to the Mothers of the Movement, women whose children died at the hands of police or in bursts of gun violence. They were there to testify for presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. "She knows that when a young black life is cut short, it's not just a personal loss, it's . . . a loss that diminishes all of us," said Geneva Reed-Veal, whose daughter, Sandra Bland, was found hanged by a twisted plastic garbage back in a Texas jail in 2015.
NEWS
July 15, 2016
By Joseph J. DeFelice A "Weekend of Rage" against the police rocked Philadelphia following the unprecedented assassination of five police officers ambushed while protecting the lives of Black Lives Matter protesters in Dallas. During the Saturday night protest, which was captured in a 40-minute video by the Fishtown Spirit of the Riverwards newspaper, speakers jeered at police officers outside the 24/25th Police District in North Philadelphia. They celebrated the black shooter in Dallas who "wanted to kill white people, especially white officers," and called for more of the same: "This is the face of fear"; "That's what happened in Dallas . . . they did something"; "Philadelphia is Dallas"; and "Dallas is the point!"
NEWS
July 13, 2016
LAST WEEKEND was a cesspool on social media. I was using Twitter and Facebook to keep up with local protests against police shootings that I feared would go bad, and some did - though not as bad as they could have. At one, participants were shouting extreme things like, "No justice till there are dead f---g police. " That's repulsive, especially in the wake of the assassination of five Dallas police officers after a peaceful Black Lives Matter protest. Then I started to get screenshots of ignorant posts on Facebook from people who are apparently Philadelphia police officers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
At farmers' markets this season, alongside the kale and radishes, there are unaccustomed local offerings. Think tulsi bitters for digestion and relaxation, elderberry syrup for immune support, or raspberry leaf tea for pregnant women. Also new to farmers' market shoppers: disclaimers - that the wares are "not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. " This is an offshoot of the farm-to-table movement: Call it the farm-to-medicine-cabinet movement. It's powered by a new generation of farmer-herbalists like Amanda Midkiff, 26, who last year started Locust Light Farm in New Hope, one of a growing number of farm-based apothecaries in the area.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
The public health community far and wide reacted instantly and enthusiastically to Philadelphia City Council's final vote Thursday to tax sweetened beverages. It also largely avoided commenting on one big part of the new tax: the inclusion of artificially sweetened drinks. Some also noted an irony: The mayor who intentionally did not emphasize public health in campaigning for the tax could end up causing a major impact on his city's well-being. And his example will likely resonate in other American cities, experts predicted.
FOOD
June 10, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
A decade ago, Ben Wenk had a new diploma from Pennsylvania State University in agroecology and a decision to make: whether to strike out on his own or return to Adams County and join the family business, Three Springs Fruit Farm. Then, he saw an announcement about a new farmers' market in Society Hill. His family hadn't sold at farmers' markets. "It clicked: That's what I wanted to do. It was the chance to be a vendor here at Headhouse Farmers' Market that convinced me to come back to the farm," he said on a Sunday afternoon in May, manning his stand in the brick-paved arcade at Second and Pine Streets.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
By Craig Snyder A movement arises within and surrounding a major American political party, a movement that rejects and condemns the official and unofficial establishment of that party's leadership. The party "establishment" is vilified as corrupt and corrupting. National leaders in the party, at both the presidential and congressional level, have to fear first, maybe even mostly, their primary elections. They can afford less and less to position themselves for the broad American political center because they must survive ideological purity contests in primaries within their party.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
After declaring they were deadlocked, the jurors deciding whether Daniel Dougherty killed his two young sons in a 1985 fire continued their deliberations Tuesday at the prompting of the judge. The jury begins its fifth day of discussions Wednesday, the 13th day in the retrial of a case first brought in 2000. If the jury remains at a stalemate and a mistrial is declared, Dougherty could face a third trial on the same arson and murder charges. His case is being closely watched by defense experts who say outdated fire science has put innocent people in jail.
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