CollectionsMovements
IN THE NEWS

Movements

NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Judi Sheppard Missett, Special to The Inquirer
A good way to maintain a healthy lifestyle is to combine proper nutrition with regular aerobic exercise three to five times each week. A majority of Americans do one or the other, but not both. Aerobic exercise is any activity that uses the major muscles (quadriceps, hamstrings, deltoids) and is sustained continually for at least 20 minutes. To enhance the cardiorespiratory system, the activity should raise your heart rate to a "training level" of 60 to 90 percent of your maximum heart rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Few composers so readily lend themselves to immersion experiences as J.S. Bach. In contrast to chronological Beethoven cycles that often feel like a musical diary, Bach's Six Partitas From Clavier-?bung I - played Thursday at the American Philosophical Society by Lithuanian pianist Andrius Zlabys - show one of Western civilization's most artistically inventive minds repeatedly exploring a formal idea. But as much as they also create an unusually satisfying six-pack, they felt somewhat compromised when shoehorned into the single evening presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | By Peter Dobrin, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The winds of the orchestra provide a pastoral background for the lark- violin in Ralph Vaughan Williams' The Lark Ascending, played yesterday afternoon by the Concerto Soloists Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia at the Church of the Holy Trinity on Rittenhouse Square. Flute, oboe, clarinet and horn tended to their solos with an ease and joy that has characterized much of the group's solo playing this year. But while playing without a conductor, as they often do, the Concerto Soloists also achieved something in this, the last concert of the year, that is a rarity for them - a unity of sound and agreement on interpretation throughout the ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
BalletX took a chance adding a fourth series to its 2014 lineup: on the weather, on the 4 percent of Americans that even see ballet, and on world premieres by two young choreographers. The gamble paid off. Two pieces by Joshua L. Peugh kicked off the evening Tuesday. Slump playfully mocks gender differences in courting. Men in chinos and shirts strut to mambo music (one spits a handful of feathers!), women in ruffled cocktail dresses stomp their heels and turn away. In meandering movements, men take long, lazy lunges.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | By Kurt Pfitzer, Special to The Inquirer
Halftime at Archbishop Kennedy High School, and the minds and bodies of 13 girls fused into a synchronized servant of music and meter. As the boys' basketball team headed for the locker room, Kennedy's varsity cheerleading team ran onto the court. There, the girls prepared - as they did at every home basketball game this past season - for the Eastern Pennsylvania Cheerleading Invitational tournament that will be held Saturday at Pennsylvania State University's Ogontz Campus in Abington.
NEWS
July 10, 1995 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
The boss is back in town. Wolfgang Sawallisch, the Philadelphia Orchestra's music director, has jetted in from Europe to make his first-ever appearances at the Mann Music Center. He'll lead all three concerts in this fifth PNC Bank summer concert series, with six of the nine works also traveling on the orchestra's European festival tour in late August. We'll get a first look at another Munich native, violinist and newly appointed first concertmaster Erez Ofer, who makes a special appearance this week (though he doesn't officially replace acting concertmaster William de Pasquale until the European tour)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
David Robertson makes no secret of how happy he is to be with the Philadelphia Orchestra. The guest conductor all but skipped off the stage, bear-hugged violin soloist Nikolaj Znaider, tossed his almost-blond hair around, and smiled as if it were his birthday party. "He's from Santa Monica," said one of the matinee ladies Friday at the Academy of Music, perhaps by way of explanation. Everyone seemed charmed. Good thing, too, because the program he inherited from the canceled Franz-Welser Moest visit is less than charming, even if it adds up to an enlightening cross-section of music from pre-World War II Europe: Kurt Weill's 1929 Threepenny Opera suite, Shostakovich's 1939 Symphony No. 6 and - in Robertson's addition to the program - Prokofiev's 1939 Violin Concerto No. 2. What the program didn't add up to was a clear artistic profile of the 41-year-old Robertson, who is being eyed for the music directorship of the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The American premiere of George Crumb's latest composition, Quest, has been scheduled by Speculum Musicae for tonight's all-Crumb concert at the Settlement School. Guitarist David Starobin has the featured role in the piece, which is scored for harp, two percussionists, double bass and saxophone. Starobin said Crumb planned five movements for the work but had completed only three; these, all slow movements, will be heard tonight. Two movements received their world premiere in Amsterdam, Netherlands, in December; the third was finished three weeks ago. "It's an amazingly beautiful piece," Starobin says of Quest, adding that when it was performed in Amsterdam, it received a long standing ovation.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | BY CHARLES L. ZEIDERS
"Liberation" movements in the second half of this century have the nasty habit of equaling or surpassing the level of oppression sown by the regimes they overthrow. Despite its formidable public relations machine, it is clear that the Sandinista government in Nicaragua boasts as many corpses as Somoza did. And no one can witness Deng's brand of "liberation" without nostalgically wondering whether Chiang Kai-shek's deposed republic could have produced debacles worse than Tienanman Square.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1996 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
In the 19th century, Americans would take photographic portraits of their dead loved ones and proudly display them. Now, choreographer Bill T. Jones displays our dying fellows on video, breaking more recent taboos that have made dying invisible. In the time of AIDS, as Jones well knows, showing instead of hiding is urgent. Still/Here, his epic work about confronting death, particularly premature death, is Jones' deeply felt response to the 1988 death of his partner, Arnie Zane, and his own HIV-positive status.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|